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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



FRESHMAN CLASS HAS 

LARGE ENROLLMENT 

Nineteen Twenty-Four, with 128 

Members, is Largest Class 

Since 1916. 

A revival of pre-war strengt h is shown 
by t lie fait Ibat from the Registrar's 
office comes the announcement tliat the 
entering class of Freshmen is the lar- 
gest since HMti. In that year the class 
ot 1U24) had a total enrollment of 170, 
while the entering class of 1994 has an 
enrollment of 199. 

All the various aectinus of the State 
are well represented, ami Boston ami 
vicinity has its usual large quota. Five 
outside states are represented ; Rhode. 
Island, New .Jersey, ami New York hav- 
ing three men each, and Mary land and 
Pennsylvania, one each. 

Ten young ladies have cast their lot 
with the class of 11»'<M and all are fast 
learning the walks that contain the 
fewest number of H's. 

Argy, Warren (i. Turners Falls 

Armstrong. Bradford Kensington, lid. 
Atkins, Harold Weehawken, N. .1. 

Ball, Kenneth M. Bloomfield. N .1. 

Barker, John 8. West Bridgewater 

Barrows, Robert A . (Juincy 

Barteaux, Frank K. Fraininghaiu 

Bartlett, F. S. Wesltield 

Bartlelt, I'. Q. Holyoke 

Belden, Clifford I,. Bradstreet 

Bike. Kdward L Westfield 

Bilski, Francis P. Had lev 

Blanchard, N. H. Pittslield 

Bliss. Klisha F. Jr. Springfield 

Bowers, Frank H. Jr.. Mansfield 

Bowes, Charles A. Worcester 

Bowes, C. ('•. Swampscott 

Brickett, P. E. West Lynn 

Brunner, Frederick Jr., Bay .Shore,!.. I. 
CahaJane, V r ictor H., Charleslown.N.H. 
Carpenter, Earle S. Behobeth 

Chase, Theodore M. Milton 

Clark. C. O'K. Beaihmont 

< oiling, Oscar K. Fitchburg 

[Continued on pace M| 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 6, 1920. 



No. 1 30 



SOPHOMORES WIN ROPE 

PULL AFTER HARD TUSSLE 

Nineteen Twenty-Four Goes Through 

Pond in a Contest Which 

Lasts Full Time. 

Once again the annual Sophomore 
Freshman rope-pull was held ami tone 
again the Freshmen were hauled 
through the oo/.e by the victorious 
Sophs. It was no walk-awa.v for the 
Sophs this year, however. At lirsl the 
.Sophs made a substantial gala, but 
after two or three minutes the Fresh- 
men hogan to hold their own, and even 
rescued several yards from the Sophs. 
Several men. however, on the Freshman 
side were removed for lying on the 
rope, and Ibis nave l he Sophs Ihead- 
vantage again. From then on, the 
Sophs bad it all their own wa> . One 
by one the new men splashed into the 
cold, muddy water. There wen- all but 
about a dozen of the Freshmen through 
when the pistol shot, announcing tin- 
fact that the time was aimost up, was 
sounded. When the final pistol shot 
announced the end of the struggle, 

then R i ! c ;. i I I •"! '■ ''II w'"« Had ""• 

reached the further shore. It was a 
closely fought contest, which told on 
the men of both sides. Coming immed- 
iately ■(let the toot ball game, as it did. 
there was an unusually large numbci ot 
spectators. Cubic ropes were estab- 
lished on both sides o| the pond to 
keep t lie held free for t he contestants. 
On the whole it was one of the most 
closely contested tope-pulls that Aggie 
has seen for several veal's. 



WOMEN'S AGRICULTURAL 

CONFERENCE OCT. 7 AND 8 



OUR OPPONENTS SCORES 

LAST SATURDAY 

At Durham. N. H., Bates 0, New 
Hampshire State 14. 

At Worcester, W. P. I. 9, Boston In 
iversity 7. 

At Syracuse. N. V.. Vermont u. Syra- 
cuse 41t. 

At Durham, N. H., New Hampshire 
Mate 14. Hates 0. 

At Middletown, Conn., Rhode bland 
Stale 0, Wesleyan W. 

At Middlebury, Vt.. Springfield 0, 
Middlebury 0. 

At Medford,Tuft»7, Bowdwoin 9. 



PRESIDENT IS SPEAKER AT 

FIRST SUNDAY CHAPEL 

Takes For His Theme, "Americaniz- 
ing Americans." 

President Kenyoii L, But tertield spoke 
in Bowker Auditorium. Stock bridge 
Hall, at the lirst Sunday Chapel. Oct. 
:t.„; 10-80 o'clock, and bad for his sub- 
ject. "Americanizing Americans." 
There was a retold attendance at this 
meeting, not only the tloor. but the 

balcony seats being well tilled. 

Preident But tertield began bit talk 
by defining Americanism. What did it 
mean to the immigrant , and to all the 

different people! hroughoul the country ? 

His purpose in attempting to define it 
was to stan I be students I hi nking about 
it and asking t hem-elves what it meant . 
Before making a definite statement as 
to what Americanism was, the speaker 
said that it was not "America Perfect 
or "America First." "America Perfect" 

lea type of falee Americanism. We are 

not perfect, and should not attempt to 
make the other nations believe that we 
are. We should not be too contented 
with ourowit ways, but the ideas and 
customs of other nations should be ac- 
ceptable to us. "America First 
[Contluued on page 4 1 



New Dormitory will be Dedicated Fri- 
day Morning. Interesting; 
Program Planned. 

A very interesting and worth while 
program is planned for the Conference 
for Women in Agriculture ami Country 

life to beheld In Bowker Auditorium, 

October 7lh ami Mth. The program 

opens Thursday, October 7th, at 2 t\ h. 

with a foreword by President Butter- 
lield. Mrs. Francis King, Alma. Michi- 
gan, President of the Women's National 
Farm ami t.arden Association, will 
speak on "Vocation fur Women in Agri- 
culture." Personal experience! la 
agricull ure will t hen he given by Miss 

Neitiet. Burleigh of Mroubeim Farm. 

Watcrville. Maine, ami Miss Margaret t.i 
V. I.amliiiauii, Forsgate Farms, Prospect 
Plains, N. . I. This will be fol lowed by 
a musical selection. Then Ml. ( . .1. 
Oalpin, Washington, I). C, F.coiiomist 
in charge of Kural l.ite Studies, Halted 
states Department of Agriculture, The 

program bu t he day will be concluded 
hi a i'.. ouil table discussion with the 
I heme in mind" Women in A gri culture. " 
The leader will be Miss I'.dna (utter, 
Draciit . Mass. 

On Thllisdav evening at M-10 I be 
reception will bfl given at the new 
Women s Dormitory. The program will 

be continued Friday at Ml v. vi ,wiih the 
dedlcatioa of the new dormitory. 

Music will const Bute the lirst thing on 
(he program. Next | lew words of 
greeting will be spoken by representa- 
tives ol New England COl leges at which 
women are la attendance. An address 
will then be given by Miss Sarah 
Arnold. Dean Kmeiiins of Simmons 
College. Boston, This will be followed 

by the preeenlatlon ol keys by Mr. C.A. 

( ileasoii. vice-president ol the Board of 
Trustees. The acceptance ol the keys 

will be given by President Butterfield, 

This conference on Women in Agri- 
culture and Conntry Life marks the 
dedication id the new doi in i lory for wo- 
i men at the Massachusetts Agricultural 

! College. Men and women Interested in 

I making country life even i s worth 

; the living and giving women a part in 

this work through the field of agriciil- 
I I ure, are invited to shaie in this unusual 

opportunitj 10 hear national leaders in 
i country life discuss problems of vital 
| Interest to both town and country. A 

special feature will be the arrangement 

of private conferences for consultation 

with women experienced In agriculture. 
The prospective attendance of students 

is ^o large that with conference guests 
the usual available accoin modal ioni 
may be crowded. Therefore it is sug- 
gested that those who motor to Am- 
beral may wish to secure overnight ac- 
commodations la nearby towns, leaving 
available rooms in Amherst lor visitors 
who come by train. Guests are advised 
to make reservations directly with 
hotels. 



FOOTBALL SEASON 

OPENS WITH VICTORY 

C. A. C. Defeated 28-0. Fast (lame 

on Alumni Field Saturday 

Afternoon. 

The I0M football season started off on 

Saturday afternoon in a meet favorable 

manner to Aggie supporters. < 'mined 
lent Aggie went down before the strong 

Man and-Whilc leant by aM-0eoUBt. 

At t-M the Idea, hers started to till, 
and at the start of the game at :UH> 
o'clock a crowd of seveial thousand 
was (Mi hand to sec I he opening game 

of the season, The cheering under the 

direction ot assistant cheer leader 
Hooper was snappy and I rei|iient , and 
made everyone feel that the team has 
a large student body in back of it 
this year, pulling hard for a vic- 
tory over Tafia and Springfield. 

King of M. A. C. kicked .ill al the 
whistle ami the Connecticut man was 
stopped before getting many ted. 
After two unsuccessful al tempts to pen- 
elrale the home learn deletise I'onnecti 
cut kicked to Sargent who ran back 4.*> 
yards before he was tackled. M. A.C. 
fumbled on the l r . yard line but Cap! . 

Poole recovered oe the IS yard line ami 

look I he hall ovei in a couple of plays 
for the lirsl touchdown of the season. 
He also kicked the goal. The remain- 
der of t he lirst o,uarler was uneventful 
except forgood tackle by King, the Ag- 
gie right tackle. who played a tine game 
throughout. 

S ifler the opening of the sec- 
ond quarter Sargenl made his second 
long gain of the game by skirting right 
end for a gain of M yards, f.rayson 

then showed i he usual Graysoe ability 

and, as his two brothers were in the 
habit of doing before him. he caught 
Poole's forward and went ovei the line, 
for the second score ot the game. Poole 
kicked the goal. King kicked off to 
Connecticut's IS yard line and the, half 
ended soon after. 

Commencing ( he second half Orayson 
ran back the kickofl 12 yards. Sargent 
made seven more ami then Tumey 
dropped back for a punt. A beautiful 
spiral thai went for nearly 60 yards gave 

tiiayson aebaaee to get down and tackle 

his opponent almost in his tracks. Con- 
necticut kicked and Sargent ran back 'A't 
yards. Poole carried the ball for seven 
yards on I line plunge and then sent 
Sargent over for the third touchdown. 

Poole kicked the goal. Coanecticnt re 

Delved the hall oa the kickofl and im- 
mediately started a lush down the field 

which was only stopped when Brigbam 
broke through and stopped a weak side 
play by his opponents. The third quar- 
ter ended soon after. 

Poole made 10 yards at the opening 
of the last quarter but the ball was soon 
lost to Connecticut. After a good 
tackle by McCarthy h.« I I roken up the 

Connect lea I plays Acbeeon brougi t the 



t» 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 6, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 6, 1920. 



Jfatftenooating 
XidG/ove 



m 



i°t 



)5/Sc/ 






Nothing succeeds like success unless it be two successes in succession. 
THE COLLEGE SHOE SHINE PARLOR 

Right by the American Express Office is a success. This new business 
solicits your patronage. SHOE SHINE TICKETS save you 16^. 

JOHN M. DEACON, Prop. Tel. 302-M 



*«i 



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BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 416-W) Hadley. Masi. 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men taught to lead by < ( ui( kent methods. 
InauMmm mt Mill* Studio, 

P.O. Hulldlng. 



Phone 4M1-K 



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jeweler «*-*d or»*ioi«*« 

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Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing 

Promptly and Skilfully Done 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



ball to the shadow of the fOftl posts by 
Mtehlng • long forward. Poole then 

scored tbe last touchdown and kicked 

the ROftl. Clark was sent in to plftj 

quarter antl l'oole played back. Two 

rushes of six and ten yards by l'oole 

gsrtS M. A. C. lirst down. Collins made 

six more yards but a penalty for offside 

lost all the gain. Near the end of the 

name Collins stopped an opponent after 

he had none M yards around end. The 

name ended with the ball in Clark's 

hands received from a kick. BOON 2*-l>. 

Cotton was out of the play for a while 

in the middle of the game hut not 

back in again later on. The play of 

Mackintosh, King, l'oole and Saigent 

was excellent and Grayson showed by 

his tirst game he is going to do his part 

to uphold the reputation already gained 

by his brothers. (apt. Mitchell at 

right tackle put up a slung name f OX 

Connecticut. 



The lineup : 
If, \. c. 
Acheson, le 
Cotton, It 

Freeman, It 
Mohor, lg 
Mackintosh, c 
liunkei , c 
lirigham, rg 
Talmadgc. fj. 
King, it 
Da sen port, rt 
Grayson, re 
McCarthy, re 
l'oole, <|b 
Clark, qb 
Saigent. lhb 
Tai ■plin. Ihh 
Tumey, fh 
Collins, ih U 

Score M. A. C 
downs, l'oole 8, 



1 . A. > . 

re, Snculinan 

it, Mitchell 

rg, II argosy 

c, < i i :i 1 

ly. Jenioc 
jevsnlowati 

le. Kmlgb 
.|i). Baxter 
rhb, Leroj 

lb. Daley 
lhb. Maci 



(ioals from loiichdown — l'oole 4. Ref- 
eree- Carpenter. I'mpire— l.arkin. 
Linesman-Kennedy. Time-Four lf>- 
ininulc periods. 



88, C.A.C. 0. Toueb- 

(Jrayson.and Sargent. 



CORRECTION 

Bale 1 of the rushing rules as 
printed in the freshman handbook 
should read as follows— The rush 
log season shall 1 pen tor Fresh- 
men until <i i'. m. on the third Sun- 
daj Of i he lirsl term. Men shall be 

pledged In Cbapol <m the following 

day. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

CslUi* Jswslrr-Cufi Links. Soft Collar Pins. 
Dress Suit Sett. Violin. Han jo. Mandolin Strings 

Fine Watch Repairing, also Broken Lenses 
Replaced Proniutly. 

SS Helm Street. Amksrst. Mate. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 



Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 



Aggie Stationery 



with Class Numerals 
1920 TO 1923 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - - Mass. 



COP : TE NEW STOCK 

Shoes, Boots, Rubbers 




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Expert Repair Woik Done 

Shoe Shine Stan t, » 



J. G1NSBURG, 19 Pleasant Street 



s 

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Furnishings, Shoes 



AMERICA is fast becoming a pipe smoking country. Every 
■ year more and more men are realizing the comfort, the satis- 
faction, and the economy of the pipe. And by natural selection, 
more and more men are smoking W D C Pipes. This is not 
chance. It is because WDC Pipes offer the utmost in pipe value. 
Honest French briar, seasoned by our own special process make 
WDC Pipes break in sweet and mellow. Coupled with that is a 
self-governed body of pipe makers whose sole object is to fashion 
pipes which are without peers in all the world. And it has been 
accomplished. Ask any good dealer. 

Wm. DEMUTH 8t CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLD'S LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 






FIFTY-FOURTH COLLEGE 

YEAR FORMALLY BEGUN 



SECOND FOOTBALL GAME 

WITH BATES SATURDAY 



President Gives Address of Welcome 
at Opening Assembly. 

The formal opeolag of the 54th col- 

It'tie year look place last Wednesday at 
I -HO, when the first Wednesday assem- 
bly <>t t lie year was held. The Audito- 
rium was packed and a large number of 
the faculty were present on the stage, 

President Butlertleld opened the 
meeting with an address ol welcome to 

all those who were returning to school 

and also to those who were entering lor 
the tirst time, [a speaking to the Fresh 
men, I he president said : There are I luce 
-cis of teachers willi whom yoil will 

come in oontact: primarily, the teach. 

era Under whom yon study: secondly, 
ihe upper classmen: and lastly, the 
beattttfUl scenes of 'his Valley which 
will remain In your memorise as long as 
iron live. In continuing, the president 
recited the obstacles which the college 
hai had to faes during the past yen. 

since June the work of the college 
baa continued all summer, with a \ei> 
large enrollment In the summer course. 

The building program was not accepted 
by the Legislature, and only the appro- 
priation fot the Cavalry barns was 

grunted to the college. A new Cbem- 

itrj building and Library iniist wait 
lor the action of a new Legislature. 
Our need of additional facilities is 
i leiirly seen when we realize that in 

all courses over 1000 students have been 

here to school during (he past year. 

The most serious set -back to the col- 
lege has been the loss id a large number 
of instructors and members Of the clci- 
. al staff. The pay here at M. A. < . is 
lower than in any other agricultural 
• ollege, and many resignations were 
caused by the inability of instructors 
snd clerks to make both ends meet with 
their present salaries. 

The watchword ol the coming \cii is 

Mi-together," or better, all together 

lot a bigger and busier M . A .< . The 
Btdenl hopes that Ibis may be a yeai 
of celebration, and thai students ami 
alumni will work together as heartily 
i- possible. 

Then, too, new rushing rales sati-lac- 

ory to everyone must be formulated 

tnd a system oi credits for athletics 

Mid non-athletes must be worked out. 

During the nasi year a much greater 

nteresl has been taken in the college 

i be alumni, SSShoWU by t heir hearty 

pone to tbe Memorial Bui l di n g Ktind. 

The year of celebration will terminate 

in tbe dedication of the new Memorial 

Building, which is ti> take place in 

June. The slogan for I hat dedication 

will be "Every alumnus back in .lune," 



Maine Team Looks Like Real Oppo- 
nent. Season's Prospects. 

In the second game of the season, 
next Saturday, M. A.C lines up against 
Bates College, which was runner-up 
last year tor the Maine choinpionship. 
Hates is a newcomer on the Aggie 
schedule, and was added when the 
Dartmouth game was dropped. 

The Maine team is coached by Sulli- 
van, an old Colgate star, and is com- 
posed practically ot veterans. four- 
teen letter men reported loSiillivan this 
fall. Stonier, a 2IHI pound guard, cap 
tains the team. Be wa> selected by 
spoil writers as an All-Maine guard 

la>-t year. Wiggin, at quarter, is abou 
the best offensive man, and Is equally 
clever In generalship and in throwing 

lom aids 

Kates has thus far played two games. 

On Sept. K they defeated Ft. MeKlnley 

al Lewiston, Me., 04-0, Last Saturday 
they wen beaten by New Hampshire al 
Durham, V 1L. 14-0. Loth of New 
Hampshire's scores were on flukes. 

All bough outweighed. Kales gained 
more ground than their Opponents. The 
Maine team is light, fast, and agg TCO 
sisc, and is celebrated for forwards and 

for wideopen spread plays, in Maine 

circles, it is doped out thai Kates 
should capture the state championship 
this year. It is expected that they will 

us,, a ipectactlar, overhead game next 
Saturday 



-,'! : ii : i ■•■■:■!■ ':[,':.:>-'■ ■>.■■'■■''. 



SPECIAL GRANGE MEETING 

AT M. A. C. OCT. 18 

Hampshire Pomona < .range will hold 

special meeting al Aggie October 10 

the purpose of conferring the fifth 

;ec. The meeting le held here for 

• special benefit Of students and 

embers of the faculty, and everyone 

has not taken the fifth degree 

iuld be on hand now. The officers of 

Mate Orange will come to Aggie on 

• i.er IS) to confer the sixth degree, 

the National (.range will confer t he 

rente degree in Boston in November. 

nf this constitutes an e\ 1 1 aoi'din- 

opportunlty for all Grangers. Thorn i 

ling further information may call 

Ft: v\ R A V?A1 '.n 

Male Deputy. 



been made, but Salmon, Clark, Wil- 
helm, Barker, and Myrick appear to be 
i lie making of a dandy line, while Tew- 
hill. Ferranti, llilski, White, and 
llairsion promise well for the Frosh 
backticld. The football schedule for 
1084 is as follows: 

Oct. 10- Dallon High School al M.A.C. 
Oct. SO Anns Academy at Shelbiirne 

Falls 
Oct. 00— North Adams High School at 

M. A. 1 
Nov. i) Williston Academy at Williston. 
Nov. |:» Deeitield Academy at Deer- 

lield. 

'1'he dale of the annual Sophomore- 
Freshman game has not yet been an- 
nounced. 



HST*BI ■•■■■■ I 

Stkimikn Lank Folgkb. tsne.i 

MiNUrAOTDRINO .IEWH1.KSN 

IHO liWOAOWAY. NEW YORK 

OKsUB AND OObliKtlE 
PINS AND KIMiH .* 

• OLD, ail.TBK AJfD SKIIN7S UBIUI4 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 

Mai. at 3 
Eve. al 8 



Friday 

Hat. at 3 
Evt. at 8 



Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Evt. | shows 

6-45. 8-30 



Alice Brady and James 

Crane in"A Dark Lantern." 

from the novel by tCllzabeth 
Robblas. a aniqas plot unci 
line cast. 



Path* Naws 
Tastes 



Mutt and Jeff 
Comedy 



William Farnuro In The 
Winn of the Morning." t. om 

the novel of I .on in Tracy. 

I reel Sunshine Comedy 

Scenic reel 

Wallace Re id. Wanda 

Hawley ami Theodora Rob- 

arte in "Doable Speed." s 

racing romance that runs all 
the way on "Sight" 



Monday 

Hat. al 3 
Eva. at 8 



"Hidden Dangers." serial 
Pathe News Comedy 

Clara Kimball Young .mil 
Hilton Sills in "Eyas of 
Youth." from the play by 

Has M;oi in. Tbe Strang** aaa 

fuHcinatiiitf adventures of a 
roBBS girl's experiences on 

the threshold or life 

res! Rig-V Comedy 

Paths Review 



Alter the opening game against t'oii- 
necticui the opinion fell on the campus 
is that the splendid football record of 

last year will be squalled and probably 

excelled this fall. Against a veteran 
lineup, and outweighed. Captain l'oole, 
wilb his excellent headwolk and al- 
most perfect generalship, led the team 

to such a decisive victory that the laig 

est score In several yean was run np 

and man) substitutes were used. Mac- 
kintosh . center, and King, right tackle, 
lived up to I heir reputations gained 
last year, the line made the proverbial 
Stonewall look like a feather bed, and 
the aggressiveness ,,| the team collld 
not be fathomed by Ihe Nlltineggeis 

l in- following is the list oi all candi- 
dates for varsity Football al M a. < .. i<> 

date : 

Acheson. Andrews, Algei 'ill, \iger 

'88, Hates. Kent. Hunker, IJiighain 

Caseto, Clark, Collins, Cotton, Daven- 
port, Field, Freeman, Gould, Gowdj 
Grayson, Gray, Bard, King. Latour 

Lacioiv, Leland, Lent, Long. McCarthy 
Mansell. Mackintosh, Mohor, Mudgett. 
Sowers, Packer, l'oole. Boser, saigent. 

Talmage. 'I'atplin. Tutnev, White, and 

Wentsch. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

GETS UNDER WAY 

Coach B. F. Jakeman Has Promising 
Squad. 

Freshman foot bs II was Inaugurated 

las! Friday afternoon, when about 2."» 

yearlings reported for practice. l> F. 
Jakeman 'jo. who played two yean for 

the Varsity in both baseball and foot- 
ball, has been appointed coach lor 192-4. 
The material, though rather I ess pari 
eiiccd. looks willing and determined, 
and it appears as though loach .Jake- 
man Will develop a tine team from It. 
starting Monday, October 4. practice 
will be held ev ei \ alteinooii mi Fresh- 
man Field. No definite lineup has 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 
LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



All good fertilizers make crops grow. 

HIGGINS' MAKES THEM GROW BEST 

(We don't advertise, we're just telling you). 

HIGGINS OT RUSSELL 'IS 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



IsKO'jSn Shoe 

(Between the Banks) 



Fountain Pens 



Store 



Brown and Black Nobby Spring Oxfords 

MORANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 
Institution Cooking Apparatus 



Manufacturers 
of 



86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON 



C&rp{rvtcr & Morehousf, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The M 



^»~tt« Collegian, Wednesday, October 6, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian. Wednesday, October 6, 1920. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OK EDITORS. 



apparent a need for delinitely separate 
ll:trl , rs . In granting thi C0H«f« «1'" 
neeessarv funds to build a women's dor- 
mitory, the legislature Indirectly placed 
t a Stamp Of approval upon If. A. C. 



Senior Elections. 

The senior class, at a meeting held 
Su.idav in the Social Union Koom 

elected o«©»w forii.etirs. termasfol- 

l ow . : l-resident. Starr M. King of Pltts- 



,„,..,.,, ~ l,,ws- I'resKlent, rsian .m. ix...^, 

i,ss.an M ..d approval nponM..M.K w T» ^ p ^ 

a co-educational institution. ll.e.U.I. hi. ' .,.., : ,rv, Ki..erson F. Has- 



Ia.kkn.k r.MAItll II. K.lit..r in Chief 

. Ionks -1 Maiia«ln* Kditor 

KollKKI I.. JOSF.S il 

Abrociatk Koitokb. 

QIOHI W. El'MAN "•*» 

KKNNK.III A. HAIINAIIU W 

Sl*M.ItV W. HltoMIKV J-' 
I'AII. I.. I»l KNKTT 'Tl 

HOMM W. Hi-kino tl 

hki.imno k. Jaeasoa '22 

.1..HN M. WlllTIII'U'iH 



Hitbiskhs Dki-aiumknt. 
Hkrhk... I.. Or.ni.-21. BiurtnM. Maimer 

K^lr nmto.fl Aaverlisln* Manner 

£!»!«• A. amoU* .mutation Manager 

MVIC'S (i. Ml 1IKAV '21' 

||,», |,KN WlllTTAKKI* TBI 

OWS* K. Koi.rt..M •-':< 



catlOU an.l subsequent occupation ot 

,hese new quartern will mark the Com- 
pletion of the lirst real attempt to pro- 
vide adequate facilities lor the women 
students here. 

The lame enrollment of women in 
this wars~entering classes shows that 
the women of Massachusetts arc ser- 
ous in their efforts to do their share ... 
apiculture. There exists an opportu- 
nity and a place lor the won.en OB the 
farm as well as in the oilier. Ilereflorts 
u , mi ,his place has resulted in the 
l.trodOCtkMl of courses designed to help 
beraloag these lines. The curses are 
well |.lanned an.l al.lv conducted at M. 

A. C. . 

M. A. C. has provided the courses an.l 
wlU ',,,.en tbC dormitory for use within 



el Maid*..; secretary, Kmerson F. Has- 
hun ot West wood; treasurer, Davis A. 
llurd Of Wellesley; sergeant at arms, 
llarland K. (laskill of llopedale: an<l 

elaaa captain, Donald *.. La»< <»f **y- 

nanl. Two men were nominated for 
election to the Senate, to fill the vacancy 

eeuaed i»t the withdrawal tot Roger r. 

Iteadiool the Senior class. Fight were 
non.tnatcl for election to the informal 

committee. « •*••■ lil,u ' r l,, " 1,,n:i ' 

tlonc, one will he elected to the Senate 
and four to the informal committee at 
■jgOmblj on Wednesday. 

Two-Year Caps. 

The OUtCOme Of the sentiment OX* 

p r »*»ed .... the campus last ycarcon- 

erining the wearing of distinctive 

beadgeai by the two year student* 



UNITY CHURCH 

HENRY G. IVES, Minister 

1 twites you to its home life. 

Come and get acquainted. 

No treedai tests. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copi... 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
b ,e to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub 

.crihers will please notify the husiness 
manager as soon as possible. 

Rnt.red a. ..<■»".« .UM matter at the An.her.1 
F„.t OflVe. Accepted for mailing at M>eelal 
r „e of ,....ta B e provided for in section 1105. Act 
„f October. 1817 authorized August 20. IMS 



Welcome, Freshmen. 
For the past week individuals. 



and 



problem he as sueceeef all j solved. 
CAMPUS NOTES 

ta« president will give his annual 

reocptloa to faculty on Friday, Oct. 8. 

The Junloi class in Forestry is to 
make weekly trips by motor to the col- 
lege toiestry reserve on Ml. TOby. 

The services of Miss Harriet Sawyer 
0| Dnrchescte. have l.cen secured to act 



asln'.r?t'i.ne' When . his has l.een done I | ia s l.een the donning of the 00 

'.iJuiediate program wili have ..ecnLnC two year Frcs .0 •£»£ 

accomplished. May the future of this tirsl vt , u men ..f that cure. The* a 

'hlack skull caps, similar to those worn 
|, v ,|.c Freshmen of the regular Hun 
war curse with a white "2 Vlf over 
"the visor. the two year eo-eds are 
wearing l.andeaus of Mack ribbon . in- 
leribod with the Human numeral 11 
| The wearing of these caps and ribbons 
was decided upon by the two year SlU- 
dent <ouncil last year. Inasmuch as it 
tends to give the two year men a defi- 
nite Stat M among the undergraduates, 



SUNDAY PREACHING SERVICE, 
1045 A, M. 

SONG AND PICTURE SERVICE, 
7-30 P. M. 



groups, both of major and minor In 
portaaee, have been whispering and 
•hottttei these words... your ears. 1 he 
spirit of hospitality hassometin.es taken 
„„a peculiar form but, never-. he-less. 
it existed. It is now our turn, we ot 

taeCoixeoiAH sta«. Allow us ... eoa- 

gia'ulate you on you. choice ol college 
and welcome JToa within its walls. 

The acqnirinsi of knowledge, the 
building Of character, the establish- 
ment of friendship: all these |0 to 
make up voiir college career. What 
v,.u may do with the r.rst twols die- 

■ tincl ly up to you. The third will cine 
of itself with your help. Aggie is here 
,„ help you but expects in turn a leas- 
able amount of effort and coopera- 
tion from you. 

You are the 'New Wood" of the Col- 
!,.„,. We look to you tor new ideas, 
new strength, and an effort towards the 
advancement ol your alma mater. To 
he sure, a certain amount of training 
will he necessary before you will DC 
ready to carry on tbl. work. Hut when 
Ihbj has been completed you will Bad 
opportunities on all sides for you to 
peep. What you, as individuals, may 
grasp, is a purely personal affair. What- 
ever von do. remember that M. A. < . is 
„ow vour college, you are now a part ot 
it. You advance or retard the progress 
of its interests in the MM measure as 

you may succ I or fail at your chosen 

task. 



Mill, nin>"" " •— 

as assistant manager to M.ss Diotber. I |f w ft decided advantage, and will BO- 
Mi ss sawyer is a graduate of the home ,,, lU , lU .,lly become a permanent custom. 



e« ni.s curse of Simmons College. 

The Dairy Mock Judging team. COB 
sisting' of Haker. Smith, and llurd. tl, 
leave tOWa Wednesday. Del. «»• fOI Chi- 
,..„.„, Illinois, where they will judge 
dairy CUltle al the National Dairy show 
to be held there. 

ltoger F. BeadlO tl has left college to 
accept ■ position as assistant athletic 

coach at the Horace Mann Preparatory 

School, New York City. While assu.n- 
Imj his duties there he will also attend 
Columbia Iniversity. 

The Department of Floriciilt ure is to 
hold a small fair some time in the near 
future in conjunction with the other 
horticultural departments. At Hu- 
mecting of the Floriculture Club last 
night the plans for the fair were talked 
over by r.ofessor Thayer and the n.em- 
bere of the club. 

Junior Class Meeting. 
At the Junior class meeting held in 
the F.ntomology Huilding Monday Right 
the following men were elected to cine 
before student body vote for informal 
committee today: B V Holasaa.O. H. 
Thompson, F. V*. Wau«h.J.D.I.owei> . F. 
A.. Gilbert, K.W.Moody. Mr. Moody was 



FIRST SUNDAY CHAPEL 

l< ontinued from patfell 



Students' Reception 

TUESDAY, OCT. 19 



R kM false in ihe same sense as'Am erica 

Perfect." 

l'resident Hutteiliebl continued his 

,alk by saying. lt We >"»ist not forge. 
that Amcri.anisin means ideals. Those 
who trv to tell us that America is mere- 
ly practical, hard headed, and looking 
out foi herself, are false interpreters of 
America. America has grown out of 
lh e Ideals Of its founders. It must 
not lose these ideals, or the nation will 
go the way of Imperial Home and 
l'russiani/ed (ierinany. 

Democracy is the great American I 
Ideal which has guided this country 
over three hundred years. The idea ot 
demoerac] is becoming applicable to 
lodustrj M well as government and 
political power. Kvei. though this tact 
la denied in parts of the country, it is 
fast becoming I truth. 

Democracy," said the l'resident, 
-implies at least three great principles. 
— First, a recognition of personality 
the dignity of the individual, the worth 



8-00 P. M. 



, of a. nan as a. nan. the insistence that 

loe;:;,;";.;:;;:,.,, ,, uu >-: rr:;:n;rr 



The Women's Dormitory. 
The dedication of the Women's Dor- 
mitorj will mark another step forward in 
the development of the women's depart- 
ment at M. A.C. Although the fact 
bae not been generally known until 
within recent years, Aggie has been 
eo-educational for some time past. This 
may have, in a large measure, account- 
ed for the previous small numbers ot 
women students. Hut as time went 
,„,. because of the yearly in- 
erease in the female enrollment, 
and the coiise.picnt lack of room 
in Draper Hall, there has become 



Council this year. The election of the 
Officers was postponed until atier 
assembly today 

The Dining Hall. 
the M. A.C. dining hall opened las! 
Wednesday with a record attendance 
More than MOO meals pet day arc BOW 
being served in the main dining hall 
and HoO in the cafeteria. The total of 
1800 meals per day has required the em- 
ploy nie.it of an unusually large number 
of student help as well as the augmen- 
tation of the regular staff. A new dish 
washing machine has been installed to 
take care ot the increase in business. 
A new feature of the main dining room 
is the establishment of four tables for 
the women students, all of whom are 
required to eat at the dining hall this 
year. 



and enjoy to his full capacity. Thisap 
plies to groups, races and nationalities. 
second, democracy spells brotherhood, 
.o-operation, each individual group 
working for the common good. Third, 
all the old ideas of international rights 
have changed. Ideals prevail, ideals of 

real democracy ol national rights of all 

eountries. small or large . ,.t c-operatio„ 
between nations as well as wit hm na- 
tions. Of service to v.orbl welfare, rather 
than the endeaver to advance national 
interests at the expense of other coun- 
uies. We cannot, and will not avoid 
the ideal of American participation in 
world cooperation.*' 

President Hutteiliebl closed his talk 

by saving that through it all a genuine 

religious spirit had prevailed in our 

best thoughts ami actions, andlthat 

nothing could take its plaee.^ 



There's Just One 100$ Efficient 

Cream Separator 

AM" THAT'S THF, 

m LAVAL 

For Forty Years the World's Standard 

There may be a half-dozen plows, wagon- 
tractors, autos or other farm equipment I 
choose between, but no would-be imitai' 
or utilizer of expired De I,aval patents h..- 
yet produced a cream sei>arator comparaM- 
with the De lAval. 

First in the beginning. I»e l-aval machin 
have led in every step of cream separate 
improvement and development. Every y>- 
has presented some new feature or belt.- 
ment.and the 1920 machines are still bett. 
than they have ever been before. 

If you haven't seen or tried a new 1 
l>e tJival machine, any local agent will ' 
glad to afford you the opportunity tod<>- 

If you don't know the nearest l>e t.<< 
local agent simply address the nearest BM 
office, as below. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 

166 Broadway 29 E. Madiion St. 61 Beale - 
New York Chicago San Francir ' 

50 000 Branches and Local Agencies 
the World Over 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

COLLEGE OUTFITTER 



Haberdashery Clothing Tailoring 



Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION 

HELD SATURDAY NIGHT 

Aggie Activities are Reviewed for 
the Freshmen. 

Hast Saturday evening ;it n-uo u'cluek, 
the Annual Kreshnian deception wae 
held in the .Social Union Rooms. It 
•ran attended bj the entire Freshman 

class, as well as bjf almost all ot the stu- 
dent body and members ol the faculty. 

To facilitate self-ietrodUCtlon between 
the entering and the upper class, - 
each person pinned OB his coal a little 
slip of paper on which he had written ' 
his name and that of his home town. 

< aptains Poole, Sowdy, McCarthy, ami 

KaWOl I Of the varsity football, basket- 
ball, hockey, and baseball teams ie- 
spectively. spoke "I their teams, last 
\ ear's records, and the oiiiing season's 
prospects. They urged all men that 
could do BO to go out tor the various 
teams. Lock wood 'sW spoke aboul the 
rartous debating contests thai are held 

during the school year, ami said that 
he would like to see more men out for 
the debating team this year. (.oil, 
leader of the Musical < lubs, ga\c a 
resume of resume ot last season's club 
trips, and stroiiglv advised all students 
that could sing or play any musical 
instruments to try out for the clubs. 
Martin, editor in-chief ot the Coi.- 
i.Kiii.w, and also a member of lhe 
9quib and fndex boards lot the past two 
f ears, outlined the work of the afore- 
mentioned mentioned publications. 
( urry Hicks. I'rofessor of Physical Bd- 
u cat ion, spoke a few words on athletics, 

ami urged each man to go out for some 
activity during his slay at Aggie. Hean 
Lewis summed up all the speeches, 
ind also said that every man ought to 
gO out for some activity, because as 
alumni, we look back t . our collegiate 
days through the various activities in 
which we look place. Hunch and 
cookie* were then seived by the co-eds. 
and more than an hour was spent in 

making aeqaalataeeee. Then, aftei 

singing "Sons of Old Massachusetts. 
the gathering broke up. 



, 



V 






& 






V 








T 



- 






SQTIB BOARD TO 

START A COMPETITION 

The annual competition for member- 
-hip on the Squib Hoard is open to all 
members of the four year student body. 
I here are excellent opportunities foi 
■BOMB la all the departments of the 
-<inili. The Literary and Art Depart- 
.ents. especially, should attract the 

.omen etudents. 

The most vivid picture ot Aggie lite 
hat reaches our alumni and friend 
irried between the covers of the Squib. 

has always ben. a wide-awake pttbll-j 
at ion and indications show that the 
>ming year will surpass anything thai 
is gone before, both in quallt) and in ! 
.dilation. 

Vow is the chance to divert some of 

>■ surplus wit and humor of the 

uptis into channels that will give eti- 

• tnent to the whole student body. 

We intending to enter the competi-j 

i should notify M. K.Webster '21, j 

itor-ta-eblef, Kappa (Jamma Ph) 

lUSe; OT C. H. Vinten '"22, Managing 
Lor, ThetaCbl House; not lateithan 
11. 



- 



Modern Motive Might 

MOUNTAINS, miles and minutes give 
wa3 r before electricity, the magic mo- 
tive power. Properly applied, it drives ^iant 
locomotives across the continental divide, 
tows ocean liners through the Panama Canal, 
or propels huge ships. 

Through good light, safe signals.and illumin- 
ated highways, it is making travel better and 
safer and also is increasing the usefulness of 
transportation methods on land, sea or in 
the air. 

In short, electricity is revolutionizing trans- 
portation, making it quicker, safer, more eco- 
nomical and reliable in all sorts of weather. 

And back of this development in electric 
transportation, in generating ^nd transmit- 
ting apparatus as well as motive mechan- 
isms, are the co-ordinated scientific, engi- 
neering and manufacturing resources of the 
General Electric Company, working to the 
end that electricity may better^ 
serve mankind. 



©EN EMAIL ELECTE1IC- €®M)MMY 



>t 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 6^1920^ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 6, 1920. 






MANY CHANGES IN FACULTY 

IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 



Professors McNutt ond Neal Among 
Those to Resign Positions. 
During 11m Hiiinni.-i a number ol im- 
portant obaoaaa bnve been made '" ""• 
tUfl ol tne Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 

One i>1 tin- most serious losse* • <> the 

Institution lins been the resignation ol 
Prof. John <'. M'Niitt. who tor tour 
yuan lias been the bead of the depart- 
m enl ol Animal Husbandry. Pro! tie 
\,iti is t<> become the Runtern repre- 
■ontaiive ul the American Bbori Born 
Breeders Association; be will retain bis 
headquarters in Amherst. Prof. f. M. 
Salisbury lias been chosen to succeed 
Prof. M.Nutt. Prof, baiiaburj lias bad 
several years experience as ■ teacher of 

Animal II usl.amlrv and comes to this 

institution from Medina County, Ohio, 
irbera i«»- baa aanred as Count} Agent. 
l-rof. Uobnrt W. Seal, who baa been 
coaaeeted with the college for fourteen 
years ban resigned as saeoctate Pro 
feeeorol English, Be baa let! to ac- 

,.,,,,1 a position on the stall of Home 

Correspondence School of Bpringtteld. 

II is successor lias not yet been ap- 
pointed. 

Prof. \V. 1>. Clark lias resigned as 

to-ad Of the department of Forestry , and 
| a succeeded I.V Plot Lawrence K. < .lose. 

Prof. Qroee hi a graduate ol Brown l nl- 

versity and of the Harvard Powatrj 

School. Be has hail several years euc- 

,-t-sslul teaching experience and con.es 

io this institution from Bates College, 
where he has been leaching forestry 
prof. B. A. Harriagton has been ae- 

rured to till the position in the depart- 
ment of Physics, made vacant by the 

resignation of Prof.Harold E. Bobbins. 

Prof. Newell I,. Blme will continue 
with the leaching work In the depart- 
ment of Kural Sociology, which he 
started last spring. 

Mr. George M. Campbell, a graduate 
,,, the class of IWD, hi icrTing as Held 

Agent -if thcCollege and assistant sec- 
retary of the alumni, to succeed Mr. A. 

\V. Bpanlding. 

Mr. Robert l>. Bawley, a graduate of 
i he class of IWO.will have charge "» the 
extension schools and exhibits, t«- 

sliced Mr. John 1>. Kink. 

Mr. Boy " Harris will succeed Mr. 
Gilbert S. Watts as instructor in vege- 
table gardening. 

Mr. bOtrtl M. Lyons s ucce e d s Mr. I,. 

Wayne Amv eeSuperrlenr of Correspon- 
dence Courses and Due. tor «.t Exten- 
sion Service Publications. Mr. Lyons 
i s ;i graduate of the classof 1918 and 

bas bad successful experience as a 
member of the reporting stall of t hi' 

Itiislmi '.'/"'"'. 

Mr. William E. Bynn, a graduate of 

the class of 1916, will succeed Mr. A. 
Lawrence Dean as instructor in Poultry 
Husbandry. 

Mr. Brooks .lakeman of the class ot 
I9SQ ha* been appointed instructor in 
die department of Physical Education 
Io take the place of Mr. UHim M. Mc- 
Carthy, who resigned In the spring. 

Mr. A. I.. Tower, a graduate of the 

College in l«»l.*i, has been appointed in- 
structor m Physics to IU I Mr. 

llenrv L. Hurt. 

Mr. Raymond W.Swift, a graduate ol 

the class of IPSO, has been appointed 
Assistant Chemist in the Experiment 
Station to succeed Mr. Art bur M. 
( I a ike. 

Hr. Adalbert Sheffield bastakenthe 

place of Mr. Van Horn, as Superinten- 
dent of Hairy Manufactures. 
OtL« new appointments to fill *u« 



oaaciesornew poeltionaare; Mr. Harlan 

S, Worlbley, a graduate "t the class ol 

iiciii, as Investigator In entomology . Mr. 
James M. Kelll, Instrnctorln Microbiol- 

ogl and William I.. Robertson ol the 
dais of 19J0, instructor in Horticultural 

Manufactures, 

Other vacancies which bave recently 

oecured and to which no appointments 

have been made are: Boj B. Cooley, 

Extension Instructor In Animal Hus- 
bandry; Fred <•. Merkle, Instructor In 

AgT -my ami Henry E. Haslell .Kxleti 

■ion Bpeoialisl in Sheep Husbandry. 

Professor Sober) J. Bprague has been 
granted ■ leave ol absence lor a yeai . 
to lake up special educational and ad- 
ministrative work in connection with 
one of tb«- Southern colleges. During 
l,is absence Prof. L. B. 1'nrker will 
se.ve as acting bead ol the department. 
Dr. Sprague's courses will lie conducted 
by Prof. Parker ami Prof. Btms "I M.A. 
( . and b) I'rof. Tyler and Prof. Crook ol 
Amherst College. 

|., u i. c. ii. Patteraon will give lull 
lime io teaching and Prof. W. U. Macb- 
mci will serve as Assistant Dean. 



Be Sure You Buy Right 






F. M- THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schafiner & Marx Clothes 



NIGHT SHIRT PARADE IS 

A WIN FOR SOPHOMORES 

Results Show Narrow Margin of 

Seven Points at Close of 

Nocturnal Fight. 

The Sight Bbirt Parade, an annual 

contest between the Sophomores and 

freshmen, ilivw lame crowds aiolliul 

presbroan Pleld last Friday night 
shortly alter 7-OOo'clock. The etenl 

«:,s won bj the Sophomores b) a small 

margin. 

At Ton o'clock i he l-'rosh were - 
renely sented, In their white nigbl 
shirts or pajamas, In the Drill Ball, 
awaiting the coming ordeal. Sopho- 
mores, armed with the paddles, danced 
and hooted around their kCCUlinglj 
scare. 1 victims. However, some ol 
them refuse. I to be scare. I and Ibis si- 
litn.le made several ol the Sophs ipiite 

indignant, and at times Senate mem- 
bers had io intervene. 

The parade started outside the Drill 
Ball w lore I be would-be wan mis lined 
up in the form of a gauntlet. One at a 
time the white forms .billed through 

the line, receiving now end then ■ 

smart whack from the Sophomores' 

weapons. I small part oi the .lass bad 

mi, |he gaunt Iff' when ;i Stampede 

began, which cause. I tbeSopbs to lose 

control an. I be overcome bj the on-com- 
ing, white clad l-'iosh. 
The parade continued in g«K»d order 

until the battle ground w;is reached. 

Here the uniformed men formed a 
circle, drop-tbe-bnndkercbicf lasblon, 
and were encircled bj the plaln-clotbes 
men. At the Bring Ol :i pistol each 
siaiie.l in opposite direct'ooa and con- 
tinue. 1 going around Until a secoinl 
shot. Then the circles broke, and one 

could see on all sides livclj wrestling 

matches, where the Sophomores in- 

deavered to rip "it ' in* uniforms oi their 

opponents. Kacb class bad pens at Op- 
posite ends of the held, and it WBS part 
of the contest tor .Sophomores to drag 
1 Freshmen into their pen, ami vice 
' versa. When the seven minutes of 
1 fighting vv;iso\er.a count was taken, in- 
cluding the men in the pettS and the 
number of missing nightshirts I he 
lesults showe. I MVen points in the 
Saphomores' lavor, 

•The event w;is a huge success, in that 
it brought out a revival ol thai <>ld and 
well-known kggtC spirit . w bi.b seems 
■are tn prcvnll throUgboUl the year. 



Use our Sales Slips at the College Store. 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 

»«a. u. •. f»T. orr. 

Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

| , B5 ,o.««» Of '"t «»i«.c«~ «a«<CULTU«»l cMcmc.L co«.««» 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



PYROX SALES CONVENTION 

HELD IN BOSTON 



First Gathering oi Its Kind. Seems 
Like An Aggie Reunion. 

August Mrd, '24th and 25th, the Bow- 
ker Insecticide Company had its lirst 
1'yrox Sales Convention at the home 
..dices of the company in Boat on. From 
the number of Aggie Alumni present. 
anyone Bight almost have assumed 
that it WM an Aggie QetHo-Oetber. 
Of the M nana at the Convention, ten 
were M. A. C. Alumni. Besides 1*. W. 
I'iekard '11, who is General Sale-, Man- 
ager of the Company, there was J, p. 
Shaman 14 and II. .1. Wood '14, of the 
boston sales district. From the ltalti 
more territory were M. .1. Cloaurh '!."». 
V Moorhoiise 17, A. 1.. Chandler '11», 
and G. B, Crafts '2(1. II. C. Darting 'Hi 
who gave up his work July 1st selling 
I'yrox in the South to take charge ..1 
the Chicago ollice, together with I). 
I'utter '16, and S. I'. Hatchebler '2(1, 
represented the West. (). Ii. lirigns u'.» 
who was formerly connected 'with the 
liowker Fertilizer Company and is now 
handling the Pyrox advertising, was 
ilso present. 



ALUMNI 

04. — M. F. Abeam lias given up his 
position as Professor of Horticulture 
in the Kansas State Agricultural College 
to become head of the Department of 
I'liysiual Education is the same InStltU- 
tlOn. 

'UK. — Announcement has been re- 
ceived of the marriage on June 1(1 of 
f. F. HutcbingstoMisHHulah V.Wellen. 
Mr. Hutchings is located with t tie Fed- 
eral Hoard for Vocational Kducalioii at 
1'oston, on placement work. 

*0n\ — Theodore Cronyn is doing going 
I work as highway engineer in the 
■ public of Santa Domingo. 

'00.— W. F. Learned has gone into the 
Silver Fox industry at his farm in 
Florence. 

10. — A marriage announcement has 
B received, dated July 21, of Harold 
I. Moore to Miss Mary E. SttJlagber 

I Jock la ml. 

11. — S.K.l'arsons has left the Bureau 

"I Standards, and is instructor in 

PhytJen and graduate student at the 

l uiversity of Michigan. He is the 

iiorof Technical Reports, Numbers 

nd HH of the National Advisory Com- 

ee for Aeronautics, "Properties of 

■ ial Types of Radiators,"' and 

'lessure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes. " 

'Kl— Everett H. Cooper is superinten- 
deul of a leaf tobacco factory at Wilson. 

13. — An announcemennt has been re- 
el of the marriage on Aug. 21 of S. 
Huntington to Miss Sarah Marjorie 
• IrurT. The couple will make their 
»■ in Batavia, N. Y. 
I 14. — Mr. and Mrs. Hayden an- 
inee the birth of a son, John Ellerton 
^ug. 12. 
10, — F. A. Stone of Worcester and 
Either H. Chase were married in the 
isl Church is Holden on June N. 

17. — Warren Sturtevant has en- 
1 the employ of the Springfield 
Deposit and Trust Company. 



The Logical Place to Buy Your Supplies 

An Aggie Store run by undergraduates who Know what undergraduates want. 
Let us serve you. MAKE US A VISIT 



'17. — An announcement has beeu re- 
ceived of the marriage, Sept. i,<>i Mr. 

Franklin 11. Hubbell to Miss Helen I.. 

< teborn at Kaaton. 

'17. Milfonl Lawrence has recently 
moved to Minneapolis, where he bai SC 
cepte.l a position with Monli and 

Nichols, Eandscape architects. 

'18. — W. (J. Buchanan, who was '.■ 
eeatly married, Is located al Bernards 

ton. where he is principal Ol the local 
High School. 

'IK. I., w. Wilbur is in Shanghai, 
China, where be Is in the banking Im- 

incss. 

•10.— "Bid" Stock. well i- with Hayden 

Stone A Co., Boston, as ollice assistant 
in the bond bouse. 

"i'.». chiirles Jewell, who has been 
Inking graduate work in the eheraistrj 
department, has accepted ■ position as 

chemist with the Halted Males Rubber 
Co. at its W socket. I!. I., plant. 

i'.». Julian Beuhi toetudj for mis- 
sionary worh nl boston University this 

fall. 

'lt». — Henry J. iiurl is tl mploy- 

menl ami service manager for the \\ f, 
Whitney '<>., chair manufacturers ..I 

Ashburnliain. 

'IB, — E. M. I >u it 11 in is herdsmen ai 
the Bonnie Lee farm in South Httdley. 

'1». — C. I). Rlanchar.l is teaching an. I 
Coaching athletics thin fall at the Mont- 
pelier Seminal > . 

'•2d. — M.A Roberta has a position in 
the chemical Ittbortttorj ol the II. -I. 

Heine Co. 
'80. G e o . K. Redding bas accepted a 

position as chemist with the Bradley 
Fertilizer Co.. at North Wevmoiith. 

'SO, Cuy F. MacLeod is entomolo- 
a'lsi tit the (few York stale agricultural 
Ex peri menl station at Geneva, N. Y. 

'SO. -George W. npae] is tnhleg a 

post -n radu ate course at If. 1. T., Boston, 
spedaliaing in chemistry. 

'20. — Ceo. K. Babbitt has a position 

as farm manager at Marion. 

'SO.—Carl P. Graves la attending the 
\ew York Telephone • '« School at 

New Yolk City. 

'•21).— Wm. II. I'eckhani is with t he 
Lane Construct ion Co. ol .M.ii.len. 
Conn. He is now superintendent ol 

struction at Bingham ton, \. Y. 

'20. — E. II. Taylor is taking up 
animal husbandry work at the Ohio 

state University. 

'2(1. — John K. Delahunt is connected 
with the nursery inspection service of 

the .Massachusetts Department ol Ay- 

ilculture, 

'20. — J. A. Crawford, last yenr man- 
aging editor of the 1 01,1. i..,i \ \ . is now 
on the reporting stall of the Springfield 
RepuhlicttH. 

'SO.— Howard Qnadland was slight lv 
injured in the notorious Wall street ex- 
plosion of Sept . l'i. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobber* of Wrought Iron and BttMS Pipe. 
Valves and Klttlnitu for Steam, Water ;ui.I 
«;as. Asbestog an.i Magnssts Botlar and Pipe 
Coverings. Pipe Cat toBkctch. Mill hui>i>iiei 
Kngrlneerg and Contractors for Stean. an.l 
Hot Water Heatlnif. Automatic Sprinkler 
Srstenis. Boiler and Efisine Connections. 

Holyoke, Maes. 



Dairy Science. 

When the Agricultural Colleges en< 
tared the tiebl of Dalrj Bnsbnndry the) 

turned the lioht <>| science upon this 
industrial lid. I with the result i hat 
better methods ol manufacture and 
bigh«grade products are made possible, 
among tbeee better methods none 
appear to be more Important or more 

'easarj than sanitary cleanliness, it 

good results aie to he obtained, and the 

Us.- o| 



is recommended i>> the Agricultural 

Colleges ol the United Stales and Can- 
ada, becaii-e the li.sh, w liolesoine, san- 
itary cleanliness this eleauel provides is 
not only an adequate protection io the 
dairy from Insanltation, but is also 

proving most efficient audi uonomical. 

Indian in elrcla 

Order from youi supply 

house. 

It ( leans clean. 

ill e\cij pkg 

The I. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfra., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



PLAZA 

Northampton . . Mass. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

\\ asm ike neel 

PHOTO-PLAY 



A 1 <■ hIiowii. 

Proaram chansed daily except Monday 
and Tuesday. 

1 click r lihi.Movi. Maaager. 



PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 
Quiet and Comfortable — Every 

facility tor 

BANQUETS, PARTY DINNERS 

European Plan. 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

We have a snpplji oi i reah 

Carnations, Roses, Violets 

Also Potted Plants 

QBOH n OH I'm Ca nn I 

FLORICULTURE DEPARTMENT 



ii'ii'i'iione :ntu 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Harnp." 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 







8 



t Ut Mo^rh^^ Wednesday, October 6, 1920. 




NEW MEN IN COLLEGE 

Continued from psgs " 



( looke, Robert 6, 

< roinack. Kill I A. 
< ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ i i 1 1 !Z s . Leslie S. 

Darling, Bobert M. 

Davis. 1 1 « i w ;»i <i II . 

Dead, C. P. 

Dresser, Allan I.. 
DuHois, Martin I,. 

Baton, William ll. 
Basery, Baorge B. 
Pernald, Leland II. 

Keiranti, Ktlmiiiitl T. 
Flint, Until C 
Front, Willard C 
Qarreteoa. A- Coawln 

Bound Brook, N. •'• 



Richmond 

Micihurnc 

Webster 

Cambridge 

Brockton 

\ rubers! 

Leominster 

New Pelts, N- V. 

Wilhrahani 

Marlboro 

Bedford 

W. Brldgewater 

Boston 

Milfont 



Qeiger, Almas B. 
Gtfford, Rleberd s. 
Goldsmilb, Eliot 
Grieve, Alaxandei 



Peperell 

S. West poll 

Brookllne 
Dorehettei 



Uairstoa, Joseph J. Hameatead, Pnan. 
Haskell, Malcolm i;. Lebanon, I 



Baydea, Lather I... Jr., 

Mill, Carroll V. 
Holsteln, .1. B. 

Hopkins, David 

lloUowa> . Clarence vf. 
Hubbard, Dei i- 
Humphrey, L. B. 
Hntehlns, <>. II 
Bane, B. A. 
Kennedy, B. ™. 
Bllboura, James 8. 
King, B. ll. 
Lamb, Brk f. 
Lane, Wilfred <'. 
Lelaad, Allen s. 
Lorlag, Kenneth B. 
sfacAfee, Bonaaa ll. 
sfaeaaley, l>. 
Mader, Bnssell I 
Manchester, Phillip 
MiK.lroy. James C. 
Mfiriik. Charles I. 
Merrick, smart ll 
Miller. Warwick B. 
Morse, Alfred B. 
My rick, Sterling 
Nelson, <arl <>. 
Nieoll. Arthur C. 

Noyes, Bnssell 
Nutting. Baymond B. 
Osborne, Floyd ll. 
Pearson, Jobs C. 
Pordral, Hordes t. 
Parry, John T. 
Porges, Header 
Pratt, Wallace v. 
Bead, John B. 

Reynolds. .1. S. 



Brooketlle 

Worcester 

Qulaoey 

Bedford 

Holden 

Newton 

Warebam 
Bbelbarne 

West field 
Cambridge 
Cambridge 

Melville 

Wabaa 

Fttehbarg 

K. Brldgwatar 

Melrose 

Cambridge 

Beverly 

Waltham 

Fall Kiver 

Orange 

Wllbraham 

WUbraham 

Providence, it- I« 

Oakland 

Loagmeadow 

Bloucester 

Qalncy 

Sewtoiiville 
Fit elil turn 

Noiwell 

Cambridge 
Hedfleld 

Walt li a ni 
Hyde Park 

Bocklaad 
Springfield 

Attlehoro 



Bbodee, Haxine A. 
Bbodes, WlnthropG 
Bicker, 0. 8. 

Boot, Frank E. 

Boeder, P.ank B. 

Unwell. ElwyB -I. 

Salmon, Kenneth 

ScliaetTer. C. tt- 

Sellers. Wendell P. 
Sherman, W. W. 

Sinie, Arnold .) 
Slack, Marion .1. 
Smith. Vera 1. 
Staobner, Alfred I'. 
Steele. Charles W. 
Steele, Robert F. 

Bterllng, Ann 
stone, Qeorge L. 
Tewhill, Charles J. 
Thompson, Alice F. 
TborntOB, Clarence 1". 

Tobey, < : . s - 
Turner, D. B. 
Yarnuin, v., Jr. 
Waagb, Allien F. 
Weatherwaz, H. B. 

White, Samuel 11. 

Wiiheim, George H. 
Whitney, William A. 
Williams, Jamas I. 

Witt. Fail M. 
Wood, Kutii M. 
Wood, w w. 
Woodworth, BoberJ H. 



WUUamabari 
Wabae 

Worcestel 

Bernardstoa 
Turners Kalis 

Amherst 

Beedbam 
Ubfield 

Melrose 
Doroheetei 

Adams 

Uvde Park 

A in lie rst 

Windham, Conn 

Ifarblehead 

Cbepachet, B. I. 

Kancasier 

Brockton 

Florence 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Belmoni 

Cheeter 

Lowell 
Amherst 

i .reenlield 

Orange 

llolyokt 
Taunton 
Siinderhiml 

Belchertows 

N. Andover 

Harre Plains 

Newton 



College Candy Kitchen 



THE PLACE TO GET 



Home-made Chocolates and Confections 

MADE DAILY 

PURE AND FRESH CHOCOLATES 
Creams and Biscuit centers 



FRUITS 



NUTS 



Cream Caramels and Taffies 



AT THE FOUNTAIN 



VARSITY NINE STARTS 

FALL PRACTICE 

Captain Newell in Charge of Candi- 
dates. 

The varsity baseball team under the 

.uperrlsi a* Captala Newall obtalaad 

thill unitonns las. Thursday and as 

, ong M good west her keeps up will hold 

d .Hy practice oa Alumni Field. Those 
,„,,„ ((l ,. lHl years tea... who are let. 

,,,,. Hawaii c Moseley 2b, Hllyard as, 
,,.„, :U, Collins If, Brigham p, Broach 
p.aadCoomUas*. CaWas and Brig- 
bamaraoathe ranlty abvme and will 

he unable to practise Ihls fall. ColllO. 
Who won the arias Cap las. year, and 
Hllyard, have been Playing consistent 
1(:l „ ;l ll summer and should surpass 
du-ir P.r-iO form next Spring. New Cao- 
lll(latl . s who promise to make cou.pe.i- 

Uoa exciting are Tama, W, Grayson 

■ M Kaneuf »», Alexander », Marsh- 
man IB, Wbltaker '», ami Nichols 24. 

Nichols is a former Thayer academy 

player. 



DELICIOUS HOT CHOCOLATE WITH WHIFPED CREAM 



Main Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



EAT MORE DAIRY PRODUCTS 



All of our dairy products are made 
from pasteurized milk and cream 

Salt and Sweet Butter. 

Cottage,Neufchatel,01ive, 

_ - ... 4.TU— I Pimento and Club Cheese 

Hotel Worthy 1 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Ice Cream. 

Drop in for a meal or over 1 Send for our pr ice list 
night. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



TARIFF REASONABLE 

Main and Worthington Streets 

(Give •• • trial) 



Dairy Department 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Amherst Mass. 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
If. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 
Non Athletic Association. 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 
Football Association. 
Track Association, 
Hockey Association. 
Basketball Association, 
The Collegian. 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-one Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 



Telephone 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 454 NV 

(i. M. Campbell, Secretary 1 75 J 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 4<>3- M 

F. P. Rand, Manager 13 6 K 

C. D. Kendall, President 83 14 

C. F. Clark, Manager 28c 

Lorenzo Fuller, Manager 8325 

p, A. Gilbert, Manager 8321 

|. I). Fvers, Manager l<6 > 

C. W. Bunker, Manager 8* 

L. 1\ Martin, Fditor 837 

(1. W. Fdman, Manager 28 

If. F. Webster, Fditor 21 

Frederic Howard, Manager 832 

C. D. Kendall, Manager 2S 

H. W. Spring. Manager 2J 

Howard Goff President 831 



Btodm^'A^mom I HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

- 11 c 



C. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 



The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Can 

Amherst, - *** 



RUfJS AND CARPETS 

-K. I). MAR8H K8TATK- 



— The- 

COLONIAL INN 

High Grade 1 1 Pleas™* Street 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



-AT- 



Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoemam. 

Main St., Amherst 



JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 



The Btudeot gathering place 1 
the real home cooking an.l 
college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 



[Bo, 






QCT 1 1 1920 

[jrlctil t » irul 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 



No. 2 



BATES DEFEATED IN 

SECOND GAME 21-7 



NEWELL IS ELECTED 

TO COLLEGE SENATE 



ABIGAIL ADAMS HALL TO BE 
NAME OF NEW DORMITORY 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 
TO START OCTOBER 15 



Poole, Cotton, Grayson, and Lent 
Feature in Aggie Victory. 

The MOOnd jjanie of tin- f — OB, wilh 
HateH, proved loliea little oloMI bftttlf 

ilntii the tirst t;:« int- : Imt <i>:»ch «;<»re's 
men came out victorious ftftftin, this 
lime by a 21-7 Hcore. Th« only mniK 
niaile l»y Hates was ina<le by Kinneuan 
who received the hall from the ktekofl 
at the bOfdoolag of the second half and 
run eighty-five yards through tlic Augie 
ii'iun for M touchdown. Moullon kicked 
the goal. 
The game in detail follows: 
Hates ran the hall hack tifteeu yards 
Horn the kickotl and then kicked to 
btfpjeat. After an exebftOffC of punls 
Cotton uot in hchind the Hates line and 
tackled the Hatew man for a loss of eiuht 
\ardH. A forward pass yavc Hates tit 
teen yanls which they im-ieaned fo 
twenty-five when Round- went aiound 
end for ten more yards. An attempt at 
the name play wan then Mopped by 
King who t;ot in and caused a !(•«■- it 
ten yards. After Hates had l»een penal- 
ized five yards for offside they tried a 
lorward pass which was inleicepted hy 
Mackintosh. Lent gained live yards 
through tackle and the quarter ended 
when Collins punted to Hates. 

A forward pass netted Hates twenty- 
live yards at the opening of the second 
ipiarter. Mackintosh auain intercepted 
I pass and Poole and h*nl went Ibmtlfi) 
the Hue foi four yard nains hefore Col* 
lius kicked. The Hates man who received 
the kick was tackled in his tracks. 
I'oolethen intercepted a forward pass 
and ran 20 yards hefore he was tackled. 
Loot gained ten more yanls and 
placed the hall on the live yard line 
Iron where Capl. Poole scored the lirst 
i.iiuhdown. He kicked the goal. Collins 
kicked to the fifteen yard line and 
Hales returned the kick, iecoveriiqj the 
ball when Sargent fumhled. Mansell 
intercepted a forward pass and Collins 
kicked to the ten yard line. Mansells 
shoulder was found to he fractured 
and he was forced to leave the game. 
\c heson replaced him. 

Flanagan started the second half in 
in auspicious manner for Hates by re- 
[Continuednn pagf si 



Informal Elections Also Held at the Dedication Held in Connects n With 



Mass Meeting. 

Al the mass meeting following latl 
Wednesday's assembly. Philip 8. Sfea 
ell '21, of Wesi Newton, was elected lo 
the Senate from the Senior claas. to till 
tba vacancy caused by the willolrawel 

of B. K. Readlo 'SI, from college. Mew- 
all has heen prominent in varsity ath- 
letics, bavins heen a ineinlicr <>t the 
varsity relay and baaeball teams lit- 
is captain-elect of the latter for I he 
199] season. In class aflaii's he bM 
heen active alno. .lust prior lo hi^ leas- 
ing eollage at Lbe oi»nclu»lon ol ins 

.Sophomore year lo enter ihe service, In- 
had heen elected to the Senate as a 

Junior member, but automatically lost 

his seat in that bodj l>y lailinu to re- 
turn tl e\i fall. He is a number of 

Adelphia and of the Phi Sigma Kappa 
fraternity. 

Election* to the Informal Commute 

were held at the htajM Meet mil: also. 
The Senior niemhers elected were: 
.lames \V. Muer of Keadinu: Donald 
c Doaglami of Cambridge, Harland K. 

(iaskill of llopedale, and .John I). Snow 

of Arliagtoa. From the Junior clem 

the following men were elected : Ken- 
neth \V. Moody ol Brookllne; Uaorgel 

M. Thompson, .Jr.. ot l,eno\:aml Kied 
erick V. Wangfa ol Amherst. 



OUR OPPONENTS SCORES 

LAST SATURDAY 

WTOBCB8TEB TECB 9 

Conneticot Agricultural College *> 

NEW HAMPSHIHK 7 

Hoston 1'niversity " 

rurra o 

VERMONT 7 



Agricultural Conlerance. 
The first ol aaerlaaof conferences to 

he held on the campus during the fall 
look place in Siockhi id.ge Hall. It being 
a "Conference ill Women in \ u l i< nil lire 
and Country I, He Ahoiil 100 women 

were In attendance al tbetwo session*, 
represent Iiiii practically all nf the state 

..' Mani/.alioiis ol women. U>pi escnl a 
lives Ii'iun ihe local (iranges were also 
present , nnd large groups ol women in 

terested in raral life and agricultural 
pursuits, lids conference was held in 

coiuicclion with I he dedication ol ihe 
new women s dormiloiy. whnh l.ilin- 

ally marked tbe Introduction ol M. v.c. 
into tbe life oi women's collage*. The 
tiisi s. ssion met ai 2 (Hi r. vi . Thursday, 
in the Bowker Auditorium, and was de- 
voted mainly to addresses l.v women 
prominent la agulcnlture, end to a 

general discuss I ihe rural pioli- 

Icms oi the day. the program follows: 

(•..reword President Kei.yoii I.. Hill 

tetlicld. 
•'Vocations |..i Women in \gricul 

lure.'' Mrs. Krancis Kinu. Alma. 

Mich.. I'nsidenl Women's National 

Karm and (4srden issocialion, 
•personal K.vperienccs in A g i icull ure."' 

— Miss Nettie B. Bnrlelgb, Wonbalm 

Parol, Watcl ville. Me. 

\l us.ii . 

'The Transition in Uural Life from the 
family Kcgime In the (omniiinily 
Regime.' 1 Mr. C. .1 tialpin. Wa«h 
ingion, I), c. Boonomisl In Charge 
..I Raral Life si adiee, United siat.-s 
Department ol Agriculture. 

Bouad Tabic Discussion: •Women in 
Agricullure.'' Miss Kdna tjutter, 
Dractit. Mass. 
\, H-lo c. vi. Thursday evening. 
Ihe reception al I lie new dormitory, 
was held. It was highly attended 
by Women Student* and visitors Al- 
though the new building was not wind I v 

finished, the aea furniture, tbe gift ol 
lb* New England Breach of Para and 

Garden Association, was moved into Ihe 
pallors and living room, where the re- 
ception was held. 

The second session ol ll.e Conlclcnce, 
;»l 10. (HI v. vi. Friday, was the lormal 

dedication ol the new dormitory. Three 

Of Adel- ] huadred people, including many sta- 
l„.„ spoke .,., the loothallsilua- I denls ami townspeople, fille.l the audi- 
tion ' \t ...esenl, there are only three lorium, and WON Well repaid hy the line 
.quad, out on the Varsity gridiron. He | ceremony. President Hu.terlield pre- 
asked tor recruits from the three uppei ! sided and int. 
,. lasses. espec ally from I he Sophomores. 



ADELPHIA CONDUCTS 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Mackintosh, King, and Fuller Speak 
on Aggie Football Situation. 
Last Wednesday afternoon. October 
r>th, the asseml.ly. scheduled to he a 
Student Forum, transformed Itself into 
a varied meeting. Professor Waugh. 
head of the Department of Landscape 
Gardening, announced thai a fair would 
be held shortly on the campus, and 

asked the cooperation of the students 

as performers and guides. 

Adelphia then took charge ol the 
MSCmbly. Martin, editor-in-chief ..I 

lbe Colluoi a sashed thai tbe student 

body think over the idea of limiting 
the activates of any student to a certain 

number of credits, as the question 

would he put to ■ vote in the near 
future. Mackintosh, President 



King, veteran Varsity 

traditions of the college. Tht 
used to be, "Collegf 



lineman 

ahoiit the 

slogan al Aggb 

first, (lasses next, fraternity third.' 

Now the slogan seams tabs, "fraternity 

lirst." The old "pep " is disappearing, 
and the Sophomores are 
their duty of moulding the class of 1»24 ture 
into an aggregation worthy of being j CO 
I Continued on p»u« ■ 



Positions Open for Two Sophomores 
and Five Freshmen. 

Tb* annual competition lor positions 
on the Coiiii. iv\ bonrd opens Oct. 16 
at midnight and judging Hoin the ina- 
lerlal present In both Fre*bman and 

Sophomore classes. M Ueeli competition 

is anlicipaic.l. 

The competition will extend up to 

and include the last issue ol the second 

term, wbirh will probabl) he in the first 
part oi Maid.. The po*it ion* open are: 
Kdltorisl stall, one Sophomore, three 
Freshmen; business staff, one Sopho- 
more, two Freshmen. 

This yeai l.iings manv changes in the 

rules. For ellglblllij lo election to the 

business Staff. ■ minimum ..I 80 credits 
will be required. These may be oh 
lafued hj oiTnc work, routine work, m 

b] ol. laming ad v. Itislng. On* CT*dlt 

will be given for each two hours' work. 
1 1 is stipulated in I he rules i hat a I least 

one credit shall I al ncd foi the oh 

tainaiicc oi advertising. t>OS point will 

ne gi ven lol ca. n > in .. in. inch Of new 

Advertising or each two rolumn inches 

ol renew, d advel tisin^;. 

The editorial department requires a 
minimum of 2ft credit*, tine credit will 

he given lol leading one ol several 

i,o..ks used i.y the Rural Journalism d* 

|,:iii n i. \ i|iii//. based upon Ihis 

reading will lie given to the competi- 
tor! ; ,i t he end ill ten weeks. It t be 

candidate shows a siilh. i.nl knowledge 

oi the subject, be will i>e credited wiih 

• pot at. \ maximum ol live credits 

will be given tor office work or prool 
reading al the late ol one point lol each 

two hours. I he major! tj of Ihs credits 

must be earned hy news article* lunied 
in and actually used. 'The material lor 
the** must be obtained Independent ol 

the assignments made to Ihe regulal 
st;ilT. Credit at I he rale ol one point lol 
each six column inches o| new inal< rial 
and lol each seven inches ol "rewille' 

msterial. (me general aaslgnmenl will 
be made to tbe competitors each week. 

The beat an Ide ol those turned in will 
he printed ami the author thereof will 

ie. eive I he credit for it. 

When a candidate obtains ihe mini 

ilium requirement In credits, it merelj 
renders him eligible for election. Tbe 

hoard reserves the nghl to withhold 
elect ion. 

Elections will be held immediately 
following thC last issue o| the second 
term A hi weekly Statement ol i' 
v'ulual standings will be printed it. tbl 
Col I I «. I V \ col Uinns. 



els. among whom were t he .leans of the 
principal women's institutions ol New 
Kugisnd. Mr. ttleason. v*lce-Presiden( 

Of ihe Board Ol Trustees ot I he College 
upon presenting President HuMcrfield 
wilh the keys ot the building, congrat- 
ulated him on his excellent Work, and held their annua 
neglecting | wished hitn success la I he furl her ven- nlty ot II. A. < 

hich he may anticipate foi the house, last Ki iday evening al h o'clock 
liege, The p rogram follows: The gathering was an informa" 

[Continued on page ■ 1 



President's Reception to the Facnlty. 

President and Mlv K I.. Hutlcilield 
ecept ion lo Ihe la. 
at the President's 



and a pleasant evening 



vv a- en io v nl 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 




M. Novick & A.Warren 



MEN'S TAILORS 



SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Also Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing and Repairing 

— Work done while you wait — 
Work called for and delivered 

Dress Suits for Rent 

S. S. HYDE 

jeweler itixl Oi»Clol« »«» 

1H Pleasant Street 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing 

Promptly and Skilfully Done 

Satisfaction liuaranteeil 

THE M1LLETT JEWELRY STORE 

College Jawelry Cm* Uaks.Befl Coltof Plae, 

Drew Suit Sets. Violin. Can jo. Mandolin HtrinifB 

Fine Watch Repairing, kite Broken Lentet 

Keplaceil 1'roinntly. 



32 Main Street. 



Amherst, Mass. 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILK YOU WAIT 



AMERICAN CIVIC ASSOCIA- 
TION TO MEET HERE 

Annual Convention Coming to Camp- 
us Oct. 14, 15. and 16. 

A^uotable event i* promised In n>« 

coning ol tbe l«tb annual convention 

,,i the American Civic Aesoclatloa to 

this campus. Being ha\d Oct. 14, 16, 

ami Hi, it is t be eeeosd and perhapethe 

moat Important event in the eertee ot 

agricultural and country life confer- 

bbom to be held on Ihe campni thia 

fall, ii» celebration of what President 

Butterfield has termed the "Jubilee" 

of the college. Tb* htaesachuaetti 

SUte Grange and the .Massachusetts 

federation ot Town Planning Boardi 

will hold Joint sessions during tbe eon- 

rent ion, and (be American Country 

i, it,. Association will alao Join la the 

convention on Saturday, Oct. L6. 

Profcaeor ITaugb, obairman of tbe 
semi-centennial eommlttee, roporie tbal 
oonntry planning la to be tbe main 
theme for discussion a) tbe eonvnuUou. 
The Americaa Clvie haeootatloa have 

hitberto si »l of tbetr lime In city 

planning, but ate now applying tbaae 
Ideai rot fit > beautlfleatlon t<> tbe 
country as well. H hi hoped tbal tbe 
convention will greatlv promote this 
wuik of eountry planning. 

Some of tbe notable epeaken on tbe 
program for the convention are: Dr. 
Albert Shaw, editor of the Bevtcw e/ 
Reviews; Col. William B. Greeley, 
chief ol Ibe V. S. Forest Service! 
Stephen T. Mather, director Naiional 

Parks; Thomas Adams, Town Flannel 
„, Canada; .1. Horace hteFariaad of 
Barrieburg, Pa., praeWent of the aeeo- 

eiatioti ; Mis. Thomas G. Winter of Min- 
neapolis, president of I he General led- 
elation ol W. .men's Clubs: George 0. 
Diehl. Blgbwa] Commissioner for the 

American Antomobile Association 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 

1920 TO 1923 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - - Mass. 



COP : TE NEW STOCK 

Shoes, Boots, Rubbers 

Expert Repair Work Done 

Shoe Shine Stand 



J. G1NSBURG, 19 Pleasant Street I 



S 
H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



Among tbe various eubjoete to be dis- 
cusaed are : 

DOCS a Nation Nee<l Naiional Parks? 

Preserving the Scenic Integrity of out 

National Possessions. 

The National tforeata. 

Planning the industrial Village. 

The Grange in neighborhood Improve- 

meat. 
The Parmer's interest in Good Beads. 
A pari of the convention which should 

j. rove very Interacting locally is the 
typical county fair which is being 
planned. Trot. F. 0* Sears is general 
chairman of thia, with the assistance of 
Professors dark Thayer and \V. \V. 
Chenoweth. The exhibits to the model 
lair will be contributed by the Horticul- 
tural Division ol the college and will 
include fruits, vegetables, flowers, pre- 
serves and jellies, and forest products. 

The student elubela Pomology, Land- 
scape Gardening, Floriculture and Veg- 
etable Gardening will manage the expo- 
sition, and the undergraduate organic- 
Bttons are planning a midway of their 
own to add 10 the realism of the fair. 
In peal years, separate shows have been 
held at various times during the college 
year, prepared by student clubs and 
open to the public. The fair will com- 
bine all the club shows, with conse- 
quent added interest by the whole stu- 
dent body and visitors. 




APIPE'S the thing with men. Under the spell of 
W D C Pipes men relax, fagged brains are relieved. 
The specially seasoned genuine French briar breaks in sweec 
and mellow. It will not crack or burn through 1 he 
W D C Triangle on the bowl is your guarantee. Ask any 
good dealer. 
WM. DEMUTH & CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLDS LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 



Jiidg/ove 




?7o/inM l £eacan. 



VARSITY ELEVEN MEETS 

W. P. 1. ON SATURDAY 

Maroon and White Seems Due for a 
Win at Worcester. 
In spile Of the fact tbal Worcester 

Polytechnloal [netltute has a better ag- 
gation than last year, ■ summary of 
lie game* so fat ihis year point to 
kggte'i favor Pot the iii*t lime in sev- 
eral yean tbe W. P. [.squad Is betas. 

,,. ached by llarvaid coaches, and is 

using Harvard plays. Blake and Lan- 
or, who played on the Harvard Var- 
sity las! year are coaching the team. 

I he line-up is about i he same as last 
yeat a*itb a few new men. Fielder play- 
ing, fullback, and Manning, left tackle, 

have both been playing good names 
this year. \V. P. 1. has played tWO 

aes this year. <>■> Oct. 8, ihey lost 

to H. V . 7-i». As Boeton Uulveraltj is 

cited as bavins, one of ibe best 

earns around Boston, i be fact i bat W.I'. 

I. held them 7-0 speaks well for the 

Worcester team. Last Saturday, Oct. 

», W. P. I. defeated < ennect iciil Aggie 
'•ii. The fact that If. A. C. defeated 

Connection! on the week proceeding 88-0 

promisee well lor another \ooj,. win 
next week. The Worcester team is us 

no Harvard plays and has a particu- 
lar! J Strong line with alairlv decent 

hackheld. 

I tic loss oi Ifansell, who suffered a 

irokec elbow during the Bates game, 

which will probably result In his not 

Bins, able to play lOl the rest of the 

-mi has been a severe blpu lo the 

Igglc team. However, I he fact thai 

m. A. C. defeated W. P. I. last yeai ■!■>■ 

nd the result of the W. P. 1 Coo- 

! nil t game ol last week seems to 

-how thai iht prospects tot a good score 
iggie at Worcester, Oct. 10, are by 

■ ., means unfavorable. 



HILL AND DALE MEN START 
TRAININC FOR 1920 SEASON 

Thirty Candidates Out for Varsity- 
Cross-country Team. 

Cross-country season started last week, 
and practice for the (cam is now well 
underway. Thirty men, lueludlog nine 

Freshmen, showed up during the Bral 

four days. Boll! OS, Slate, and West of 
last year's team will form a nucleus for 
the squad, while oilier men showing 
promise are: Hooper '§9, and Wood- 

worth, HncCready, Irish, and Tanner 

'88, For the Freshmen, Woodwott h and 

Hill are showing good form. Bo eroaa- 

OOUntry captain has as yd been elected 
for Ihis season. 

Oct. Jo, one week before the lirsl 

ii t, there leto bean Interelass con- 
teat, which will serve a lime trial 
for the candidates. The scheduled, as 
planned now, is as lollows : 

Oct, 80. W. P. I. vs. M. A. C, at Wor- 
cester. 

Nov. 8. V II. Stale vs. If. A. C, :*• 

Amherst. (Pending.) 

Nov. 18. — New Bnglaad Interoolleglatee, 

al Franklin I'ark, BoatOU. 

tfov. SO.— Springfield vs. M. A. <., al 
Springfield. 

Coach Dickinson started coaching the 
men last Friday, Oct. X. and they went 
iato training OB Monday. Thirty can- 
diadtei is a very good nuinhcr wilh 
which to beglfl the season, and wilh 
the material which there is (o work 
wit h. a very creditable learn is expected 
to represent M.A.C. h> I he I ime of I lie 
lirsl meet on Oct. 150. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 
GRANGE STORE 

Fine (iroceries 
Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Stkphkn Lank I oi.«.kk. inc. 

MANIT»Cl'l'HIN(l JHWKI.KRN 

im bkoaowat, wsbw yobb 

OXATB ANli OOULtMam 
1'INN AMI KINliH j» 

UOI.lt, nll.VICH ANI) HRONZI MIIUI.K 



OWN HA La- 



Thursday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Friday 

Mat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Saturday 

Nat. at 3 

Eve. I Shows 

6-45. 8-30 



DotUlat HacLean sad Dorli 
Hay in"Nary'* Ankle." TlM 
■tars oi ".'.ii Hours' Lsavs,"!a 
Mai i 'ally's celebrated stacs 
merest, So funm u will 
keep \ou i.iuuiiitiu tor days. 



Pathe Newt 
Topicf 



Hutt end Jeff 
Comedy 



Monday 






Nazimova in "The Irat." 
in 7 iparkllng reals. l-'rum 
Maude Pulton's ■tssv H " r 
. ess Different froai aai 
thing Naslmovs has s»« 

llollC 

Scenic real 

I oil Christie Comedy 

Viola Dana in "Dangerous 
to Men, "i mm Bsaionit'l t • 1 - » > 
" Bites i nines to Mai " The 
sdventnresof aa orphan girl 

t In list Into ii l>:o In- lois BOOSS 
hold. 

"Hidden Dangeri," serial 
Pathe News Comedy 

Republican Kallv 

\u PICTUUH 



PROMINENT ALUMNI SPEAK 

AT SEMI-CENTANNIAL 

Grads of Different Decades Talk On 
"The College Of My Day." 

'The College of My Day," was the 

tuple for the Alumni re pres entatives 
i live deeadee, at the Beml«Oentennlal 
itheriag In Bowker Autltorium. <>»■- 

ruber 8, at 8-80 p. m. 

I.'i present at ive's of caeb decade in the 

istorv of at. a. C. spoke, and gave the 

indergraduates aa Interesting resume 

the growth ol "Old Aggie." Among 

balf-forgotten events thai were 

entioued, the building ot South Dor- 

iiiiory and (be victory once the Har- 

i l.l CTCW ill the Connecticut Blvet 

were prominent. 
Or, B. B. Smead, of Greenfield, a 

nl.er of the I'hnicer Class of 1*71. 

e presented the Brat decade. Dr. 

oi ha- been, until recently, I'resi- 
I ..I the Watkinsoii Farm School, ot 

ill ford, Conn. 

The other decade Were represented 
I>r J. 11. I.indsey '86, head of the 

m la try Department ol M, A.I .: I>r. 

S. Bacoa *94, :i Bpriagfield, Maes., 

scfan; Mr. Snmngr B. Parker IM, 

retarv of the Alumni Aaeociation, 

J a count; agJicuItvral teacher; and 

K. c. Edwards '14, manager ol the 

.: ;i"-,johnson Company, of Boeton. 

meetiii" was presided over by 
- dent Hutterliebl. assisted b] I>r. 

kerman, Dr. Peters ami Mr. Be- 
ige!, members of the Alumni Bzeco- 
Committee, Howard at. Qoff '81, 
ibe singing, and Loreeco Fuller '21. 
beerins. 



BUT THREE HUNDRED SUB- 
SCRIPTIONS FOR SQUIB 

Following the recent call f or compet- 
itors, tbe 8quib annonneeatbai tbe fol- 
lowing membera of 1 U- J4 had slgolfled 
their intentions of oomfag out for the 

various departments: Editorial —at. 

uiiss, f. Bruaner, s. ii. llacafae.S. 11. 

While. \\ . \V. W I. and F. llarteaux : 

Art It. Noyes, I). (I.. Maca.ilay. 

1: Hall, c s. Tobey, and B. Darliog; 
Buslncm E. Bike, ll. K. Wetherwax, 
F. Carpenter, and it. a. Barrowa. 

The call lot subscriptions netted less 
than three hundred favorable replies. 

,\ personal canvass ot ever] member of 

the student body will be made during 

ibis week by members and Competitors 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 
LKARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 

All good fertilizer! make crops Brow. 

HIGGINS' MAKES THEM GROW BEST 

(VVr don't advertise we're just telling you). 

HIGGINS 'OT RUSSELL M» 

Deuel's Drug Store 



toi 



tiii board. Contributions for 



botb the art and editorial departments 
will be made at the same lime. The 
alumni will be canvassed by mail al 
the same lime. 

The exchange list ol tbe Sgvib now 
Includes ibiiiv-iive publications of a 
ho morons nature from other colleges. 



Frank Buell le engaged 

r at 20 Broad St.. New York 



BAND ORGANIZES 

Tweaty-tWO men reported lot the hist 
band practice which was held Thurs- 
day nlgbl in tbe Social Union, inatru* 
ments were furnished bj tbe Btlltarj 
department to tboCC Wbo did mil bring 
their own. Frequent practices will be 

held and Baj Swift, wader, la expecting 

to have a liist class organisation in 
shape tot the New Hampshiie geme. 
Those reporting for rehearsal are as 

follows: eorneie, Halter, Noyce, l.in- 

r|iiist. Woodworth. Mosely : clarinets, 
Morse, Fuller, ilaslatn. Salmon ; irom- 
bonee, Efeleon, Kennedy, Smith ; saxo- 
phones, Howes, Adams; alio horns, ftf, 
M. Smith, King, Cahlll; drums, Dun- 
bar. Donne. Murray; baritone, a. L. 
Smith : bass horn. Hay 8v 



TOIL 



ARTICLES 



Shaving Stichs and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



l^aKe 9 ^ Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 
MOEANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 

a* 

Manufacture™ institution Cooking Apparatus 

86 WASHINGTON ST. - BOSTON 



C&rp*n-ter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 







THE WASSACHISETTS COLLEGIAN 

Pabllebed every Wednesday by the 
Student! <>f the Maueaebueette Ag- 
ricultural College. 

KOABU OF BDITORS- 



II,,. matter is now In the bauds «f the 
student body to give II H"-' 1 tupport. 
The sum asked is small nnd the return 
is lame. In ngreelng lo pay tbni sum 
,1,,. individual will piece hli vote either 
,,„• ,„• agntnel the future existence of 

i In- Hquib. A siillicient nuniher of votes 
e?illglve~U the necessary IW« blood to 
live. What is your vote.' 



| 4II1 ksu I'. M. ■». K.lit..ri..-<hief 

i, m u Jones --M Nnnnalna ■*"» 

ashociaik. KoiToaa. 
qbomii * Son vn "- 1 

KIMRI A. lUllNAItl. V 

ft , M KV W. lll;..MI.K\ 1H 
I'M I. I.. Bl i:nki I 'J-' 

HtlBARI W. iPniKfl ft 

IlKi.MMi f. •' M KHUN '•-I' 
JOHN M Willi lini "■ 
I.. II. \i:i:i^<.i"N "■ 

Buarnaea DarAumiaMT. 

II. u I.. Uk.k.i --M. Knsi h Manager 

BvKHtrn < Pksstoji -*1 aOertlslns Naaaaer 

Cbakmm A. Bl-CS W linuUti..,, Y1;.i.:tKer 

MVRON «.. Ml SRA> "-"-' 

||,. I I.KN W "I" IAKKK '-':( 

dwh a i •■!*">' '- :< 



Supply and Demand. 
la n diminutive article on oneol the 
inside pagea may be found ""' •"•'»'" : >- 

tioii I hat the student labor of tbiscol- 
luge la no longer t<> be paid at rates 
which were prevalant dm in- (lie pre- 
historic ayes in labor elrclea. The 

slight increase whieh lias heeii granted 
Ibow privileged tew who are allowed 

ihe delectable pleasure of working their 
w;lv through college is indeed gratify 

,„„, The good Old law Of supply and 
demand is icnislerinn its usual wallop 
hi ;, manner whieh comes close to home. 



Subscription W.OO per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

1„ ease of Change Of address, sub- 
■criberswill please notify the business 

manager as aooa as poeeihle. 

gtereiae e ei m i t * «1 — aMlterattns v.nhei.t 

poit office, accepted f»r mUtee « •*•*«*! 
rate ..f pastaa* stot KM tot in wctton ties, A.l 

Of o.tol.ei. mi ;.Mtl....i/e.l Ailllll»tW. tats. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

\Vh:i.m:si>av, (mtoiikk Kl. 

:5.tHi i-. m. Assembly. Mr. -I Horace 

M.l'ailand, Harrisburg. Pa., 
President American (ivie 

\s^oci:ition. 



Educational Material. 
In e| idag M. A- C. as the im-eiiim 

place for their sixteenth annual cooven- 

Hon, the American Civic Ucsoclutiofl 
h;is paid this college a dlsttncl eomplt- 
ment. Acting upon the urgenl Invlta 
Hon ot Professor Prune A. Wnngh and 
l,i„ associates, the society is lo apend 
the eexl Ihree days In a diseussioe ot 

country plnnnlng in its national, state, 
and community aspects. This -roup ot 
men ami women ha\c been associated 

together la the past for the purpose ot 

promoting such projects as our national 
park systems, stale park systems, and 
general dele improvrmunta. Their suc- 
cess is a mutter »l history . 

They are coming t«> M. A. < to dis- 
cuss the improvement of the country 

along with the elty, In connection 

with their convention, the combined 
horticultural clubs are to stage Ihelr 

annual show. The American Counliy 
l, lf ,. Aeeoclatlon will hold a joint ses- 
tion with the Civic Association, as will 

the Massachusetts Federation ot Town 

Planning Hoards, other cooperating 
organisation! are the Massachusetts 
state Grange and the Massachusetts 
Department of Agriculture. 

The sum total of these various con- 
ic, dices will present a slnpemlous 
amount oi educational material which 
the student l.ody cannot afford to ne- 

" led . 



Till KSftAI , O* TOniCll 14. 

American Civie Association 

Conference. 
K i : 1 1 . \ \ . <>i lorn ■ 16. 
-, in v. u.— Chapel. 

\nieiican Civic Association 
( oiiterenee. 

Ul vision of Horticulture 
(on nly Fair. French 1 1 ill I 
I. eel inc. 
S vn i;i>vv . (»« loitit: IS. 

3 iiu r . vi. Varsity foothall. M. A. C. 
vs Worcester Polytechnic In- 
stitute at Worcester. 

:l-(M) I". M. Fieshniiin foothall, If. A. 
< . N> Diiltou High School. 
Alumni Field. 

American Civic Association 

Conference. 

Division <>t Horticulture 

County Mr, French Hall 

lawn. 
7 ;;u p. vi. chemisiiv Club Meeting. 

sishav, Ootobkh 17. 

Division of Horticulture, 

County Fair. French Hall 
lawn. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

C. Fuller '20 was back on lae 'anipus 
over the week-end. 

Howard T. Hoemer *», comes from 

Greenfield and was last year a student 
at Norwich I' diversity . 

Dick Smith '17 and Bill GtUShlu ex- 
l'.t were hack on the campus for the 
week end 

tteuel W. Khlridge. who entered with 
the class of ItSO, is hack In college this 
year in the class of 102:1. 

Melvin B. Hallett of Koekland, an ex- 
21 man, is back in college as a tegu- 
lar student in the elate of IMS. 

Clifton scott "20, now teaching at 
Ashlield, was hack for the Hates game 
Saturday. He will return to college 
Boat term to complete his coute. 

The lawn heside French Hall assumed 

the appearance of circus grounds Mon- 
day afternoon, when Ihe tenis of the 
••>!. \. ( . County Fair'' were put up. 
John A. Crawford fjo. managing edi- 

torof the IttOCOM KiHAN, and now on 

the reporting staff of ihe Springfield 
RepueHena, a»ade ■ Bylug visit to the 
eampne last Sunday, <>et. H> 

The Landscape Club met in Wilder 
Hall Thursday last for the election of 
Officers. Jonathan H. Smith off Uoslin- 
dnle was elected president and Phillip 
1,. Kohinson of New Hedford secretary 
and treasurer. 

Clifford Woodworth Keith, a memher 
ot the Sophomore class, recently trans- 
ferred from Rhode Island State College, 
has l.een pledged to Theta <h i f raler- 
niiv. The fraternity has also pledged 
Homer Flint Kichards of Beading, re- 
cently transferee! from M. I. T. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel I. Howditch 
of Pramlngham Center, were present at 
the Women's Agricultural Conference 
last Thursday and Friday. Mr. How- 
.litch is on aeveral of the Standing com- 
mittees of the college corporation, and 
one of the best known Guernsey l.reed- 
en la the country. 

The registration of short course stu- 
deoU enrolled at the short office is as 
follows : 

Two Tear Course (excepting Federal 



UNITY CHURCH 

HENRY G. IVES, Minister 

Invites you to its home life. 

Come and get acquainted. 

No creedal tests. 



SUNDAY PREACHING SERVICE, 
10-45 A. M. 

SONG AND PICTURE SERVICE. 
7-30 P. M. 



Students' Reception 

TUESDAY, OCT. 19 



8-00 P. M. 



7-40 \. 



Old 



liein^ 
South 



Mo\i»\v, Oi ror.i t: 18, 

m. Cbnpel. 

Ti i>i> v\ • "« 'oi;i i: 19. 
Tir. p. m. -Senate meeting, 

Chapel. 
WKDRCeDAI . Oi ror.i i: 80. 
8-OU p. a.— Assembly, ipenher t«> i»e 

announced. 



111 

•I'i. 

If 

838 



The Squil). 
I'hc personnl canvass now 

made tor the benefit of the 
should receive the material a* upport of 

the entire student body. The Hqmtb hj 

;,n attempt oa the pari "i an inspired 
few 10 create and permanently estubllsfa 
a bumorous monthly of collegiate grade 
on the campus. These men have no 
tbouabt of personal ROln, but are turn- 
infl their few profits into a common 
fund which will be used as a reserve 
against future troubles. They have 
foregone (be customary banquet at the 
end of the season, to further provide 
funds. Indlvldunls bnve personally 
■ubecrilmd monej l« further keep the 
Squib on its feel • 



The co-ed division off the class of H*'2»> 
was hack in full force at the game with 
Hates College Inst Saturday. <>ct. 9. 



ALLAN LEON POND 

MEMORIAL FUND 

Last June <|iiile a nuniher of the 

undergraduates requested that op- 
portunities to subscribe t<> the Pond 

Memorial Fund should he allowed 
in the fall. 

l wish t<> announce for the com- 
mittee that such an opportunity 
now exists. 

(Signed,) ll anoi u at. Gona. 



Hoard students) 
Federal Hoard, 
Unit Course. 

Vocational Poultry Course, 

Total nuniher in Short Courses. 

Major K. T. Walker of the Military 
D ep a r t men t h as received the Inforroa- 
,iun that Major Frederic S. Snyder. 
C. S. Cavalry, has been ordered here to 
eaalet him In his duties as instructor 
and head of the department. There 
are now 17 men on duty here who were 
sent from a cavalry detach merit at 
(amp Daren*. These men will assume 
various duties as soon as the quota of 
horses arrives, and are now assisting in 
,he clerical work. They will also act 
as assistant instructor of tactics. 
Honor Council Elects. 
m a recent meeting of the honor 
t . u , im . n ,-. .|, Coscto Off Willi. nantie. 
(„„„. was elected president and 9. V. 
Cook of Niantic, Conn., secretary. DUT- 
| B g the meeting committees reported on 
the distributee Off copies Of the Honor 
System constitution and hy-laws and 
the explanation of same to the Fresh- 
man class. It w-assueuesiedthatafew 
,„■,„,„• cbsDgefl in the constitution and 
bylaws be brought before tb* student 
body for action at some near future 
dale. 
Reception to the Class of 1024. 
The annual reception to the Fresh- 
man .lass took place at the home of 



There's Just One 100$ Efficient 

Cream Separator 

am- i ha i's run 

01 LAVAL 

For Forty Years the World's Standard 

There may be a naif-dozen plows, wagon" 
traitors, aiitos or other farm equipment t" 
choose between, but no would-be lraltatoi 
or utilizer of expired l)e 1-aval patentB has 
yet produced a cream separator comparable 
with the l>e I.aval. 

Klret in the beginning, lie (Aval BSMasUM 
have led in every step of cream separat": 
improvement and development. g«MI fSSl 
has piesented some new feature or better 
ment. and the 1920 machine! are still bettci 
than they have ever been before. 

If you haven't seen or tried a ne* 
Da 1 aval ma< hine. any local agent will N 
glad lo afford you the opportunity to <1" - 

If you don't know the nearest De Lava! 
local agent simply address the nearest mai:. 
office, as below. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPAN. 

166 Broadway 29 K. Madiion St. 61 Beale t« 
New York Chicago San Francis"' 

50 000 Branches and Local Agencies 
the World Over 






THOMAS F. WALSH 

COLLEGE OUTFITTER 

Haberdashery Clothing 1 Tailoring 



President and Mrs. K. I.. Htitteilield 
last Saturday, at 9 f\ ah In addition 
to the formal reception a social hour 
was passed, daring which several col- 
lege soiiK'* were sunic and lclreshinenls 

were enjoyed. If embers oi the Seeloi 

class acted as aids. 

Junior Class Elections. 

The Junior class held Its class elec- 
tions after asseinhlv, Wednesday. Del. 

(i. Albert \V. smith oi Baetbnmptoa, 

wan elected to the oMIce of president. 
Smith la a memher oi the college Sen- 
ate, played varsity basketball last \c;u. 

and lias heen on 10gg basketball, base- 
ball and tenuis teams. George II 
Thompson of Lenox was elected sicc- 

preeident. He area a member oi the 

varsity haskelhall team last winter, and 
lias heen manager of tin* li»22 track 

team. Sflaa Rath H order oi afnttapaaj 

was re-elected sei-reiary of the claaa, 
The other election*, vwic Matthew .1. 
Murdock. of Hedford, treasurer; Joha 

N. I.ewandowski. ol Ka>' liamplnu. cap- 
tain; and .lames K. I .eland of Slierhoiu, 

sergeant-nt-nrois. 

Try -outs tor tliis years dice L'lnb wen- 
held last eight in Ihe Social Union 
room. A very success! u I teason is ex- 
pected. Harlan Worlhley, leader ol 
last year's UleeClab, and Howard t.oll. 
the present leader, will coach the prom- 
>iim material which has already ap- 
peared. Kesulls of the < luh try-oiils 
and also the Musical ( 1 n Its schedule 

lor the ooaaing year will be announced 

later. 

The Chapel Choir, an instil ut ion ot 
pre-war days, will be revived with the 
next Sunday morning chapel ot Nov 
emher 7. 



ASSEMBLY 

< oiitinued fnun p;u:e ll 

Annie men. They ihouldsee that the 
Froah obey all the rules of t he Senate. 

Puller, manager of ihe Varsity eleven. 

was the next and last speaker. lie 
Mid that the squad out for foothall this 
.i is the smallest in several years. 
He uave a resume of lasl year's eleven. 
and told various anecdotes eoneertnR 
ihe way in which Ihe student hody used 
<• send off its foothall me n . The "gip" 

teems to be Ineking this year. At ihe 

name with Conneetleal last Saturday 

itternoon, the cheerinu was weak at 

limes. The eheerH ought to he known 

every Annie man. so that they can 

Jved in unison. 

Then Kendall, President of the Senate. 

presided at a short mass meeting, 

< .unphell. Secretary of the Memorial 

Building Fund, urged all students that 

had not paid their pledges up to date to 

-o at once, if the construction ol the 

building ifi not to he retarded. Webster, 

editor-in-chief of the Bkfufft, asked the 

itdents to subscribe to the humorous 

• ntlily. Golf, leader of the Musical 

1 luhs, led tbeassemhly in tinging some 

' the College songs. Fuller then had 

tome of the cheers giveo which showed 

it the Aggie "pep", though dormant 

times has not yet n ,,n e out of ei I 

•nee. 









* , 




18.— U. T. Koehrs has taken a poti- 
>a with the Colnmia Graphopbona 

<o., having charge of their lumher de- 
irtment. He expects shortly to lo- 
cate in Baltimore, Md. 



\, 






m 



/ 







Modern Motive Might 

MOUNTAINS, miles and minutes give 
way befo»<.' c lectncity, the magic mo- 
tive power. Properly applied, it drives giant 
locomotives across the continental divide, 
tows ocean liners through the Panama Canal, 
or propels huge slips. 

Through good light, safe signals, and illumin- 
ated highways.it is making travel better and 
safer and also is increasing the usefulness of 
transportation methods on land, sea or in 
the air. 

In short, electricity is revolutionizing trans- 
portation, making it quicker, safer, more eco- 
nomical and reliable in all sorts of weather. 

And back of this development in electric 
transportation, in generating ;-nd transmit- 
ting apparatus as well as motive mechan- 
isms, are the co-ordinated scientific, engi- 
neering and manufacturing resources of the 
General Electric Company, working to the 
end that electricity may better^ 
serve mankind 



©EM I CTMe COM IFAMY 



t 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 



MANSELL, VARSITY END, 

SUSTAINS BROKEN ARM 

Tin- injury l<. Klton -I ■ ('•Sunny") 
Mansell '91 in the Biitcs iMint' l:i*l Sat- 
urday, «le|. rives Aggtd ol ,l "' s, ' inU '' s "' 
li.-i slarend «.l lasl season. for the ni'M 
l, w weeks and niayhe for the remainder 
ol I he >easoll. 

Mansell, wImi was injured in the see 
ond quarter, sustained a fraelure ol the 
elbow, dislocating the ell.ow in the 
I. leak. lie was reino\ed to the Infirm- 
ary, where he is at piesent resting eoni- 

lortai.iy. lie will probably be (oread 

to remain I here tor several days. Dr. 
Daniels is in attendance. 



1922 INDEX 



Work on the [Ml Iii'ltr, undei the 
direction of Kditor-in-eliief Jackson and 
Kiisiness Manager Sprint:, is being ii»r- 
ried on in a fashion which insures the 

a|.|iearance of the publication by the 

lirsl of April The engraving is to he 
done liy the .lahn A Ollel Co. <'f 
Chicago. The liisl shipment for en- 
•jraviim is to he sent in to the engraver 
today. A representative of tin- White 

Studio Will !>» the campus inahout 

ten dayi to take the remaining pictures 
for th« book. Ilervey Law '11 will be 
readv to receive subscriptions for the 

booh alter Oet. ttth. 

RAISE IN MINIMUM WAGE 

The m'-nnnum stage rata ;n M. A. ( . 

,„ lslll dcnt lahor has been raised from 
r. t io M cents an hour. All student 
lahor on the campus isalfected hy this 
change. Students workin- in the Din- 
ing ball will '"' "'aicrially alfecte.l b) 

,|,is change. 1 a«M the number of 

,„„„•* labor will be decieascl lioin M 
,„ :i little ovei >:\ BOOrs. V" impro%e- 
„„.,„ „, , |,.s kind has been expected for 
some time at Aggie, and all student 
laborers are eagerly waiting turlher in 
creases 



Bjr'SO. Kenneth V. Wtighl ol Ail 

Ingtoa Heights was eerionsl) injured 

ta»1 week-end when the ear in which 

he was ridiag collided with a motor- 
cycle on the Hosionl.ynn road. He 
was severely cut about the head and 
anns :»■«! his ski.il is believed to hi 

fractured. Be is-", the daagei list at 

the l.v mi hospital. 

DEDICATION OF DORMITORY 

( 'uiitituieil fnMB PM« I 



Music. 

UreeUngB. Prom Repreaaautiaea «»f 
tbe New England Collegei at which 

Women ale in Attendance. 
Music 

Address.- MU- Barah Louise Arnold, 
Dean Kmerlttte, Simmons Collage, 
Boh ton. 

Presentation ol Key>. Mi. V. A. Ulaa- 

„,,„. Vice -President <>f the Hoard ol 
Trustees. 
taeaptaJM* of Keys. -President Kenyon 
I,. Hutteltield. 
The dormitory is to be known as 

Abigail Adams Hall The dedication 

...a.ked the close ol , he contest for the 

name of the balldiog, which was open 

,,,all Massachusetts -iris. The pThM 
„f |86 was awarded to Miss Margate! 
Klines ol Medliebl High School, whose 
r l,. V ei letter to the trustees, explaining 
her Choice, intluenced them in theit de- 
cision. Abigail A. lams was the well 
known wile of one Pnited States presi- 
dent , ami t he mot her of another. she 
was one ol the foremost women of her 
lime, and was especially interested in 
country life, so that the name is very 
appropriate for this college. 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing |p r atemity Men 

Take Notice ! 



Shorn 

Repairing 



Shorn 
Shim 



T. MIENTKA'S 

TKY- 

C. H. GOULD 

for lirst-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleasant St.. Amherst. Mass. 



Rush all l-'reshmen with DRURY'S 

Rolls, Doughnuts and 
Pastry 



W. B. DRURY 



in Main Si ., 



A in hf i st 



F. M- THOMPSON & SON 

GOOD CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN 

Leather Coats 

Corduroy Vests 

Guyer Hats 

Hart Schaffner and Marx Clothes 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DKALKRfl IN 



DRV AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers 



mo u.s. p*t. orr . 



Will help you secure "a greater yield lrom 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

,u,in- r a, tmc mumn »o»icultub«>. BUmiMl co«.»«v 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



ALUMNI 

Ainunn tlie alumni seen at the Hates 
KUM Saturday weir Clifton Sci.tt 'JO, 
Mmun Bpauldlng 17, JaliSB l{ea lit, 
Frank Huell '15. Miller .Ionian l:(, ami 
(leorge Zabrleki, lnd,'18. 

i:i.— George Zabriakle 8d, is engaged 
is a contraottng freight ageni with the 
Chleago Great Western railroad at 28<i 
Broadway, New fork. 

'It, Miller Jordan is returning U> 

Miialoa, Mexico wit hin two \\eek>. In 

all probability be will return to large 
scale ranch lag. 

'18. — II. K Jones la now Junior vice- 
|. resident, treasurer and general mana- 
ger of the United Sugar companies ol 

Los Mocllis, Blnaloa, Mexico, one ol the 

largest producers oi refined sugar In 

Mexico. 

'17.— Biebard smith was a welcome 

visitor on the cam pus Sat unlay. 

'80.— Charles M. Boardmaa is land* 
ncape architect for tbe Moon Nurseries 

ii Morrisville, I'a lie maintains that 
the hardest tiling he does is to liud 

omeibing to do. 

BX-'SO. Kenneth V. Wrlgbl is -ale- 
man with the Louisville Food Products 
< o. ol 118 Lincoln St., Boston. 

K\-'2L— Orville S|.encer is with the 
Swift Corporation. 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 

II. H. Brown "20. Williams Colli 
niie the 8000 meter champion of tin- 
world at the Olympic (lames in Ant- 
■ 1 1>. Belgium. 

One eollegi tbe American Conti- 

enl at least has Keen so atlei ted b] 

the meager recompense given Instruct- 

rs that it baa been forced to close up. 
\t the Prince of Wales College In Char- 

■town, I". K. L, a college run hy the 

Canadian Qorernmeot, the halls were 

■d indefinitely ami the students 
hi home. Several applications for In- 

laea in salary bj faeult] members 

niiide without result. As there 

is no prospect of an early ooneidera- 

of their demands, t he entire facultj 

ided iii their resignations and left. 

I he initial number of students in the 

i-> entering die University of Ver- 

il this year was the lar ge st in the 
' -lory of the university. 

M. I. T. commenced its 78th year with 

enrollment of :i:>2* students, 2-2."> of 

rbono come frosi foreign countrlei 

* o-eds at Connecticut Ayyie are hy 

■i" means excluded from initiation SC- 

iea. C. A. C. Campus says; Prosfa 

dl were initialed into college by a 
■ ttii in Swan Lake last Friday at 
night. 



HAVE YOU FOUND 

How handy it is to drop in between classes to indulge your sweet tooth? 
Tae ideal place to spend those occasional spare moments, and a place of 
meeting for a friendly chat. It is an easy and pleasant habit to cultivate. 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

We bars a supply oi freak 

Carnations, Roses, Violets 

Also Potted Plants 
QBOWN ON mi i wins- 

FLORICULTURE DEPARTMENT 

Telephone HIIO 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other gnml things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Mi-tilleSt.-.-et lel.41.VWI P*"**~T. TTlft 



The Holyoke Valve S Hydrant Co. 

J M>er» of Wrought Iron tad I'.russ Pipe. 

M and Fittings for Steanu Witter and 

Asbestos and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe 

•) lugs. Pipe Cot toSketoh. Mill Supplies 

' -Ineers and Contractors for Steam and 

H t Water Heating. Automatic Sprinkler 

ns. Roller and Engine Connections. 

Holyoke, Mass 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing mnd Printing 

Mills Studio Phone 456-R 



Dairy Science. 

When the Agricultural Colleges sa- 
lered the field of hairy Husbaadry thej 
turaed the light <>r seteaes apoa this 
ledastrlal Held with ihe raaull thai 
better sneihods of saaoofaeturs and 
hlgh*grade prod nets are ssade possible. 

AlliollU these heller iiicIIhmIs nolle 
appear to be more important of BtON 

aeeesear] than sanitary eleaaliaess, If 
good results are to be obtained, ami tbe 

use oi 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books Fountain Pens 



h^aMoTTe 



is recommended hy the Agricultural 

Colleges ol tllS (Jetted Stales anil Can- 
ada. heeaiiM ihe fresh, wholesome, san- 
itary cleanliness this cleaner provides is 

not only an adequate protection to the 

dairy from iusanitatioii, hut is also 
prortag most efficienl eodecononomlcal. 

Indian In ctrels 

Order from your supply 
house. 

Il cleans clean. 
in everjr |ikg 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




PLYMOUTH INN 

Northampton 

Quiet and Comfortable — Every 
facility for 

BANQUETS, PARTY DINNERS 

European Plan. 



C. F. DYEK 



PLAZA 

Northampton . Hsss, 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

\S hilt- the I'.ewl 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Ale hIhiwii. 

Program chaimed daily «>cept Monday 
and Tueiday. 

I BJUl K P. IIIIMUN I . MSSSiSI 



Full Line ol 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "I lamp." 



^=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 



SHORT-COURSE FOOTBALLERS 
FACE STIFF SCHEDULE 

The two-year men have Marled <>n 

i t.t-i i football season wiih a record num- 
ber oul and a schedule thai will lax 
i i.ciii k« t lie utmost lo pal across for a 

aerie! of straight wins. Forty men have 

turned oul tor practice, which is the 
maximum Dumber o! nelformi allowed. 

An.v man not appearing for practice or 
handing in his suit has someone on the 
wailing list to take his plaee. There is 

e good nucleus from the team laal sea- 
son. This lisl is composed of ten, all ol 
whom were in the game last year. 

Blebard, Stelle, and rTlggtnof the baek- 
Bold, am! Baelling, Burke, Wood, Bay- 
inon.i, Burnette, Gerard, and Lawreeee 

of the line. 

Coaeb Grayeoa is devoting his entire 

lime to the I. -am. A snappy practice is 

bold every alien i; although elaaaea 

prevent some men from gettlag out at 

that time, everyone nets in at least one 
hour. The men are showing lots of 
pep, and the new men. quite a niimhei 
of whom have never played before, are 
trying bard and are eager lo learn. 
There is l.oth a l»d and ird team this 

year, whieh is a meat advantage ovei 

las'. The following new men are doing 

exceptionally well: Maggie, Bartwell, 

Keat in», (lark, Hancock, Ouirck. Judge, 
Richardson, Mowers and (lakes. All of 
these men have had some previous fool- 
hall experience. 

A last schedule has been arranged, 
the lirst game which was to have been 
played with Rosary Blgh School having 
l.een canceled. The Hith will he an 
open date. The following game* are 
scheduled : 

net. s.\. Springfield V. ftf. C. a. Col- 
leg* tad leam. at Springfield. 

Oct :'.(). Sutlield School, at Sullielil. 

V.v.ti. Cusblag Academy, at Ash- 
huruham. 

Nov. IS. Connecticut Agricultural 3d 
team. Alumni Field. 



BATES DEFEATED 

i ontinued Fram p'>« H ' 



eeivlnR the blekofl and running Ibro- 

nul. the entire Aggie 'earn for Rates' 
only touchdown. Moilllon kicked I he 

woal. King kicU.-l of! again ami on 
the first play Batea gained fifteen yards 

on an end run. Two more runs of fifteen 
yards each brought thb ball within 
■coring distance hut a good tackle bj 

cotton apoiled Batea' ehanea and the 

hall went lo at A. C. Several good 
tackles in succession teal.ued I he next 

tew minute* play then Lent brought 

the aggie supporters to their feel bjf 

golag through teehie lor ten yards. 
Collins gained three yards ami Lent 
euried the hall twenty yurda, In the 
MX I two playa, tor the second score. 

Poole kicked the goal. a twenty-yard 
run by the Hales uuarter-baek and a 

twelve yard gain by Orayeoa on a lor- 

Ward pass were the only other plays ol 
especial interest in litis oitartcr. 

Several good tackles hy Leal and King 

held nates oui of danger during the 

lirst of the fourth quarter. Short gains 

by Sargent and Poole brougbl the 

hall lo Batea' forty-yard line. Alter an 
attempt to buck the line Pooli threw a 

forward lo Qrayaoa whoeaughl the hall 

and ran the remainded of ihe field for a 
touchdown. PoOle kicked the goal. 

Batea received the kick and were held 
on their twenty-yard line. Ofl toe 
fourth down Davis broke through the 
AC gi« defense and ran forty yards be- 
fore he was tackled. They were held 
for downs but recovered the ball on a 
fumble. The game ended wit h I he ball 
in the visitors' possession 
The score : 



At the judging content this week la 

Chicago the team from If. A. C. placed 

•tih anions; the 1\ teams which repre- 
sented all parts of the country. In 

judging the Gaeraaey type Blebard 
W. Smith "21 Of Rutland, Vt., obtained 
the tirst prize. This was the word ob- 
tained by telegram Monday night hy 

the Department Head. The leant con- 
sisting of K. \V. Smith, l'.aker and 8. K. 

Hard 'SI, will arrive back in Amherst 
early this week. 



vt. \. C. 
ataneell, le 
aeheaon, le 

Cotton, 1 1 

Honor, lg 

MacKintosh. « 

Latour, rg 
Brigbam, rg 
King, n 

(iraysoti, re 

Poole qh 

Lent. Ihb 

Sargent, rhb 

Collins, fb 



ii a 1 1 a. 
re, Gormley 

it. Scott 

rg, Newman 

e, I. lice 

ly, Sullivan 

It , Seivert 

le. Canter 
t|l>. Bouttda 

rhb. Moiilton 

lhb. Pinnegaa 

fb, Davia 



Score -M. A. CM, Batea 7. Touch- 
downs l'oole, Lent. Qrayaoa, and Pin- 
Began. Coals from Touchdown-Poole 

:;. Moiilton l. Beferee— Carpenter. Um- 
pire McQrath. Linesman Young. 
Time— Four 15 minute perioda. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



College Candy Kitchen 



THE PLACE TO GET 

Home-made Chocolates and Confections 

MADE DAILY 

PURE AND FRESH CHOCOLATES 
Creams and Biscuit centers 



FRUITS 



NUTS 



Cream Caramels and Taffies 



AT THE FOUNTAIN 



DELICIOUS HOT CHOCOLATE WITH WHIPPED CREAM 



Main Street, 



Amherst, Mass. 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 

Main and Worthington Streets 

Give at a trial 



EAT MORE DAIRY PRODUCTS 

All of our dairy products are made 
from pasteurized milk and cream. 

Salt and Sweet Butter. 
Cottage,Neufchatel,01ive, 
Pimento and Club Cheese 
Ice Cream. 

Send for our price list. 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Building, 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

Non Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association. 

Basketball Association, 

The Collegian, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Association, 



I Hi-phone 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 454 W 

(i. M. Campbell, Secretary 175 J 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 403-M 

F. P. Rand, Manager 

C. D. Kendall, President 

C. F. Clark, Manager 

Lorenzo Fuller, Manager 

V. A. Gilbert, Manager 

J. I). Fvers, Manager 

C. W. Bunker, Manager 

L. P. Martin, F.cfitor 

(;. W. F.dinan, Manager 
M. F. Webster, Kditor 
Frederic Howard, Manager 



Dairy Department 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Amherst Main. 



Studente' Appliances (HENRY ADAMS & CO. 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-one Index, C. I). Kendall, Meager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 
Y M (j. A. Howard Goff President 



136 R 
jSo 
280 

8325 

83*5 

+ 16 M 

2 So 

8377 
280 

214 

8325 
280 

280 
8314 



G, H. RUMERY, Electrician 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUGS AND CARPETS 

— K. D. MARSH K8TATK — 

High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

AT 

Economy Prices 



The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, -__ ****' 

I -The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 
JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 






E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst | 



The student gathering place for 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






OCT 2 1 1920 



grf*f c< ill > » » <-il 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 20, 1920. 



No. 3 



TWO THIRDS OF FRESHMEN world aggie night 
CLASS PLEDGE ON MONDAY 



Season Closes Harmoniously After 
Strenuous Competition. 

After a serious rushing HMM of two 
weeks and live days OB per rent of the 
rlass of 1924 have been pledged l»> fra- 
ternities. The competition this y.-.u 
lias heen unusually keen on account of 
the exceptional quality <>f the incoming 
class as a whole. After chapel Monday 
morning the Freshmen appeared with 
their pledge buttons on, and a general 
sigh of relief was noticeable among 
the upperclassmen. The Freshmen, 
appear satisfied with their selections, 
:ind the fraternity life promises to be 
one of progress and of harmony thro- 
ughout the year. The Freshmen 
pledged as follows: 

Q. T. V. 

Armstrong, Bradford Kensington, M<l. 

Worcester 

lladley 

Amherst 

Cambridge 

Cambridge 

Sunderland 

Beverly 

Leominster 



SET FOR OCTOBER 29 1 

Alumni to Gather in Forty Localities. 

Cuba, Hawaii, and Porto Rico 

to Have Meetings. 



WORCESTER DEFEATED 

BY STRONG OFFENSIVE 

Two Touchdowns in the Last Quarter 
Give Aggie a 21-6 Win. 



Bowes, Charles A. 
Bilski, Francis I*. 
Deuel, Charles F. 
Darling, Robert M. 
Kennedy, K. Francis 
Williams, James L. 
Macau ley, Donald 
Dresser, Allen L. 

Pin Ski ma Kaim'A. 
Woodworth, Robert H. Newton 

Ball, Kenneth I.. Bloomlicld, N. .1. 

I'obey.C. S. Belmont 

t.arretson, A. Conwin, Bound Brook. N.. I. 
Da Bois, Martin L. New Plat/., N. V. 
i hase. Theodore M. Milton 

Whitman, Chester Suftield, Conn. 

Kappa Shim a. 
'...Idsmith, Elliot O. B.ookline 

Haskell, Malcom R. Lebanon, N. H. 

Sime, Arnold J. Adams 

Waugh, Albert K. Amherst 

Belden, Clifford L. Bradstreet 

Kappa Camma I'm. 
Leat he, William W. Larch mont, N. Y . 



Kenton, George J. Amherst 

i mornings, Leslies. Webster 

Nutting, Raymond K. Kitrhburg 

Lane, Wilfred C. Fitchburg 

lloltein.J. G. Quincy 

< ullins, Oscar K. Fitchburg 

i'.arleaux, Frank K. Framingham 

Tiikta Cm. 
1 romack, Earl A. 
Morse, Alfred B. 
Lamb, Erie F. 
Noyes, Russell 
Rhodes, Winthrop G, 
Weatherwax, H. K, 
Wood, W. W. 
Bowes, Glover G. 
Frost, Willard C. 

Sioma Pin Kpsii.on. 

Frost, Sherman Cambridge 

I'.artlett, Frederics. 

Bike, Edward L. 

Kmery, George E. 

Rlanchard, N. H. 

'•ifford, Richard S. 

[Continued on p*<e Si 



Shelburne 

Oakland 

Waban 

Newtonville 

Waban 

Greenfield 

Barre Plains 

Swampscot 

Milfoid 



Westfield 
West field 
Marlboro 
Pittsfield 
S. West port 



The opening event of the alumni 
group to celebrate the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of M .A. «'., is It) take place Oct. 
'».>. Word Aggie Night. At that time 
there are to be forty different die Melt 
throughout the country, whclevel t here 
arc any Aggie alumni. These dinners 
are in charge ol chairmen, located in 
the various localities, and any necessary 
arrangements should be made with 
them directly, as soon as possible. 

The purpose of World Aggie Night, 
primarily, is to bring together all Aggie 
men, wherever located, thai they ma> 
most fittingly commemorate the found- 
ing ol 'their Alma Mater. An .veiling 
of good fellowship and enjoyment, with 
plenty of old-time Aggie pep. is in 
■ton for every alumnus, if cadi one 
will do his share lowai Is making the 
celcbiaiion a grand success. For any 
whose locality is not included in the 
lisl below, the Alumni Association will 
be glad to back I hem in making indi- 
vidual pleat •"! meetings. It basal- 
ways been the policy of the Association 
to hold meetings in all localities wheic 
there are at least six alumni, and (his 
policy is being followed for World 
Aggie Night. Hereafter it is planned 
to hold alumni dinners annually in 
these localities. 

Prof. J. W. Gregg, '04, ot Berkely, 
CaL. was the first to report that plans 
were under way. Since then, other 
chairman have gotten busy, and the 
movement is well under way now gen- 
erally. Attention is called to the new 
Pacific Coast section el Seattle, Wash: 
also to the meetings in Cuba, Porto 
Rico and Hawaii. In order to assure 
large gatherings at Boston, Springfield, 
and New York, the three centers of the 
largest groups of alumni, it has been 
decided beet to hold bo dinners within 

a •£■> -mile radius of these cities. 

The speakers for the various localities, 
so far as if known now, are the. follow- 
ing:— 
.Chicago, EL J. Watts 

Cleveland, Bomner R. .Parker 

Washington, Prof. F. A. Waugh 
Baltimore, John D. Willard 
Philadelphia, Prof. C. A. Peters 
BMtOB, President K. L. Butterfield 

Governor GooUdge 

New Haven, S. B. Haskell 

Arthur F. Brides 
Pittsfield. It. D. Hawley 
Hartford, C. R. Greene 
Worcester. A. I'. McDoiigall 
Springfield, Dean F. M. Lewis 
Amherst, Prof. P. B Hasbrouck 
New York, Prof. C. ». Hicks 
Providence, Prof. W. I" B. Lockwood 
PLtsburg, C. H. Gould 

Governor Coolidge and President 
Butterfield should prove to be a great 
[ Continued on p»S« t"l 



Showing a strong offensive power in 

tbe fourth quarter thai netted them 

two touchdowns, tbe varsity football 

team woe it's third seoeseive game bj 

defeating Worcester Tech., 2Mb The 
game was played at Won tstci before 
one of the largest crowds that have wit- 
nessed a college game in that city. The 
home team was supported by the entire 
student body while nearly a hundred 
men from Aggie wen' down by auto to 
see i be game. 




( v it. IIauoi.i. W. Pools 



The first few minutes of play were 
devoted to a kicking game. Collins out- 
kicked bte Opponent and finally the M. 
A. C. team found itself inside of Wor- 
cester's territory. Two or three line 
rushes by Worcester netted that team a 
gain of 14 yards. The next play was a 
forward pass which never worked for 
Worcester, for MacKintosh, Ihe Aggie 
center, intercepted Ihe pass ootbelfi* 
vatd line and ran 2."» yards before he 
was brought down on Worcester's 10- 
yard line. Three line plays and a live 
(Continued on page s 1 



OUR OPPONENTS SCORES 

LAST SATURDAY 



VLIiMoNT 

NFW HAMPSHIRE 

TIFI's 

Norwich I'niversity 

Army 
SPHINGF1KLD 

Maine 

RHODE ISLAND 



7 


7 


M 
7 

7 

7 



CIVIC ASSOCIATION 

CONVENES ON CAMPUS 

Students Attend Meetings. National 

Parks, Billboard Nuisance and 

Town Planning Discussed. 

The Kith annual convention of the 

American Civic Association was held 
here on the campus last Thursday, Fri- 
day, and Saturday. To Ihe members of 
the Association who were the special 
guests of the college, an opportunity 
was given to become acquainted with 
the aspects ol country planning, in Am- 
herst and the neighboring country; 
while to the students an opportunity 
was given tor attending the meetings 
of Ihe Association. At ten o'clock 
Thursday morning all classes lot fOOl 
year students wile suspended until 
noon and at the same lime on the fol- 
lowing day classes for the two year stu- 
dents wele suspended in Ihe same WIIV 

President Hultci field gave an eddn 
efWelc at the opening of the pro- 
gram Thuisdav morning in which he 
made note ol the la. t that the college 
was heartily in sympathy with the ell 
oris of the Assoi •iatieii, at tbe san.e tin., 
extending a welcome in behalf of the 
stale, as Governor Coolidge was not 
able to be present. 

Following this, an address telling o| 
the founding and growth of the Associ- 
ation was given by Mr. .1 II. MacFai 
land, president of the Association. He 
spoke of the fact that since the found- 
ing of Ihe Associat sixteen yeais 

ago. its object bad always been to make 
America a belter piece i" which to I i v • - . 
and it had been a powerful inlluence in 
all the great movement, lor civic bet- 
terment, and had taken the lead in the 
.leaning up of various towns, in Un- 
making of Niagara Falls a national pofl 
session, the back to the country move- 
ment, and the conservation ol national 
forests. 

Th« next speaker, Col. w. B. Sreeiy . 

chief of the II. S. Forest Service, gave 
an interesting account of I he extent ol 
the national forests and their value in 
Ihe protection ol water sheds, conserva- 
tion of wild life, ami also their aesthetn 
value in affording places of recreation 
for the American public. He urged t lie 
utilization of these forests with a mini 
mum of waste, with a definite plan for 
obtaining the combination of these val- 
ues, and legislation to bring about this 
result. 

An address was then given by Hon. 
Stephen T. Mather, director of the nat- 
ional park service. Including a fine des - 
cription of a tour recently made through 
the canyon country in the south of 
Utah, a little known and unappreciated 
region, now a National Park. He also 
told of a National Park tour which In- 
had instituted which takes in most ot 
the important parks of the West, ami 
that his dream for the near future was 
that a party traveling through the 
West in their car would be able to 



5 
> 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 20, 1920. 



spend each Bight OB land (hat ffll :i 
part of a national park. Mr. bfeFar- 
land then read a I hum from the Secre- 
tary of the Interior which declared the 
hearty cooperation of that oflice in re- 
yard to the attitude taken hy the asso- 
ciation on the ((ueslion of the damming 
of the Yellowstone River within the 
limits of the park. 

At 10-(K) o'clock on Friday morning 
all classes for the two-year men were 
suspended and all attended the associa- 
tion meetings. At this mealing an in- 
troductory speech was giran l>y Dean 
Lewis. Following this, Mr. E. T. Hart- 
man spoke on the eradication of the 
billboard nnisanee in the open country. 
He brought out the fact that it could 
be eradicated if public sentiment could 
be aroused to the point where that sort 
of advertising would not be a paying 
proposition to the advertisers. Aniol- 
diess was then niven by Mr. \V. B 
Greely on the Civic Centers for Massa 
chuBelts Towns of Less Than 10,000 
Population. He gave a brief history of 
the development of the community 
center in New England since Colonial 
days. In regard to the placing of pub- 
lic bulldlBgl he showed that to have 
the best etfect bulldluga should not 
only possess beauty themselves but 
should be in a suitable neighborhood. 

Friday afternoon there was an ex- 
cursion by automobile to Northampton. 
Old Deertield, Iladley, Sunderland, and 
Greenfield, where an opportunity was 
given to Bee the (Jreenlield Housing de- 
velopment. On Friday evening at 8-00 
o'clock the subject "Planning for the 
Small Village and Rural District"' was 
discussed. There were three addresses 
given, dealing with the organization of 
country life, which was followed SJ I 
general discussion. The speakers were 
Dr. Albert Sharp, editor of the Benfewe/ 
Review*, George B. Ford, and Tlioma- 
AdaniR, town planner for Canada. 

On Saturday morning 1'rofessor John 
Phelau. L II. Smith, Masterof the State 
Grange, Hugh MacCrea, and Dr. ('. .1. 
Galpin of the U. H. Department of Ag- 
riculture spoke on "Country Planning 
and the Farm."' In the afternoon the 
discussion was continued and addressei 
given by Professor Arthur W. Cowell, 
State College, IVnn.; Mrs. N. < . Martin. 
Professor It. B. Cruickshank, and Jnlm 
N. Cole, Commissioner of Publifl Works. 
The program for the Association 
meeting closed at Amherst Saturday af- 
ternoon, although it was continued in 
conjunction with the program of the 
National Country Life Association in 
Springfield in the evening. 



those of a social nature, affecting 
women students. The President and 
Faculty reserve the- rij.'ht to revoke this 
power or any part of it at any time. 

There is an Executive Council consist- 
ing of three Seniors, two Juniors, and 
One Sophomore. The otlicers of the 
Council area President, a Vice-Presi- 
dent, and a Secretary; preferably two 
of these are Seniors and one a Junior. 
a regular meeting of the council to bald 
the lirst week of October and last week 
of May. 

The council elected this year consist* 
of the following: President, Jane L. 
Pollard of North Adams; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Fmily B. Van Lennep, of Great 
Harrington; Secretary ln/.a A. Boles 
<>l Dorchester: Viola Cameron of Pel- 
ham : Mai ion B. Bussel of Boston and 
Ruth W. Murder of Mallapan. 




FRESHMAN ELEVEN OPENS 

SEASON WITH VICTORY 



Dalton High Defeated 6-0 in 
Teat for 1924 Team. 



First 



If you were to vote for the most satisfactory clothing store in Northampton 
what points would you consider? How about a large stock with wide range 
in color, pattern, models and sizes? How about such well known makes as 

Hart Schattner and Marx, and Society Brand Clothes? 

When in Hamp give us a call. We will give you uniform courtesy and 

money back if not satisfied. 

MEBRITT CLARK & CO. 



144 Main Street, 



Northampton 



WOMEN'S STUDENT 

COUNCIL ORGANIZES 



Officers For 



The Year 
Elected. 



Recently 



One of the most important student or- 
ganizations 011 the campus is the Wom- 
an's Student (iovernment Association. 
This council stands on a par with the 
Senate, being the governing board of 
the women students. 

Seeking to cultivate a feeing of re- 
sponsibility among women students 
and to increase the spirit of loyalty to 
the college the women students of M. 
A. C. organized this association for self- 
government more than two years ago. 
It is the object of this associat ion to con- 
trol all appropriate matters pertaining 
to the conduct of the women students. 
All women students are subject to the 
operation of this council and are ipso 
facto members. The council is subject 
to the Faculty but it legislates on all 
non-academic questions, other than 



The Aggie Freshman foot hall team 
started its season auspiciously with a 
victory over Dalton High School last 
Saturday afternoon. The score was 
only »i to 0, however, the Dalton team, 
which is being coached by Frellick •JO, 
proved a worthy opponent Otttholdlog 
the lirst year men to a single touch- 
down. 

Salmon kicked oil' to Dalton to stall 
the game and then the Freshmen forced 
them to punt. Another exchange <>1 
kicks followed and then a long punt l.y 
Barker put the ball on Million's live- 
yard line. Here 1M4 received it after 
an attempted forward pass and Bilski 
carried the ball over for the only score 
of the name, just before the quarter 
ended. 

In the second quarter Dalton opened 
an aerial attack which was one of the 
featum of the game. Five forward 
passes were completed in as many 
plays, and the ball carried well into the 
Freshman territory before it was lost 
on downs. 

The Freshmen threatened to score 
again in the third quarter when two 
forward paaees, FsrrnnU to Porgee, and 

some substantial gatna throng the line 
by Williams brought the ball to Dal- 
ton's one-yard line. Here Dalton stiff- 
ened, recovered the ball on downs, and 
punted to safety. The ball remained 
near the middle of the field for the re- 
mainder of the game. 

The Freshmen had the advantage in 
weight but they were out punted and 
this, with Dalton's forward passing 
game, held the score down. Williams 
was the most consistent ground gainer 
for the Freshmen, and Forges .also 
played a good game. Connors and 
Hoxie did the best work for Dalton. 

The lineup: 




MABK 



--^ 



AW D C Pipe is the biggest value that the World's 
Largest Pipe Manufacturers can put into a pipe. The 
W D C is a good, satisfying smoke, and bound to break in 
sweet and mellow every time. Highest quality of bit, band 
and bowl; craftsmanship of the highest order — that's what 
we mean by biggest value. Ask any good dealer. 

WM. DEMUTH 61 CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLD'S LARG E ST M A K E R S OF FINE PIPES 



N & CUTLER 

DK&LBBg IN 

DRY AND FANCV GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



BECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

NORTHAMPTON 



m. a. c. ino 

Porgee, le 

Salmon, It 
Staebner, Ig 
Wilhelm. c 
My rick. Ig 
Marker, rt 
Chase, re 
Tew hi 11, <|b 
bilski, lhb 
Ferranti, rhb 
Williams, fb 

Benin- M. 

Touchdown - 



Dai.ton 

re, Culverwell 

rt. Wood lock 

rg, Adams 

c, Stephens 

lg, E. Hoxie 

lg, I.amont 

le, Bowker 

i|b, Connors 

rhb, Gilbert 

lhb. A. Hoxie 

I'b. .1 . Connors 

A. C. 1»24 6, Dalton 0. 
- Bilski. Referee — Ken- 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



nedy. Cmpire— Williams. Head lines- 
man — Lewandowski. Time — 12 min. 
periods. 



-FOR- 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 20, 1920. 



AGGIE'S COUNTRY FAIR 

PROVES TO BE BIG SUCCESS 

Live Interest Shown in First Agri- 
cultural Show. 

Probably the liin^est "show" ever 
held on the Aggie campus took place 
i the week-cnil. commencing Fri- 
day, Oct. l. r >, and ending Sunday, Oct. 
\ fair was held under the auspices 



I the Department of lloiticiilt me ol 

If, A. C, and included pontologlcal, 

iloricultural, and vegetable gardening 
displays, lieside possessing a fortune- 
teller, a side-show, and confect lonei v 

hoot be. 

The largest tent by tar was the ma- 
chinery tent, in which were displayed 

orchard spray era, fertiliser distributors, 
i towers, and all other Implement! 

.1 in horticulture. Directly opposite 
this tent was the pomology tent. On 
the left side were exhibited the faculty 

.iilleclions of products. Dr. William P, 

Brooks, and Oharlee F. Qreen, librarian. 

were the bin winners in this class, the 
former obtaining lirst prize in live \a- 

: et lea of grapes, ten varieties of apples, 

and four varieties of pears; while the 
liter won lirst prize on two varieties 0< 
apples and three varieties o I peats. On 
right were the student displays. 
I he biu winners here were Watson. 
Huntley, and Peck. The bay Road 
I i iii t Farm of Amherst also exhibited 
-.one excellent varieties of apples in 
boxes ready for shipment. The student 

packing courses also had exhibits ol 
apples read] lor the market. The next 

ten) contained displays of ornamental 
-. vines, and ihrubs, which are used 

tor lasdeeaps pur p ose s . The large red 
units of the magnolia, tbe branches of 
Englieh Hawthorne and Javanese Lures 
were especially beautiful. All these 
ornamentations were collected na the 
Iggle campus. There was also a teal 

devoted to table decorations, which 

were designed by students InCommer- 

■ il Floriculture, and to vase displays, 

designed by tbe students la Qreen- 
houae Management Watkins. O'Hnrs, 

West, and (,'ascio were the table exhih- 
ors. The tent of Horticultural Mann 

factum* was the second largest in the 

fair, and contained various preserved 

and evaporated products. Various types 

ol evaporators epple-corers-snd-peeler« 
were also demonstrated. Especially of 

Brest was the collection of preserved 
products sent to the fair by Mrs. Edith 
llawleyof AgSWStn, whoss exhibits at 
Springfield, recently, were prize-win- 

rs; also the Vegetable Qsrdentng Do- 
lmen! devoted a tent to the exhibits 

■Indents and commercial growers. 
One collection of a commercial grower 
contained aaore than SO kinds of rege- 

es. In the center of the tent were 
pyramids constructed of vegetables, 

srrangsd in the English style, by 

indents. The Hutchinson carioi. 

Which has recently been put on the 

!..■', was also displayed. Il is line 

box marketing. There was also an 

libit of ragetabb I packed in the new 

tdaid bushel boxes used in the BoS- 

Snd Providence markets. It is a 

Inches lower than the former type. 
I pes of Chinese csbbnge, which make 

lilent salad ami ooldslsw, was also 

i own. The other pyramid waa in mass 
and was composed of vegetables 

wit on the campus. A tine exhibit 
i elery raised from home seed was 
■had by J. M. and A. H. Smith. 
- has been declared by authorities 

* the finest celery la Raw England. 

.< left side was a variety display 
US, radishes, corn and sqUUSb. 
he side show performance by Ander- 



son, Sampson, Ibeavilt, and Smith was 
Silent, as proved by the "fall house " 

at each performance, and the Qypey 

fortune-teller was kept constantly busy. 
The election lioolh was i|Uite busy. 
Here any one for the small sum of liw 
cents could casija vote for the president- 
ial candidates. Harding, Cox and Debs. 
The fair was held in the open space 
to the left of French Hall, and was laid 
out in real circus form, containing a 
wide street with tents on either side, to 
form the usual "cattle show midway." 
The list of faculty prizes are as lol- 
lows : 

First prize, (irapes — Worden. Niagara, 
Delaware, Concord, Herbert. Dr. W. I'. 

Brooks. 

First prize, bears — Anjon, BOSO, Shel- 
don, Worden, Scckel. Dr. W. 1*. 
Ilrooks. 

Iir>t prize. Fears— Hartlett . Orange, 

Seek le. ( . b. Qreen, librarian. 

First prize. Apples — McA flee, Wolt 

River, Mother. Boxbury Basset, K. 
1 Greening, Kiny, Gravenststn, 
Baldwin, Eallawater, Helatoah, 
Wagoner, Sat ton. Dr. \V. P, brooks. 

First prize. Apples- Fall l'ippin, Win- 
ter banana. C. B. Green, Librarian. 

Second prize. A pples - Sw aal . PrOfeS 
BOI W. b. Hart. 

The list ot student prizes are as fol- 
low- : 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men taught to ic.nl i>.\ QOtokMt matboda. 
Inoulflmm ml Mltlm Studio, 

P. O. ltiuliliiik'. I'liniie SM i; 



SI I illIK LINK OK 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hose for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A good 
assort ment of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



THE 



Northampton, Mass. 



■■si n ■■■■ *ana jfo Leader f or College Banquets 

btkimikn Lank Fouikk. <inc> 

MANI'r'tcniKINd JBH'KI.KFH 

1HO IIWJAUWAY, raW YOHK 

CUVUS a no cor,r,K<irc 

PZZVSa AND KfNtJH > 

OOI.l>. NII.THR A-NO HHON-/.B MBIIAI.M 



Al'l'l Rl 

Mi Intosh. First prize— W. R. Trillion 

Sec I prise b. ('. I'eck. Third 

prize— F. C. bobinson. 

I!. I. Delicious. First prize A. W.Wat 
son. Second prize — K. K. Huntley. 

Stttton. Flrat prfcm — K. C. I'eck. Sec- 
ond prize b. l£ Iliinllev. 

It. I. ben Dnvls. First prize — A. W. 
Watson. Sec 1 prize b. K. Iliinl- 
lev. Third prise a. w. Priest. 

B. 1. Baldwin. First prize A. W. 

Watson. 
U. I. Wealthy. First prize- A. W. 

Watson, second prise F. <'. Rob- 
inson. 
Woli biver. First prim — b. lb BstSJ, 

Third prize — A. W. Watson. 

Spy. First prize - \{. C. I'eck. Sccniid 
prize b. B. Ksley. Third prize 
A. W. Watson. 

King. First prize |{. B. Kstey. Sec 
mill prise \ W. Watson. Third 
prize- F. ('. Bobinsin. 

Qrsvenstein. First prise— F. 0. Bobin- 
son. 

Rome Beauty, Second prise— b. C. 

I'eck. 
Qano. Second prize- H. C. I'eck. 
Snow. Second |nize A. W. Priest. 
Illlbbetlielsoli. Secoinl prize — F. C. boli- 

inson. 
Bine l'earinain. Second prize— F. C. 

Bobinson. 

Victoria Sweet. Second prize — K. K. 

Iliinllev. 

Ontario. Second prize — b. K. Huntley. 

Maiden Blttsb. Seioiid prize b. F. 

Bnntlej . 

Winter banana 

Bobinson. 

Northern spy. 

Huntley. 

It. I. Stark— Second prise A .W.Watson. 
Boxbnry Basset. Second prize— R. K. 

1 1 11 nt lev . 

K. I. Northwestern. Second prize— A. 
W. Watson. 

BysiopClsb. Fust prize- b. b. Hunt- 
ley. 

Bterkjr. Second prise- A. W. Priest, 

First prise. For five best commercial 
varieties ot apple (Grsvensts£n,R, I. 
Qreealng, Baldwin, Wealthy, He- 

Intovli 
Fot deeoratlng table. First prize— T. 
I). Watkins. Second prize— J. E. 
O'liara. Third prize- '■ C. I 



Second prize — F. C. 



d prize- I!, i: 



SIIMG LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE MII1KTT JEWELRY STORE 



College Jewelry CvB Links, Hurt < niltr I'lni. 
Ureas Hull Sets. \ 'lolln. Ilanjii. Maiiitulln Htrlnu* 

Fine Watch Repairing, aln» Broken Lentea 
Replaced Promotly. 



32 Main Street. 



Amhertt, Nan. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



All stood fertiliwra m;ikt* crops grow. 

HIGGLS' MAKES THEM GROW BEST 

(We don't advertise, we're just telling you). 



HK.GINS 'OT 



HIISSII I '16 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



I^ttJsCe' 



hoe 

SPECIAL 



tore 



$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 

MORANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 

Manufacturers [ ns titutioii Cooking Apparatus 

86 WASHINGTON »T. - 



BOSTON 



C&rp*rvter St Morehouse, 

PRINTET 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 13, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 20, 1920. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of tbe Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Lai IB8VOS I\ MuiriN '21. Killtnr-in-t hief 

|OBBtl I.. JoiH 1! Managing Editor 

Asbociatk Kimtokh. 
Qaoacs w. Shui "■ 

lUIHI A. HAUNAKD "■ 

Stanley W. Kkomi.kv II 

I'ai i. I.. Hi usrrr '22 

HollAUT W. Sl'lilNli '22 

Kki.ihmi K. .Ia'KHiin '22 
,I(.iin m. wniniKH '2a 
L. II. Akimsoton '23 



suffer and activities will be in a better 
all-round condition. 

Tbe main objection to the plan is that 
it Might result in a semester-lout; m*li- 
ing season. This matter has been cared 
for in other colleges by obliging each 
fraternity to give a bond of a specified 
amount which is forfeitable it the par- 
ticular fraternity l« found ffllllty oi rush- 
ing during the first semester. The deli- 
nilion of the word "rushing" and the 
possible trials should be p laced in the 
hands of the interfralernity conference. 
This system works elsewhere under 
conditions similar to those to be found 
at M A. C. In it lies a possible and 
very probable remedy for the ills of the 
present .ushing season. 



Business Department. 

Hk.khkkt L. Okkic '21. Hu«tne»» Manager 

KNKiirii r. rOBBtOS '21 Advertising Manager 

«'n Mil M A. Hi < k '22 Circulation Manager 

MVHHN Q, Mihhav '22 

1 1 < • I . I > K N WlllTTAKKK '28 

OWKN K. Kol.SOM '28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, U) cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case "of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Bntfredasaecnnd-rlRM matter at the A inherit 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of ixmtage provided for in section 1108. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



The Rushing Season 
Willi a sigh of relief which finds a 
ready echo from tbe faculty, the stud- 
ent body has laid down its implements 
of interfraternity warfare and is rapidly 
returning to its normal state of healthy 
activity. There exists a divided opin- 
ion as to the real value of the season as 
it now exists. The extreme competi- 
tion among the fraternities for the new 
men has led to the development of a 
series of unavoidable evils, and there 
fore, a desire on the part of a great 
many for some detinite change. During 
tbe past two weeks studies have softer 
ed, activities have been neglected, and 
morale, from the standpoint of the 
college as a whole, has been extremely 
low. 

At various times in the past various 
changes have been IBggested; a short 
three day season at the opening of col- 
lege, a ten-day period at the same time, 
a season at the beginning of the second 
>eiiiester. Off at the beginning of the 
sophomore year. All of these have their 
good and bad points. 

In the case of the three or ten-day 
M.n, pre-rushing will have lobe re- 
sorted to with accompanying summer 
rushing and heavy expenditures. The 
result will be that tbe freshman, in 
many cases, will not become acquainted 
with many of the fraternity brothers-to- 
be until he has already committed him- 
self. Yet. on the other band, the amount 
of time oc. upied by tbe short season 
will not be suflicient to greatly interfere 
with studies, activities, or morale. 

The suggestion that tbe rushing sea- 
son be postponed until the beginning of 
the second semester or even the sopho- 
more year, has advantages easily seen. 
The freshmen have a chance to observe 
each and every fraternity in its normal 
life He has a chance to become really 
acquainted with the upper classmen. 
His time ordinarily devoted to studies 
during one of the most important peri- 
ods of bis college career is not monopo- 
lized by hectic social activities. On the 
other hand, the fraternity has similar 
opportunities of observing the freshman 
as he really is. College morale will not 



"The Country Fair" 
Visitors at the recent ' country fair " 
were agreeably surprised at the. variety 
of displays and amusements which they 
found there. Rather Ihurriedly » plan- 
ned, quickly assembled, and excellent- 
ly maintained, the event was a real 
success. Due credit should be given 
the students and faculty who are re- 
sponsible for the accomplishment. 

They worked with the hope of creat- 
ing an agreeable innovation, at least, 
on this campus. Their efforts are 
praiseworthy and the successful results 
easy to be seen. 

Do not let this event pass into M.A.C. 
history as the only one of Us kind. 
Lets have a bigger, belter affair uext 
year. 



year, and those elected shall serve for 
the remainder of their normal college 
course" has been added "beginning 
with the following school year''. 

1$ of thi> section has beeu stricken 
out. 

To Article 1 of the By-Laws, last 
Spring was added Section .1. "The 
judicial proceedings of the Honor 
Council shall be held contidential and 
the books shall be open for inspection 
only to the President of the College and 
to the members of the Honor Council 
and their representatives". 

It might be well to think over the 
two changes iu the Constitution before 
the next Student Forum, inorderto 
facilitate voting. 

(Signed) l'KTKH J. CAsrio, 
President of Honor Council. 



COME ON FELLOWS 

— TO TIIK— 

Datioes ! 

Odd Fellows' Hall. Every Saturday Night. 
JERRY'S JAZZ. BAND 



COMMUNICATION 

At a recent meeting of the Honor 
Council, it was decided to Bring before 
tbe Student Hody for action, the follow- 
ing changes in the Constitution : 

Section I of Article Sat present reads. 
"The Officers of the Honor Council 
shall consist of a President and a Sec 
retary. and shall be chosen by the 
Council". To this, the Honor Council 
thinks it wise to add, "at the last regu- 
lar meeting prior to the close of the 
school year, to take effect at the begin- 
ing of the following school year". 

This addition is thought necessary be- 
cause there must be someone to start 
the work of tbe Honor Council at the 
beginning of each school year in order 
that the Fieshmen may receive Consti- 
tutions and have the Honor System ex- 
plained to them within two weeks after 
the opening of Collage, 

Section "> of Article ;\ reads, "A 
quorum shall consist of six members of 
the council. A vote of one less than 
a quorum is necessary for conviction." 

The prospective change would make 
it read, "A quorum shall consist of one 
less than the total membership of the 
Council. A vote of one less than a 
quorum is necessary for conviction." 

For the first four months of every 
school year the Honor Council consists 
of only six members. The freshman 
member is not elected until after the 
Christmas vacation. As this section 
stands now, every member of the 
council must be present for the trans- 
action of business at any meeting dur- 
ing these first four nionthsof every year. 
Almost invariably one member is 
absent and the council can do no official 
business. The proposed change would 
remedy this difficulty. 

The By-Laws do not have to come be- 
fore the Student Body for changes or 
additions. The following has been done 
to the By-Laws: To Section 1 of Article 
1 which reads. "Each class, except the 
Senior Class, shall elect one new mem- 
ber to the Honor Council at least one 
month prior to the close of the college 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Friday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eve. 2 shows 

6-45. 8-30 



Monday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



The*. If. laes presents Lleyd 
Hushes omI BarbaraCastle- 
l»n in "Dangerous Hours." 

picture of today thatsearchex 
the heart of every American. 
See the strike riot! See the 
atrocities of the Russian 
Ked Heard! 

Newt Topics 

Comedy Hutt and Jeff 

Bryant Washburn andWan- 
da Hawley in "The Six Best 
Cellars." s eorklac tale of 

popping corks. A picture for 
"wets." drjs" and others. 
Rj llolwoithv Hall. 
Scenic reel 
j reel Sunshine Comedy. 

"Mary's Little Lobster " 



All-Star Cast in "Shore 

Acres." from .lame* Heme's 

Brand old play of the New 

Kim land coast. 

" Hidden Da niters," serial 

News Comedy 

William Farnum in "The 
Last of the Duanes." Here 
is Wni. Karnuni at his best. 
See the"FlBht1nit Karnuni" In 
the greatest of Zane ilrey's 
no\els. Action from first to 
last. 

j reel Christie Comedy 

Pathe Review 



gW 




POMONA AND STATE 

GRANGES MEET ON CAMPUS 

The Pomona (Grange worked the fifth 
degree on a number of people Monday 
evening in French Hall. The initiation 
was under the supervision of I'rof. 
Frank A. Waugh, deputy of the Pomo- 
na (irange of Hainpsbiie Cot.nty. The 
following evening another large delega- 
tion was initiated at Stockbridge Hall, 
into tbe sixth degree, by the State 
(irange. 

Many people have decided to take tbe 
fifth and sixth degrees at this lime in 
order (hat they may attend the coming 
National (itange Convention which is to 
be held at Boston. It is expected that 
i Ins convention will work the seventh 
degree on 10,000 people, the largest 
group ever initiated. 



UNITY CHURCH 

HENRY G. IVES, Minister 

Invites you to its home life. 

Come and get acquainted. 

No creedal tests. 



SUNDAY PREACHING SERVICE, 
1045 A. M. 

SONG AND PICTURE SERVICE, 
7-30 P. M. 



We're fairly bursting with 
style ! 

But we don't say much about 
it because our clothes speak for 
themselves ! 

The highest type of tailoring. 
The world's best woolens. 

The best of everything College men wear 
Also Sporting Goods sad Lussase 

Rogers Pket Company 



1'. mad way 
at 13th St. 

Broadway 
at Warren 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 

NKW YORK CITY 



Broadway 
at 34th St. 

Fifth Ave. 

at 41st St. 



There's Just One 100% Efficient 

Cream Separator 



ASI> THAT'S TIIK 



61 LAVAL 

For Forty Years the World's Standard 



There may be a balf-dnzen plows, wagons, 
tractors, antos or other farm equipment to 
choose between, but no would-be Imitator 
or utilizer of expired be I .aval patents has 
yet produced a cream separator comparable 
with the lie Laval. 

First in the beginning, lie l.aval machines 
have led in every step of cream separatoi 
improvement and development. Kvery yeai 
has presented some new feature or better 
ment. and the 1920 machines are still bettet 
than they have ever been before. 

If you haven't seen or tried a new 192c 
De Laval machine, any local agent will be 
glad to afford you the opportunity to do so. 

If you don't know the nearest I)e Laval 
local agent simply address the nearesfcmain 
office, as below. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 

166 Broadway 29 K. Madison St. 61 Beale St. 
New York Chicago San Francisco 

50 000 Branches and Local Agencies 
the World Over 








k T c 




^[N lh«»s«» days when prices iiuiko it good policy to buy the best, 
^ KNOX HATS arc also on the right side of the service question. 
You will want to see these new huts, now, while sizes unci colors art' 
tit the widest range. As usual, ever und ulwuys, CONSULT WAKSII. 




COLLEGIAN COMPITITION 

BEGINS WITH THIS ISSUE 

The annual Coi.i,k«.i.vn competition 
commences with this issue. .lust at pres- 
ent it is not very keen. It is hoped and 
expected that before the time for 
entering the contest elapses, many 
more men from the Sophomore and 
Freshmen classes will sig'iify their in- 
tention of entering the classic. 

Tbe time limit for entering has been 
set at midnight, Friday. Oct. fl. As 
this is the only competition of the 
year it is absolutely necessary for any 
man who intends t<> eOBM out, to do so 
before the time limit expires. 

The positions open are: editorial 
>taff; three Freshmen, one Sophomore: 
business statT, three Freshmen. 

All competitors for the editorial staff 
are requested to report at the office 
Monday night at s (Ml i\ sf. 



AGGIE PIGSKIN CHASERS 

VS. U. OF VT. SATURDAY 

Green Mountaineers Promise a Warm 
Engagement. 
With three consecutive victories be- 
hind it the Aggie football team will 
journey to Burlington next Saturday 
to meet the strong I'niversity of Ver- 
mont team in what will probably lie one 
of the hardest games of the season. 
Vermont has one of the strongest teams 
she has had in many years and has only 
one defeat against her record this sea- 
son, that at the hands of Syracuse Uni- 
versity. She defeated Tufts by a 7 to 
score on Oct. 9 and repeated last Satur- 
day, handing Xew Hampshire her first 
defeat by the margin of one ton 1 - 
down. 
Tbe Vermont team is a fast aggrega- 
>n and also one of the heaviest ever 
uirned out at that institution, with a 
hackfield averaging 1Kb pounds. Kelle- 
roM at left half and Johnson at , fall- 
Si k are two veterans who have been 
arring all season while Skelton has 
proved avaluable man at quarter. The 
cam is coached by Burke a former 
Vermont man. 

Coach Gore's team has scored many 

more points than the Vermont group. 

id while Aggie has not played, perhaps. 

-IBM of as high caliher still her pros- 

Bti for a fourth victory look hright. 

hf will be back at right tackle ami 

I strengthen the M. A. C. line. 

tab Gore has not made his final de- 

-ion on tbe position of center and 

-lit guard but aside from these two 

ues the teams will lineup as follows: 



>:itMONT. 

mger,re 
irrity, rt 
i/.mick, rg 
Mann, c 
ircell. lg 
limit I, It 
' inansky, Is 
v keltCT, «jb 
Shatter, rhb 
b'Herose, lhb 
MOB, fb 



M. A. C. 

le, Cascio 
It, Cotton 
lg, Mohor 



rt. King 
re, (i ray son 

<|b, I'oolc 

lhb, Lent 

rhb, Sargent 

fb, Collins 



CHEMICAL SOCIETY BRANCH 
MEETS At M. A. C. 

Amherst was t he scene of ano'her im- 
portant conference, when on .Saturday, 
October 16, the Connecticut Valley Sec- 
tion of tbe American Chemical Society 
met here for their monthly meeting. 
Fifty men were present, twenty font oi 
whom came from outside Amherst. 

The visit of I he Society occupied I he en 
tire Saturday afternoon and evening, and 
the visitors were given a line opportunity 

to ook over A m tie i st. In the all or in, 

I lie Amherst College Chemical Labora- 
tory was inspected and then the chem- 
ists visited the Kxperiment Station, 

College Laboratory, Microbiology Build- 
ing, Dairy Laboratory. Laboratory of 
Horticulture Manufactures, and the 
Country Fair, at M. A. C 

At six o'clock, dinner was served at 
Drapai Hall, followed at K o'clock l>.\ 
the business inee.ing ami program bold 
in Slockluidge Hall. Mr. Gerald E. 

Parry '16, spoke on "Scientific Control 

on a Hubher Plantation." Mr. I 'cm 
after graduating, served here for two 
years as a graduate assistant in the 
Chemistry department, but forthcpasl 
three years he lias been working in the 
Malay States as M yeologtsi of ibe So 
ciety Internationale des Plantations, 
with headquarters at Sclanger. He de- 
scribed the methods of collecting and 
prepaiing crude rubber. Dr. 1C. K. 
Kindfu /.. Director Chemical Research, 
A-nerican Writing Paper Company , llol- 
yoke, concluded the program with an 
ill list t at ed talk on I he whole process of 
paper making, and chemical control 
involved. 

The American Chemical Society is an 
• v.--) ni /.a t ion divided into numeioiis 
local organizations all over the Patted 
Slates, t lie headquarters of the Connec- 
ticut Valley Section being at Hartford. 
During the year six meetings, similar 
lo the one on Saturday, are held at 
Hartford. Springfield. New Britain and 
other Connecticut Valley Cities. 



WORK OF TOWN PLANNINC 

BOARDS OUTLINED 



Important Questions to be Consid- 
ered by Federation. 

Town Planning Boards were formed as 
a result of efforts on the part of Un- 
American Civic Association. The work 
of these boards, which aim for commu- 
nity betterment, constitutes a large 
part of the program of t he association. 
It is the work of these boards which 
should be of vital interest to every citi- 
zen : it is the icsults of their work which 
the citizen comes across every day. 
Town planning boards have been formed 
With BO special authority lo act, and it 
is one of their hardest tasks to get au- 
thority to ensure the adoption of their 
pians or suggestions. 

The local planning boards were ere- 
atcd out of a law based upon a recog- 
nition of the necessity for detinite plans 
to control the growth and development 
of our towns. This law is supported 



by a section which reads : "The oltj 
council or other governing body iu 
cilies is authorized to make suitable 
ordinances; and towns are authorized 
to make by-laws for carrying out the 
purpose of tliis act, ami they may ap- 
propriate money therefor." 

This, as may be seen, is a general 
statement which is not compelling, and 
Which is n<>t effective. It gives the 
local boards an opportunity to act, but 
official recognition is not provided for. 
It is suggested by tbe MassactiUHCt Is 
Federation of Planning Boards that 
each board investigate t tie laws and 
statutes which determine the rights of 
municipality in relation to I lie const rue- 
t ion of st roots, sewers, waterways, parks, 
playgrounds, and other SBCb mailers, 
the authority or control of which is 
vested in the local authorities. The 
local board should be accurately in 

formed, in its circulars, the Federa- 
tion suggests laws which would be of 
assistance to the boards in carrying out 
(heir work, which includes the BCquir- 
ing <>t land for playgrounds and parks, 
the regulation of building construction. 
sanitation, public nuisances, etc. For 
instance, some cities do not allow loach 
carts to be drawn out on the streets at 
night. Many towns have rubbish bar- 
rels placed at convenient points about 
t lie town. The lunch cart lends lo 
cheapen the appearance <>f the city, 
and forces I lie respectable lunch room 
to close early in the evening. Also, 
Steps are being taken by the local 
boards, ami by the Federation, toward 
Ibe regulation of the billboard as a 
means of outside advertising. The Fed- 
eration is behind all principles which 
stand for community betterment and 
improvement in any inannei. 

Another important i|tiestion is that 
"/.oning". Satisfactory progress is 
being made in securing legislation to 
enable cities and towns to put into 
effect "zoning". It means the creation 
of districts within each of which only 
buildings of particular character can 
be built; such as residence districts, 
and commercial districts. "/.oning", 
according to the Federation, isthe most 
valuable power for municipalities to ex- 
ercise in securing orderly ami business 
like development. 

A third issue which the Federal ion of 
Town Planning Boards hopes to estab- 
lish is the formation of a Stale Housing 
and Town Planning Bureau, which will 
h« i he nucleus of the local boards. The 
Federation is at present the only agency 
through which the local boards can 
a«t. 



CAMPUS NOTE 

The Association of New Kngland 
Chapters of the Phi Sigma Kappa fra- 
ternity meets at M. A. 0.BOKI Saturday. 
A number of important ijuestions, 
which are to be presented at the COO 
vention in Chicago next November, will 
be discussed. Campbell '20 is the 
president of the association, and Mac- 
Kintosh '21 is in charge of local ar- 
rangements. 



M. Novick & A.Warren 



MEN'S TAILORS 



SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Also Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing and Repairing 

Work done while you wait — 
Work called for and delivered 

Dress Suits for Rent 



S. S. HYDE 

J*- wele I* Hlld < lptl(>illll 

l» Pleasant Street 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing 

Promptly and Skilfully Done 

Satisfaction >iuarante«(i 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 



Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILK YOU WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst • Mass. 




JiZiKXenooatinji 

jttd&ove 

and. 



%b1 



s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 20, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 20, 1920. 






QUALITY AGGIE INN SERVICE 

Sunday Night Suppers a Specialty 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

'.Continued from paste ll 



clrawinu eanl for tbe Boston meeting. 
Arthur K. lirideH, well-known Ak«h' 
football coach of former yeaiH, and 
Director Haskell of the Experiment 
Station, will «ive the New Haven meet- 
ing its full share of enthusiasm. New 
York always has a Rood meeting, ami a 
tilting celebration is assured from that 

quarter. 
The localities, witB their eaatrmen 



are: 

Cuba 

W. K. Leonard, Central Sokdad 

Cienfuegos. 

Hawaiian Islands 

Karle G. Bartletl, Kamehameha 
Schools, Honolulu. 

Porto Rico 

W. C. Forbush, University of I'orto 
Rico, Mayaguez 

California 

Berkeley, Prof. J. W. Gregg, IS49 

Glenn Ave. 
Los Angeles, K. Farnham Damon, 
535 Claremont Place, Pomona 
Washington 

Seattle, James K. Martin, Cross 
Bodine Lumber Co, 2013 Smith 
Building. 
Montana 

Bozeman, F. S. Cooley. 

Minnesota 

Minneapolis, William K. Pbilbrick, 
901 Palace Building. 

Michigan 

Detroit, Almon W. Spaulding, Hol- 

yoke, Mass. 
Fast Lansing, C. P. Halligan, I ).ik 
Hill Ave. 

Illinois 

Chicago, T. J. Moreau, American 
Park Builders, Marquette Building. 

Ohio 

Cleveland, A. S. Topper, 1900 

Kuclid Ave. 

Columbus, Ralph F. Taber, Ohio 

State University. 

New York 

Buffalo, F.N.Boland, care of Quaker 

Oats Co. 301 Peoples' Bank Bldg. 
New York City, Alfred T. Beals, 

71 West 23rd St. 
K. If. Smith, Cambridge, 

Louisiana 

New Orleans, T. H. Jones, La. Exp 
Sta., Baton Rouge. 

North Carolina 

Charlotte, Harold B. Bursley, 505 
Trust Building. 

District of Columbia 

Washington, James A. Hyslop, 
Silver Spring, Md. 

Maryland 

Baltimore, M. J. Clough, 3401 Fair- 
view Ave. 

Pennsylvania 

Pittsburg, Samuel T. Tuthill, Com- 
monwealth Building. 

Philadelphia, James E Hatchings, 
United Gas and improvement Co. f 
Broad and Arch Streets. 

State College, Farle A. Wilde, 200 
W. College Ave. 

Connecticut 

Hartford, B. G. Southwick, 308 

Church St. 
New Haven, Raymond R. Clapp, 

42 Church St. 
Storrs, H. J. Baker. 



Rhode Island 

Providence, Willis F. Fisher, 251 

Niagara St. 
Massachusetts 

Amherst, Edwin F. Gaskitt, M. A.C 
Boston H. W. Dana, 9 Oliver St., 

Salem. 
Fall River, I.Chester Poole, 204 

High St. 
GreennekLEdwin r>. Smead. 
Pittsfield, Robert If. Gibbs 57 

Taylor St. 
Springfield. Dr. J. S. Bacon, 69 

Maple St. 
Worcester, Stanley Wright, M. 5. 

Wright Co., Jackson St. 
Leominster. T. H. Reuman Hi^h 

School. 

Georgia 

Atlanta, Dr. II. E. Stockbridge, 
116 E. Hunter St. 

Alabama 

Auburn. Dr. F. L. I nomas, 

Wisconsin 

S. W. Mendum, 1039 Union Ave. 

Iowa 

Ames, W. K. Sears '15 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing pt-«|ternitV Men 

Take Notice ! 



Shorn 

Repairing 



Shoe 
Shine 



T. MIENTKAS 
— THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for Brst-elass 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

LI Pleasant SI.. Amherst. M;i- 



Rush all Freshmen with DRURY'S 

Rolls, Doughnuts and 
Pastry 



W. B. DRURY 

10 Main St., Amherst 



SHORT COURSE ELEVEN TO 

OPEN SEASON SATURDAY 

The Short foiirse football team of M. 

A. C. Marts its seas. c\t Saturday, 

when it meets bjN infield V . M . < '. A . 
Seconds on Pratt l'iel.l. S|.ri nyliehl, at 

MQ I-. m. 
Undac the eoaobini of "Km" Gravsoa 

"17, an Old Au^iestar, the two-year men 
have lieen making rapid progress. 
Thirty-live are out f<»r the team, 8 ot 
whom played here last year. They 
average 170 pounds, and are strong on 
the defensive. For the remainder ot 
the week before the name, sciiminaue 
will he held with the varsity, l'iekard, 

quarterback, has shown np especially 

well in practise. Steele,! he big fullback 
has been laid up for SOSSe time, but wll 
be in the line-up Sal unlay . The rot 
of the men are in (food shape. 

Tbe Springfield team lost T-tMo Willis- 
ton last Saturday Mcrrinian, Sherin, 
Bryan, and Anderson, all in the back- 
Held, have been doing well for the Red 

and While's sec 1 String eleven. 

Two truck loads of loyal supporters 
will accomany the team, and a haid 
foagbl name seems certain. Coach 

Grayson will probably use tbe following 

line-up. 

Girard or (Juirk, le ; Kurke, It : Mei- 
wiuorClark. In; liurnett , e : Raymond, 
rg;Snclltng,rt; Hart well, re; l'iekard, 

oh: vVlggln, lhb; Kiehardson, rbb; 
Steele, fb. 



SOPHOMORE NOMINATING 

COMMITTEE CHOSEN 

1112:5 held a class meeting ffedaesdaj 

afternoon, Oct. IS, aliei Aesesabl] with 

M ot the members present. Dowden 

was unanimously elected class football 
manage! to prepare for the coming 
Freslunan-Sophonioie game. I' Was 
voted to hold class elections semi-an- 
nually, on the fotu 1 h Pi Idays ot < tetober 
and February. After discussion as to 

how the nominating oommitte should 

be chosen, the following five men were 
elected by ballot: Friend, Batgeat, 
Beal. Hale and blade. 



F. M- THOMPSON & SON 

GOOD CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN 

Leather Coats 

Corduroy Vests 

Guyer Hats 

Hart Schaffner and Marx Clothes 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 



rco. o. ». pat. orr. 



Will help you secure "a greater yield Irom 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

tJMI0<»<O> TM[»Ml«IC«N «.tlt».'.«« CMt»:C»- C5Hf»"f 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



W. I. PALMER 



JUDGING TEAM PLACES 

WELL UP AT CHICAGO 

Ranks Ninth Among Twenty-One 

Teams. R. W. Smith '21, Scores 

First in Ayrshire Class. 

The M. \. 0. dairy juditiii" team 

stood alatb among 31 colleges from all 

itver the couutn, . in the Intercollegiate 
Dairy Cattle Judging contest, which 
was held at tlie National Dairy Show in 
Chicago, Oct. !>. 

\m:ie was represented bj K. I). Be* 

Uer, K. W. Smith, and ft, K. llnrd. who 
were accompanied by Prof. V. A. Rice, 
of the Animal Husbandry Department. 
The team was lift h in Judging Jerseys, 

•eveatb In Aysbirse, thirteenth in 
Qoeraeeys, and sereateeatb In ii"! 

steins. Kansas Stati> took lirst plsves in 
the contest. The only Kasiern eollegs 
teem which ranked above M. A. <'. was 
I'enn. State, while Conneclicnt , New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, Cornell, and 
ohio were SSSOVg the twelve ranking 

I. clow. 

The Judging took place la the Colt- 

• tun. and was very well planned ami 

en ted, nltbongb there were chances 

for argument in many classes. Hulls, 

iiiWH, and heifers from each of the lour 

dairy breeds were Judged, and the i - 

set lasted the entile day. 
It. \V. Smith who had been bigb man 

11 Judging Ayrshires in Springfield, re- 
peated this feat in Chicago. |{. D. 
Baker was third in the Jersey Judging. 
"J. K. Ilurd, who snlTered injuries on 
liis last trip In the Spring term, proved 
that he had fully recovered by pushing 
liis team mates hard in both OOUleStS. 

after resting and seetag Chicago i»y 

into en) Sunday, the team spent Mod- 

profitably by risitlng theChiesgo 

Board of Trade (grain pit), the Union 

Mock Yards. Armour's Plant, t he HoTM 
Market, and the store of America's 
ctest merchant, Marshall Field. 



PROF. WAUGH ADDRESSES 
CONFERENCE AT SPRINGFELD 



Speaks Before American Country 
Life Association. 

\t the last session of I he third annual 

ferenee of the American Country 
Life Association, at Springfield, Oct. 
is. Prof. F. A. Wauirh ot M. A. C. pre- 
tented a brief review ami civicism of 
the various agencies at work in the Held 
1 country planning, with special relet 

LO public roads, submitting at the 

. time the report of the country 
iiminK committee, of which he is 
■ h airman. 

'The criticism seems fair. ' he stated, 

bat more effort ami money have I. ecu 

'it on road construction and admin- 

1 at ion than upon planning. Very 

ly shall we find a road system in 
community fully adapted to its 
MOt needs. 
"On the whole, it does not seem de- 
bit to devise new agencies for toad 
lining, hut it may he entirely pro pel 
urge upon all town, county and state 

authorities dealing with roads the ue* 
ibllliyofmon general and thought- 
ful planning. It may be hoped and ex- 
ed. furthermore, that the national 
I ncies promoting the cause of good 





E. F. HASLAM, Mgr. J. H. LOCKHART 

STUDENT SUPPLIES 



M. M. RICHARDSON 



roads will give more attention to this 
fundamental matter. " 

Prof. Waugh advised t he employ nienl 
of technically trained men and women, 

engineers and architects, whenever any 

farm or road construction work is to be 
Undertaken, While well aware of (lie 

limited am. dint of money svllabla foi 
ordinary farm building construction, he 
urged the employment oi tbe architects 
to the at most extent possible. 
"Beyond tbis point," be added, "we 

may hope that various public agencies, 
and especially the extension service- of 
the agricultural colleges, will give 

earnest attention to all problems ol 

planning farm building." 



SHORT COURSE SENIORS 

WELCOME FRESHMEN 



Reception, Speakers, and Dancing 
Enjoyed by Two- Year Students. 

A veiy pleasant eiitei t ainmeut WSJ 
held for t lie Short Course students Fri- 
day evening, Oct. l">, when the two- 
year Seniors gars a reception to I lie 

two-year freshmen In the Drill Hall. 
Practically all of the students were on 
band to add to tbs gayoty ol lbs event, 

and went away with the Satisfaction of 

baring spent a rerj enjoyable evening 

loget her. 

During the lirst part of the evening 
the new students win- received bj Prof. 

and Mrs. Phelan. Mr. an. I Mrs. Viets. 
Mr. and Mrs. Strahn, Misses Skinner 

ami Hamlin, Mrs. Bachrach, and Mi 

French. A short talk was then given 

by Roger Eaiey of tbe S-yr. Senior Class, 
who explained the short Course and 

told of Its various activities. Prof. 

Phelan supplemented this talk with a 

word of welcome to the new student-. 

followed by K. K. Grey son, director of 
short Course athlettce. To complete 

tlif li i st part of the evening appropri- 
ately . all joined in singing the College 

song, "sons ot did Massachusetts". 

panclng was then in order until l0-4."i 
o'clock. Good music was furnished by 

en orchestra composed entirely oi short 

Course men. Not the least feature of 

i be party was t bs refreshments, consist- 
in" of the old Btandbys, sweet cider and 

doughnuts. This was in keeping with 
the decorations ol Ihc Hall, with the 

■UggestiOfl of autumn In the air. Palms 
and maple le.tv. -. with yellow and blue 

crepe paper made a pretty scene, while 
the "M" blankets of the football squad, 

which were bang on the wall, added 

greatly to the other decorations, 



TWO YEAR STUDENT 

COUNCIL UNDER WAY 



Plans Developed For Social ^Activ- 
ities. 

The short Course Student Council 

which w;i- organized last year to give 
an impetus to the college life among 
two rear students resumed iis work 
again this tall. holding weekly m e e tings 
and regulating the relationship be- 
tween the Freshmen and the second 
rear men. Tbe rep r es e ntatives bow In 

charge of the council consist of six men 
from the Senior class and tour from the 
Freshman class These are: from the 



Senior class, Steele, Trafton, Burnett, 

Whitmoie. Bnelllng, Batey; from Lbs 

Freshman class, Williams, Kettcrlcy, 

Delano, and Sanford. The officers are 

Bete] . president ; Steele, vice-president : 
Sanford. secretary and tresiiier. 

So far this fall, t he council has held 
four meetings and will continue to hold 
them ever) Wednesday night in Dean 
lunch's ofitcs in South College. At 

the beginning of the Lena the time was 

given to drawing up rules and regula- 
tions for the entering class. Among 

I he decisions was that I he Freshmen 

be required lo wear distinguishing caps. 
This has lieen carried out and for the 
lirst time the short course Freshmen 
have worn special hats so that I hey may 
he recognised from the others. The 
council has charge of t he enforcement 
of these iii!« s and thus corresponds in a 
measure to IBS four yeal senate. All 
I iishiiien infringing the rules ale 

brought up before this body. 

The council is now employed in work- 
ing up plans ioi the stimulation ofsoeial 

life among the two year men. Arrange- 
ments ale now being made lor the de- 
velopment of musical clubs and dramat- 
ics and a favorable season la expected 

during I he ensuing terms. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pena 



C. F. DYER 



"CAMOUFLAGE," IS SUBJECT 
OF DEANS CHAPEL TALK 

At Friday morning chapel, Oct, Ift, 
Dean Lewis gave a short talk on the 

aubjeel oi Camouflage." He empha- 
sized the crookedness I hat was going 
OO la polities now. and as an example 
told some ol his own personal exper- 
iences with politicians, when he was 
dabbling In polities himself. This do* 
ceill illness so prevalent among many of 

our public officers is camouflage oi the 

worst kind. They are working only 
to get the heller of somebody in an 
underhanded way. During the war. 

camouflage had sjnoble purpose,namelj . 

the protection ol humanity. "We must 
not degrade the term to convey such an 
Ignoble meaning as it seems to he doing 
at present,'' said Dean Lewis in conclu- 
sion. 



Herbert Emery 'SO is on the campus 
as assistant to Dr. Tony in the Botany 
I depart meal . 



PLAZA 

MiirttamsSna * m»m. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where tin- Heat 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Are shown. 

Program chanted daily sscapl Monday 

and Tuesday. 

KKKK'K I*. KKI.MOVr. Manager. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 20, 1920. 



FRESHMEN PLEDGED 

[Continued from i>aue 1] 

Clark, C. O'H. Beachmont 

Kilburne, JameHS. Cambridge 

I. VUliOV Clll Al.l'llA. 



Salmon, Kenneth 
Barrows, Hubert A. 
Myrick. Sterling 
Barker, John F. 
Ferranti,Kdinuiid T. 
Hill. Carrol V. 
Nichols. Arthur C. 
Bowers, Frank II. Jr. 
Steele, Charles W. 
Fernald, Lelaiul II 
luring, Kenneth F. 
White, Samuel 11. 
Davis, Howard H. 
Mader, Russell C. 
Manchester, Philip 



Need li am 

Qttloej 

Long Meadow 

West Bridge water 

West Bridgewater 

Worcester 

Quincy 

Ma i) she Id 

Marblehead 

Bedford 

Melrose 

orange 

Brockton 
Wall ham 
Fall Hiver 



A I I'll \ SlOMA 1*111 . 

Bliss, Klisha F. Jr. Springfield 



Charlestown, N r . 11. 

Kehobeth 

Wi I bra h am 

Deerfield 

Hidden 

Melville 

W 11 bra ham 

Wilbraliam 

Cambridge 

Havana. Cuba 

Worcester 

Amherst 



Cahalane, V. F. 
Carpenter, E. S 
Eaton, W. II. 
Hayes, William 
Holloway, Clarence W. 
King, K. II. 
Merrick, S. H. 
Merrick, C. L. 
IV arson, J. C. 
I'oey, Fred 
Kicker, C. S. 
Rowel I. E. j; 

Alpha Gamma Kiio. 
Bricketl, P. E. West Lynn 

Grieve, Alexander 
Humphrey, L. E 
Hutchins, O. H. 
Mac A ltt'. Norman II. 
Root, Frank E. 
ShaefTer, C. II. 
Sims, Kenneth W. 
Tewbill, Charles J. 
Witt, Earl M. 
Stevenson, Harold I). 
Jones, Allan, 1923 



went through tackle for three yards 
ami with the ball on the two yard line 
it took three plays before Capt. Poole 
finally carried the ball over for the last 
touchdown. He kicked the goal. A 
kick followed by a toucbback gave 
Aggie the ball on the 20-yard line. 
About live more rushes netted Aggie 
20 yards and the name ended with the 
ball in her possession on the 40-yard 

line. 

The game was a little dissapointing 
to Aggie supporters in that Worcester 
scored at all; but considering the 
absence of King and Mansell, who were 
in the infirmary, the team played a 
good name and showed that in the next 
two weeks it is going to take a remarka- 
bly strong offensive to break their line. 

m. A. < . 
Acheson, le 
Cascio, le 
Cottou, It 
LaTour, lg 
Freeman, lg 
Wentnosch, lg 
Macintosh, c 



important position in the college cur- 
riculum. Lieut. F. S. Snyder U. S. A. 
has been detailed to assist Commandant 
EL W. Walker, and a detachment of 17 
men has been sent to care for horses 
and equipment and perform other 
duties incidental to the administration 
on the unit. 
The tirst mounted drill was held for 

the Juniors on Monday. Ofl Friday all 

the horses will be on parade at 10-40 a. 

m. before the presidents of all the laud 

grant colleges who will be here on that 

day. 
The held south of the colleije campus 

on Lincoln Avenue is be used as the 

cavalry parade ground. 



who would make Amherst, Massachu- 
setts, and the Knited States, better 
places in which to live. 



CATSBOra KOK 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At KKATKKMT1K8 EVKKV NIGHT 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



Dorchester 

Ware ha in 

Shelburne 

Cambridge 

Bernardstoii 

Ashtield 

South Boston 

Florence 

Belchertown 

Camden, Me. 

Jamaica Plain 



Mohor, rg 
Brigham, rt 
Grayson, re 
Poole, <ib 

Lent, lhb 
Sargent, rhb 
Taiplin, rhb 
Collins, fb 
Tumey, ib 



WOHCKKTKK 

re, Brown 

rt, Bession 

rg, Harcuss 

rg, Colby 

c, Gardiner 

c, Stevenson 

lg, Bushnell 

It, Manning 

le, Colesworthy 

qb, Reed 

qb, Morse 

rhb, Needham 

lhb, (lough 



fb, Fielder 
fb, Mason 
fb, Babcock 
Score— M. A. C. 21, Worcester 6. 
Touchdowns— Lent, Sargent, Poole and 
Morse. Goals from touchdown — Poole 
I. Referee— Bank art of Dartmouth. 
Umpire Dormon of Columbia. Head 
linesman— Lark in of Holy Cross. Time 
—two 12 minute periods and two 10 
minute periods. 



WORCESTER DEFEATED 

Continued from page i 

yard penalty put Lent over the goal 
line for the first score. Poole kicked 
the goal. The quarter ended with the 
ball in Aggie's possession on their 35- 
yard line. 

An exchange of kicks took up live 
minutes of the second quarter and then 
followiug a fumble the Worcester offen- 
sive got busy and on eight line plays 
and three forward passes they marched 
down the field for a touchdown. Morse 
scored. Worcester kicked to M. A. C. 
and Lent and Sargent carried the ball 
for nine yaids. On the fourth down 
Capt. Poole shot a forward to Grayson 
who ran 35-yards before he was tackled. 
Two short rushes gave Aggie five more 
yards before the half ended. 

For the third successive time the 
quarter opened with an exchange of 
kicks between the two teams. Two 
rushes by Sargent and Lent brought 
Aggie within scoring distance but an 
intercepted forward pass spoiled all 
chances of a score here. In eleven 
short gains Worcester brought the ball 
to raidtield but was forced to kick. 
The ball was in M. A. C.'s hands at the 
end of the quarter. 

Lent and Sargent gained five yards 
and Poole made first down on a line 
buck. Another five yard gain by Poole 
put the ball near enough to the line so 
that Sargent carried it over on the next 
play. Poole kicked the goal. An in- 
tercepted forward pass and a series of 
gains by Lent and Poole brought the 
ball within the Worcester five yard line. 
Here Worcester put up the most 
stubborn resistance of the game. Lent 



CAVALRY UNIT RECEIVES 

SHIPMENT OF HORSES 

The M. A. 0. cavalry has recently re- 
ceived a shipment of M horses and two 
mules from the government stock farm 
at Front Royal, Virginia. Pending the 
completion of the new cavalry barn the 
animals are pastured on a lot adjoining 
Kast Pleasant Street. Work on the 
bain, howerer, is now being pushed 
rapidly and it will be completed in the 
near future. 

Apparently drill at M. A. C. is to 
take on a new aspect and assume a more 



ASSEMBLY SPEAKER TAKES 

NEW THEME FOR TALK 

J. H. MacFarland Raises Question 

Concerning Women in 

Politics. 

"Can we keep up with the woman 
voter'.'" was the subject of Wednes- 
day's Assembly speaker, Mr. J. Horace 
MacFarland of Harrisburg, Pa. Mr. 
MacFarland is president of the Ameri- 
can Civic Association, which has been 
holding its convention in Amherst dur- 
ing the past week end. 

"The question is,'' said the speaker, 
"why can't we keep up with the woman 
voter - .'" We are under the impression 
that women will not be able to vote be- 
cause they have not beeu trained for 
voting, yet, on the other hand, the men 
themselves have not been trained for 
that duly. Men say they belong to 
some one political party, but half of 
them do not know what that party 
stands for, and therefore act in their 
political decisions much like trained 
monkeys. There are two reasons why 
some people voie for a particular party; 
either because they heed the call of a 
politician Who claims to need help, or 
else to vote for a parly, irrespective of 
the qualifications of the candidate rep- 
resenting that party. 

Mr. MacFarland pointed out, from 
personal experience, that it is the 
women of a community who always 
start improvements, and the BMI finally 
come across with the money. It was 
Harriet Beecher Stowe who worked 
against slavery and it was Frances Wil- 
lard who commenced the drv campaign. 
In closing, Mr. MacFailand said that 
it was the duty of every voter to cast 
his or her vote for the representative 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

(Give «• a trial, 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 

G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUaS AND CARPETS 

— K. D. MAR8H K8TATK — 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

AT 

Economy Prices 



M 



The Shoeman. 



Main St., 



Amherst 



t» 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

The Collegian, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-one Index, 



Telephone 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 4S4 W 

G. M. Campbell, Secretary 175-J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 



"BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good thimjs to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 416-W) Hadler. Maw 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



F. P. Rand, Manager 
C. D. Kendall, President 
C. F. Clark, Manager 
Lorenzo Fuller, Manager 

F. A. Gilbert, Manager 
J. D. Evers, Manager 
C. W. Bunker, Manager 
L. P. Martin, Editor 

G. W. Edman, Manager 
M. F. Webster, Editor 
Frederic Howard, Manager 
C. D, Kendall, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 
Y M C. A. Howard Goff. President 



136-R 
280 
280 

8325 

8325 
416-M 

280 

8377 
280 
214 

832S 
280 

280 
8314 



Drugs, Sodas, 

Amherst, 



Cigars, 



Candy. 
Ma* 



—The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 
JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place for 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






ErR|AX?Yoft1 

\l t\ > -tit 

# OCT&S1920 
f , 1 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 27, 1920. 



No. 4 



LAND GRANT COLLEGES 
MEETING IN SPRINGFIELD 



Convention Program Ends with Visit 
to Aggie Campus. 



SOPHOMORES SUPERVISE 

FR0SH DIVING CONTEST 



Twelve Members of Freshman Class 
Take to Drink. 



Over 200 delegates attended the 34tb 
annual convention of the Association of 
Land (irant Colleges, which was the 
last of a series of conferences held this 
month in Springfield and vicinity. This 
association is divided into three sec- 
tions, one on agriculture, oue on engi- 
neering and one on home economics. 
The section on agriculture is again 
divided into resident teaching, experi- 
ment station, and extension service 
divisions. The program was planned so 
that divisional meetings usually occu- 
pied the mornings and afternoons, while 
general sessions took place in the 
evenings. 

President Samuel Avery of Nebraska 
made the opening speech. His keynote 
was, "The agricultural and industrial 
classes must have education, cost the 
public what il may." 

The discussion in the experiment 
station division centered largely on 
means for enlarging the scope of exper- 
imental work. Some of the experiment 
station experts who led these talks 
were Dr. E. W. Allen of the States Re- 
lations Service, Directors K. H. Bur- 
nett of Nebraska, Thomas Cooper of 
Kentucky, R. W. Thatcher of Minne- 
sota, U.L. Kussell of Wisconsin, F. D. 
Farrell of Kansas, F. S. Harris of Utah 
W. H. Chandler of New York. J. H. 
Lipman of New Jersey, £. It. I, infield of 
Montana, D. F. Trowbridge of North 
Dakota, F. B. Mumford of Missouri, and 
K. L. Watts of Pennsylvania. 

Among the important business accom- 
plished by the extension service was 
the recommendation made that the 
agricultural colleges have marketing 
■ nurses, paying special attention to the 
crop of the particular state in which 
the college is located. 

Secretary Merideth of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, 
spoke at the convention. He laid em- 
phasis on the importance of co-opera- 
t'on and research. Dr. Alonzo E. 
Taylor of the University of 1'enntyl- 
1 uiia, a member of II. L. Hoover's staff 
'luring the war, gave an address on 
The World's Wheat Supply and 
I'riceB." Europe's inability to huy 
wheal, for lack of goods for which to 
pay for it, explains why wheal is not at 
a far higher price than it is, the speaker 
said. 

A barbecue for the Society was held 
M the evening of October 21. at the 
grounds of the Eastern States Exposi- 
tion. The chief speakerof the evening, 
Ur. A. W. Gilbert, Massachusetts Com- 
missioner of Agriculture, sketched the 
- andiug of Massachusetts and New 
Knglaad agriculture in comparison with 
that of other localities. "New England 
1 ui raise much more food than she is 
[Continued on page 7 1 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT IS HUMBLED 

BY FIGHTING AGGIE TEAM. SCORE 21-7 



After dinner Friday afternoon, Oct. 
22, the tipper-classmen were given I he 
thrills of an old-time pond party, when 
eight unruly Freshmen were given | 
chance to explore the soft, comfortable 
depths of (he campus pond. 

Owing to the lack of material t<> 
build a suitable platform the deed had 
to be pertornied from the west hank of 
the pond. Each man. after proclaim- 
ing his sins to the public, was given a 
oiie-two-three-and-away-we-go by four 
husky sophomores, and then left to 
take care of himself as best be could. 
Lamb and Rhodes, who seemed to enjoy 
the experience a bit too well, were 
given an additional ducking to appease 
their appetites. The audience IM 
greatly stirred by the rendition of 
Yankee Doodle by one of the Frosh, 
while Beldeu showed his college spirit 
by giving a long yell for the team. 
Bowers led in the splash contest by dint 
of extra avoirdupois. The complete 
list of those who scared the fishes is: 
Beldeu, Bowers, Holtein, Holway, 
Lamb, Rhodes, Weatherwax and Wil- 
helm. 

The 2-year Seniors held a pond party 
at the same time for four of their 
Freshmen: Clougii, Hurd, Labrovitz. 
and Uussell. They used an old- 
fashioned duck iug-s tool, which, fastened 
on the end of along plank, served the 
purpose admirably. After lying down 
on the plank, the convicts were gently 
lowered into the water. As they MUM 
up they were required to give the 
reasons of their conviction, after which 
they were given another bath and 
dismissed. This method proved a 
pleasant variation from the real pond 
parly, at least from the point of view 
of the spectators crowded about the 
batiks. 



STRONGEST TEAM IN YEARS WINS FOURTH STRAIGHT GAME 



Enthusiastic Students Follow the Team. Vermont Inside the M. A. C. 12 
Yard Line Only Once During the Game. 



A hundred and Iwenty-live Aggie 
men and women motored and rode 
freights 200 miles to Burlington. V't. to 
see the varsity 'play Vermont. I'. V . 
M. had previously defeated both New 
Hampshire ami Tufts. What did those 
125 see? They saw their varsity go 
through the Vermont line repeatedly 
in the tirst quarter for two man lies 
straight down I lie ticlcl, ami at the end 
of each of these marches I hev saw an 
Aggie man cross the Vermont goal 
line. Captain I'oole with his usual skill 
contributed another point after each 
touchdown. Not satisfied with this 
I'oole carried (lie ball over (lie l T . V. M . 
line again in the third quarter. Three 
well deserved touchdowns were gain- 
ed before the Green team scored. 

Il has been .veals >n... .....!. enthusi- 
asm has been shown on the part of the 
student body as was shown on Saturday 
night when the sore was wired down 
from Burlington. The l-teshmen kept 
the chapel bell going for nearly two 



A stadium, seating «0,000,on (he same 
style as those of Yale and Harvard is 
being constructed this year at the Uni- 
versity of Washington. Western col- 
leges are not so far behind the eastern 
ones after all. 



OUR OPPONENTS SCORES 

LAST SATURDAY 



NKW HAMPSHIRE 

Cor.neticut 

SPIUNGFIKLD 
Brown 

TUFTs 
Army 



40 


a 

14 



2M 




St.mii: M. Kin*. 

Veteran ta.-kle who has b.-en playing a brilliant 

(tame all HUM. Mis work against I. V. M. 

was .-..iispb-noimly good. 

hours. The lirst I wo men to get the 
score found a drum and a life and inside 
of 10 minutes a parade had been 
formed which marched uptown and for 
nearly an hour proclaimed to Amherst 
that Aggie had won her fourth straight 
game, and best of all the Vermont 
game. 

At 10-:!0 Friday Bight 18 co-eds left 
Amherst in a truck and rode all night 
and all the morning, MO miles, to get to 



the game. That is the present spirit <>l 
the wh.de student body. 

The game itself is one that will long 
stick in t be niemoi \ of I BOM who saw It. 
(Inly once during the finite contest did 
a Vermont man cross the Aggie 12 yard 
line, and this was 011 the long forward 
pass thai gave them t heir only score. 
Il is hardly fair to give any one man 
credit but let It M enough to say that 
"(itd Mackintosh played the game ..1 
his career at center, (apt I'oole twi.e 
scored fioin within the live yaid line 
ami as usual kicked (be goal when 
.ailed on. Collins, ( .1 av son, and King 
played their usual good game, and" Bob 
Mohordispla.ved t he qiialn 1*1 hal made 
him all-scholastic lineman two years 
ago at Newton High School. 

I. V. M. stair I oil well by running 
the kickoll back 11 yards and then gain- 
ing nine yards on a line play ; hut with 

■ yard to go 1 hey encountered a stone 

wall defense anil were toned to kick on 
Ihe third play. I.clliose made ft beau 
lifulkiekof 00 yards. Collins punted 
hack on the seeoiid play. At this stage 
Acheson was injured ami forced to leave 
the game, lie has put up a line exhi- 
bition ol play sin.e Mansell was loi.cd 
to leave I he game and his absence will 
give Cascio a chance to show the NtMfl v.- 
power thai Coach (.ore po— M M . Vei 
moul was forced to pum again and il 
was here that M. \.C. slatted her lirst 
big offensive. Lent gained (1 yards 
Ihioiigh tackle and Sargent made tirst 

down. A forward pass to Clays H 

.-.Minted for tfl yards moie. Alter a 
series of short gains Saigenl again dem 
onstralcd his line open lield running and 
slid oil tackle for ten yards, (apt. I'oole 
drought the Aggie supporters to their 
feet when he went through renter for 
the first score He kirk.-.l the goal. 

Uight here it may be. interesting to 
note that a number of lulls ami Mid- 
dlebury men and a group of townspeople 
were on the bleachers cheering solidly 
for an Aggie victory. 

A few minutes later Cray son gained :i* 
yards on another line foiward ami 
shortly after Collins went over foi 1 he 
second touchdown. I'oole kicked tin- 
goal. 

Commencing the second quarter, Ver- 
mont gained :54 yards on their first two 
(days but as before were held lor downs 
and forced to kick. A penalty and sev- 
eral short gains through the line put 
Aggie in position so that I'oole could try 
a drop kick. He missed by a small 
margin and the ball went to Vermont 
on the 20 yard line. An exchange of 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 27, 1920. 



kicks netted Aggie a Blight gain before 
the half ended. 

More kicks opened the second ball, 
and after Collins and Poole had made 
long gains the ball wasloBt to U. V. M. 
They were soon forced to kick, however, 
and it seemed almost machine like to 
see the M. A. C. team go down the field 
for their third touchdown. A forward 
pass and runs by Sargent, Lent, and 
Collins brought the ball to the five yard 
line and Poole went over for the score. 
He again kicked the goal. A few short 
kicks and Vermont held the ball on 
Aggie's thirty yard line. Skelton threw 
a long forward to Semansky who caught 
the ball far over the left side line. He 
showed a wonderful burst of speed and 
raced across the two remaining while 
lines for the only score made by his 
team. Johnson kicked the goal. 

The fourth quarter proved to be a 
constant battle in centre field with 
Aggie gaining a slight advantage. 
Turaey went in for this quarter and 
made two long gains of ten and fifteen 
yards. Sargent also made some nice 
gains through tackle. The game ended 
with the ball still in midfield. 

It was a great game to win. Coach 
Gore put all his effortB toward winning 
it and the way the men fought 
for him and for the college was enough 
to put the whole college at keynote to 
see a big victory over New Hampshire. 
Saturday. This will be our big home 
game and should prove a ureal battle. 
A large gathering of Alumni is expected 
back and it only needs a lot of student 
backing to bring a fifth victory. 



VKRMONT. 

Granger, re 

Gharrity, rt 

Scbmitl, rg 
Uarris. rg 
McMahon, c 
Morgolski, c 
Purcell, Ig 
Nowland, It 
Kusmich, ll 
Semansky, la 
Pattern, le 
Skelton, qb 
Sullivan, qb 
Shutter, rhb 
Bellerose, lhb 



M. A. C. 

le, Cascio 

le, Acbeson 

lt.Brigbam 

It, Cotton 

lg, Mobor 

c, MacKintosh 

c, Freeman 

rg, M. Alger 

rg, Latour 

rt.King 

re, Grayson 

qb, Poole 



lhb, Lent 
rhb, Sargent 
rbb, Tarplip 
Johnson, fb fb, Collins 

fb, Tumey 
Socre— M. A. C. 21, Vermont 7. 
Touchdowns — Poole 2, Collins, and Se- 
mansky. Goals from touchdown — Poole 
3, Johnson. Referee — Swaffield, Brown. 
Umpire— Murray, Williams. Head lines- 
man — Delehanty. Wesleyan. Time— 16 
minute periods. 



SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

Entering into the spirit of the mom- 
ent, the fair guestfl of the various 
house parties, which were staged about 
the campus Saturday, lent their voices 
in an effort to make a cheer which 
could be beard clear to Burlington, 
when the results of the game were 
announced. 

Over 50 dusty denizens of the road 
were on hand in the Burlington station 
Saturday morning to give the team a 
good old Massachusetts cheer on their 
arrival there. Dirt begrimed sweat- 
shirts were liberally mixed in with 
leather sportcoats, presenting a unique 
sight to the gawking townsfolk. 

Various estimates of the number of 
"Aggets" who attended the Vermont 
game vary from 125 to 200. No matter 
what the number was, they made suffic- 
ient noise to qualify as first class royal 



rooters. Their appearance was an un- 
heard-of stunt in the annals of football 
at Vermont. 

Incidently the Pullman company fur- 
nished transportation to a large iiuinWr 
of Aggie men who were willing to take 
chances on forceable ejection in order 
to ride home in the style befitting the 
victors. Tbe— (till Ibis space in to suit 
yourself) goes to one "Sharkey" who 
tricked the dusky custodian of the car 
into removing the Vermont dust from 
his "kicks". 

Our own "Cap" is among the minor- 
ity of team leaders who bold down 
backfield positions on their teams. Of 
62 leading college teams but seven baft 
their captains at quarter; nevertheless 
there's no doubt in our minds but that 
"Poolie" is the real man for quarter en 
our victorious Aggie eleven, especially 
after the way be directed the Maroon 
and White offensive against V. V. M. 

All commuters have agreed that the 
Burlington trip was the best ever, and 
undergraduates are eagerly looking for- 
ward to the next Vermont game. 

Several Aggie men arrived at Am- 
herst In style Sunday morning on the 
sleeper which carried the football men. 
Some bright student hit upon the idea 
of accompanying the team en route 
without the porter knowing it. The 
scheme worked, and each bunk was 
loaded to double capacity. A few 
bunks carried only the normal number, 
much to the disgust of their occupants. 
Now that the way is lighted, we shall 
see that such a thing does not happen 
in future years. 

Thirteen Aggie co-eds bumped 
their way to Burlington to see 
the Vermont-M. A. C. football game 
last Saturday 'n a two-ton Standard 
truck. After spending hours at the tel- 
ephone trying to get some one to drive 
them up, the girls finally located Mr. 
Hunt of North Amherst who dared 
make the long, arduous trip. The 
party started from Draper Hall Friday 
night at 11, sent off by the rousing 

cheers of the less fortunate ones wh 

they left behind. After continuous 
travel, they arrived at Burlington at 
4-45, Massachusetts time, and after yell- 
ing themselves hoarse they finally lo- 
cated some one who could direct them 
to the Vermont college football Bald. 
Here they literally tumbled out of the 
truck and raced onto the field in fear 
lest the game would be nearly over, but 
to their relief it was just between 
halves. As the excited girls cut across 
the field, under the goal posts, the M. 
A. C. cheering section at the other end 
of the field caught light of. recognized, 
and greeted them with rousing cheers 
and wild waving of banners and hats. 
When the long Massachusetts yell 
ceased, the Vermont section broke out 
with cheers for the M. A. C. Co-eds. 
Both teams were bo elated over the ar- 
rival of the co-eds that each im- 
mediately made a touchdown, Poole 
making a neat kick for the goal. After 
a much appreciated supper in town, 
the tired but happy girls journeyed an- 
other 20 miles to South Hero, an island 
in Lake Champlain, where they spent 
the night in a hay loft. After six hours 
Bleep, they left at 7-15 Sunday morning, 
and started on the homeward journey. 
Just out of Burlington they picked up 
the last two homeward bound M. A. C. 
boys and carried them as far as Bran- 
don, where the boys left them to beg 
faster transportation and easier rifling. 
At Brandon tbey picked up a much 
needed lunch and continued with their 
journey, which was uneventful (?) ex- 
cept lor a four-foot pile of gravel and 
sand acrosB the road, which their daunt- 



less driver climbed over; a derick 
which they serf mined around; a slated 
hill down which the truck went on tirst ; 
and a steam roller taking up three- 
fourths of the road, making it necessary 
to push over a fence to get by. The 
girls arrived in a starving condition at 
:{-:{() a. m. Monday, having steadily 
traveled for 20 hours. The girls who 
made the trip are : Viola Cameron, Mar- 
ion Russert, Kmily Van Lennep, Mar- 
gery Richardson, Eleanor Chase, Mar- 
garet Perry, Molly Lewis, Eleanor Bate- 
man, Dorothy Turner, In/.a Boles, Mil- 
dred Lyons, ltuth Flint, Vera Smith, 
and the chaperon, who was Mrs. Cam- 
eron. 

A few of the "voyageurs" to Burling- 
tou, were pleasantly surprised when 
they awoke to find themselves in Can- 
ada. After making appropriate visits 
and obtaining the necessary supplies 
they returned to the United States! ! ! 

Ask "Bed" C '24 why the sheritT 
stopped him on his walk to Burling'on. 
"Red" had to produce his credentials. 



"Kid'* Tarplin, the husky Sophomore 
back will be a strong cuntcmler for a 
halfback position next year. 

The Sophomore class bids fair to 
break a record. Already Alger, ("ray- 
son, Tarplin, Sargent, Tumey, Mobor, 
and LaTour have made the varsity. 

George Palmer's presence as assistant 
coach is being sliowu by the improve- 
ment in kicking. 



MANY MEN TRY 

OUT FOR GLEE CLUB 

The first call for Glee Club men 
brought out 47 hopeful aspirants, and 
tbfl piano in the old chapel was put to a 
severe lest to include a wide and varied 

range of voices. 
There is some excellent material 

mi g the men who came out, and 

prospects for ■ successful season are 
exceedingly bright. .A number ot trip- 
are already chalked Dp on the calen- 
dar, and conscientious work on the 
part of I he men will result in their reap 



ing all the mote lit tit from the good 

Captain Poole was high man in scor- times to come during tbfl winter season. 

ing, with 15 points to his credit. He — ^^^ mmumuwm ^ 

also leads the team in seasons scores. '19.— Olive Carroll is instructor of 
having scored 4!» points. j Botany in Amherst High. 




If you were to vote for the most satisfactory clothing store in Northampton 
what points would you consider? How about a large stock with wide range 
in color, pattern, models and sizes? How about such well known makes as 

Hart Schaftner and Marx, and Society Brand Clothes? 

When in Hamp give us a call. We will give you uniform courtesy and 

money back if not satisfied. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

144 Main Street, Northampton 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DKAI.KKS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Candy Shot* 



Soda Parlor 



BEICKM AN'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Mmaaaohuamtta 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



FOR 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 27, 1920. 



VARSITY TO MEET N. H. ON 
ALUMNI FIELD SATURDAY 

Maroon and White Rule Favorites 
Over Tough Opponents. 

After tWO victories away Iron. In. me 
lie Ajrjjie eleven returns to Alumni 
Field on Saturday to fate the ttXOD| 
New Hampshire State team. 

Last year New Hampshire hail oae oi 

die strongest elevens in New Knirland 

tntl set a reeortl oi seven straiuht \i<- 

lories. This fall 14 letter men rt-tnrned 

Ollef* making a complete »eteran 

team, [ofourganee played this tea* 

tOfl New Hampshire lias only heen 
..red tin oiiee ami that in ft hilterl Jf 
fought eontest won hy the I' niversity 
of Vermont 7-0. She lias defeated 
Kates 13-0, Boston College 7-0. ami last 
Saturday overwhelmed < onmetictit 
tggte '»y a 40-0 si-ore. 

Under, last year'* quarterback, basre- 

c.nily returned from West Point where 

tie matriculated this fall ami com pie tea 
an all at ar backfield with Ball, the big 

mil hack. Fanner, left halfback, and 

'Dutch" Connors a particularly dan- 
• iis man. Connors is fast, heavy and 
,i line kieker. He is regarded hy some as 
an All-A mcrii an prospect. Captain 
liavitt at end, ami Dcwty ( iraham, cap- 
lain of last year's team at right guard 
are conaph UOUl men in the New llamp 
■hire line. Barrel] at center, has also 
proved himself a star and his battle 
with Mcintosh should he an luterefttlng 

ildellghl to t he fame. 

The record of New Hampshire, BOW- 
. vci . docs not in any degree eclipse t hat 
of M. A. C. i'p to date Coach Lore's 
B have not only won four consecu- 
tive iranies hut have rolled up a total 
ot 01 points against 10 of their oppo- 
nents These BgUree will ci.mpaie la- 
uirahly with those of any other New 

Englaad college. 

Captala Poole has made a record of 
19 successive goahi from touchdowns. 
I.i siocs this, his splendid field jreneral- 

ihip ami playing ability both pa offense 
and defense making him ■ quarterback 

on a par with the best. Macintosh at 
center, and King at right tackle are two 
players wbo have done great work in 
the line. Their playing has heen such 
that, were they M a larger college 
.i'ii, it minht cause considerable coni- 
in. in in football circles. 
It is not, however, the work of imlivid- 

- as much as the power of the team 
i unit which has marked the A.ggi« 

is, and it is this team power 

- h Annie supporters are counting 
'hi lo triumph over New Hampshire. 



across. From here the ball was kicked 
to midfield were Springfield made an 
end run of 4.') yards. Alter a series of 
line plunges, Kenton of Springfield 
went through for a touchdown, tcoring 
the lirBt point for the opponents. Mer- 
riman of Springfield kicked the goal. 

The second quarter bfOUghl no result 
for either side. The second hall open* 
ed with Springfield kicking off, the hall 

Doming into the hands of t he I wo-ycar 
men on the 88 yard line. Here (he 
Auuie men made two downs before the 
ball was taken by Bpringfield. Aggie 

was penalized f» yards twice. A pass by 

Kenton of Springfield was Intercepted 

ami Annie made 1M \ards in line 

plungee. Bpringfield fumbled lor a loss 

of 10 yards, and Aggie blocked Kenton's 
kick which he recovered behind tie 
goal for a safety which made a score 
of two for the two-year men. 

In the last quarter, Aggie started on 
the 88 yard line. Bpringfield lost on 
downs and several passes. Kenton 

paaaad to Haley for a 10 yard gala i»ui 

his next pass was intercepted by Steele, 
A pass by Steele was intercepted 
by Kenton who went down to the 
Aggie 1 yard line on an end run. 
Four plungei carried the ball across 
but the kick went wide. Lineup: 

TWO VI Vli. BPBIHOMELD SECOND, 



SPRINGFIELD SECONDS DOWN 
TWO YEAR TEAM 132 

Coach Grayson's Team Displays 
a Stellar Defensive. 

In a name on Pratt Held, last Satur- 
daj afternoon the Bpringfield Collage 

I.! team siieceded In downing the 

1 1 team by a score of 13-2. The 

rear men were handicapped by the 

that they were outweighed 

•a little and 'net with little sile- 
nt heir forward passing game be* 
• lit Steele being injured. The 

depended a good deal on line 

bucks but were able to make live li ist 

soiree While Springfield netted twelve. 

name started with Springfield 

Ing oil. The two-year men ran the 

■ iheii 40-yard line where they 

held for downs. Bpringfield was 

i red •"> yards but were able 

the ball down to the op- 

| •"> yard line but did not net it 



Hart well, re 
Bnelllng, it 

Met win, in 

Raymond, t 
Burnett, Ik 

liit (erly, It 

fJerimoudy, le 

I'ickanl, qb 
Richardson, rhb 
Wiggin, lhb 
Burke, fb 



le, Drew 

it. Stevens 

In. McAiihur 

c, 1 1 os ley 

rg, Bullock 
it, Cartel tan 

re, Leonard 
qb, Kenton 

Hih, Bryant 

rhb, Merriain 
fb, liranaw 



Beore Bpringfield IS, Two-year men 
2. Substitutes Two-year, Keating for 
llartweii, kfagorefor Richardson, Steele 
tor Burke, Gerard for Keating; Bpring- 
field, Slmmone for Stevens, Strcvcy for 
Bryant, Aahbrook for liuiloek, Burai 

for Simmons, Flamy for Leonard, 
Allen for Bragaw, Stevens lot* Hums. 
Touchdowns— Kenton, Mcrriam. Coals 

from touchdown— 'Herriam. Safety — 
Hinton. Helena— K. L. Williams, 
Bpringfield. Umpire V. K\uu, Bprlaa> 

tield. Head linesman— A. C Hubbard, 
..niherst. Time — IS minute periods. 



Y. M. C. A. ORGANIZING 

FOR YEAR'S WORK 

Moody '22 to Head Deputation Work. 
The V. M. C. A. is gradually getting 

thine,s worked out so that it can under- 
take this year some of the work that it 

baa done In previous years. Owing to 

the fact that there is no paid secretary 
tu help this year, the Cabinet is Working 
under ditliciillies. However, in the 
near future it expects that it can begin 
actual Work. An employment bureau 
for Saturday jobs is one of the first 
matters that will he taken up; Hible 
and Mission Study classes will also he 

organised soon. 

On Sunday, <><t. 81, the lirst of a 
series of trips will be made by a depu- 
tation team under the leadership of 

Kenneth M ly. 'I'l. The men will 

visit West ( utntninjzton, a small village 
in the Hampshire Hills, where they 
will either lake over the church service 
ui hold seme suit oi Sunday entertain- 
ment. Mr. .1. B. Reynolds, v. If. c a. 
Secretary lor Samphire Couaty, baa 
done good work in coaching the team, 
and more trips an- to be made later in 
the year. as tlnse goes on it is hoped 

that other WOTI can he undertaken and 
that the Cabinet can mat e this a suc- 
cessful year despite its handicaps. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

COME ON FELLOWS 

— TO THE— 

Odd Fellows' Hall. Every Saturday Night. 
JERRY'S JAZZ BAND 

GRANGE STORE 

Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 



SEE OUR LINE OK 



Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hose for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A good 
assortment of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



RnilLIMID ISD1 

Stkphen Lank Foi-cjkr. dne»i 

MANI'MI'l'I'HINII JKWMI.BRN 

1RO BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

OLUH AND OOIiLEUE 

1MN8 AND RINUH <* 

SOU), « II. VMM and mnmi Mmuu. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



Callage Jawalry < uff Link*. Hoft Collar Pins. 
Urea* Hull Seta. Violin. Hanjo. Mandolin Htrlnga 

Flee Watch Repairing, alan Brakan Laaaaa 

Kai>lared >'rou<i>tly. 

32 Main Street. Amkarit. Ml 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 

All good fertilizrrs make crops grow. 

HIGGINS' MAKES THEM GROW BEST 

(We don't advertise, we're just telling you). 

HICGIN* '07 



RUSSFLL Ift 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



I^e»JeSO*« 



hoe 

SPECIAL 



tore 



$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 

MOEANDI - PROCTOE COMPANY 

Manufacturers institution Cooking Apparatus 



of 



86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON 



£&rp*rvter & iMorehoust, 

PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherst, Maas 



I 



The MMsachusette Collegian, Wednesday, October 27, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 27, 1920. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIA^ 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of tbe Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOAKD OF BOTTOM. 



UnOOM* P. Maktin tl. Kciltor-ln-Chlef 

IOBSSI I.. .Jonkh '21 Manwlnn Kdttor 

Abbociatk EnnoKS. 

Gkorok W. Bum an '21 

Kksnkih K. Bahnahd '22 

8TANI.KV W. ltliOMI.KY "22 
PAUL I.. Ill UNFIT 'Ti 

HollAKT W. BVKIMi '22 

liKI.MNU K. .lACKHoN '22 
JOBS M. WlllTTIKK '23 
1.. H. Akhinoton "■ 



Two-Year. 
The recent agitation on tbe part of 
tbe two-year men to secure separate 
ebapel exercises is in linewitli their 
newer stunt of attempting to secure the 
abolisliinentof an unpopular course by 
means of petition. Fostered by a noisy 
minority, for a moment, t lie ideas have 
seemed to be about to succeed. It is 
well that colleges are not by such 
minorities. Chapels, required courses, 
ami siieh like, have reasons for their 
existence too numerous to mention in 
these columns. They have been estah- 
lished only as the result of years of ex- 
perience. They are not to lie destroyed 
by an uproarious groupof sub-freshmen. 



OWN HALL 



Thursday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Friday 

Hat. at 3 
Eva. at 8 



Hitchell Lewis and ■•»•■ 

Ferguson in "Burning Day- 
light," from Jack London's 
supreme novel of the Frozen 
North and New York. 
Path* News Hmtt and Jeff 
Teaics Cemeefr 

OliveThesaasUhelate Mrs. 
Jack I'ickfordHn ••feetllghts 
and Shadows," the story of 
the Itfe of a Broadway favor- 
ite, with many glimpses Be- 
hind the Scenes." 

Scenic reel 

2-reellW-VCe»edy 



HllSINKKS DKI'AKTMKNT. 

Hekhkkt I.. Ok.k.k '21. Husliiess Manager 

Kvk.kki r C. I'KKsn.N '21 Advertising Manager 

Ciiaki.es A. BOOK '22 Circulation Manager 

Mvhon <:. Mikhav '22 

Hlll.l.K.V Willi TAKKIt '23 

OWKN K. lOISOM '23 



COMMUNICATION 



Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eve. 2 shows 
6-45, 8-30 



Subscription $2.(H) per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

BnteredM second class matter atthe Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for in section 1108. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Athletes. 



It is one of the peculiarties of this 
colleges system that undergraduates 
that are helping to push M. A. C.'s 
name and fame up into the skies are 
having (linieulty in securing financial 
aid throiiuh student labor. There are 
on the football squad men whose finan- 
ces are in dire need of replenishment. 
These men cannot secure jobs because 
others, who are not particpating in stu- 
dent activities, already have them. In 
other caseB athletes have been forced 
to retire and devote their time to a job 
because minor adjustments would not 
be made by those in cbarue. 

When the older men of the senior 
class were Freshmen, their waiters 
were men who were leaders in college. 
They were looked up to and respected 
by the men on their tables. Is this 
true at present in the dining hall— de- 
cidedly not. 

These conditions could and should he 
remedied. The Coi.i.k.oi an does not 
advocate hold'nm forth tinancial induce- 
ments to athletes to attract them to M. 
\.C Hut it does believe that those 
men who have made good in collegiate 
activities and are in need of financial 
aid should be given first opportunity 
as far as possible at the varons student 
positions about the campus. In some 
eases an adjustment of conditions will 
be necessary. This can be accomplished. 



To mi Knnoit O* thk Coi.i.koian : 

The committee in charge of the Allan 
|,c.»n l'ond Memorial Fund wishes to 
announce that representative contribu- 
tions from undergraduate, alumni, fac- 
ulty, and home town friends amount- 
ing to nearly *r>(H> have been received. 
The plan that the fund would represent 
subscriptions from as many individuals 
as possible has certainly be fulfilled, as 
over MO individuals have contributed 

thus far. 

The committee has taken out ^"iUO in 
Liberty Honds and tbe permanent in- 
come from the bonds will be used to 
annually award the Allan Leon Pond 
Memorial Medal. The medal is to be 
presented at the close of each football 
season to the member of the football 
team whose playing during the season 
lias been the greatest credit to the col- 
lege. The player to receive the honor 
is to be selected by a committee made 
up by the Joint Committee on Intercol- 
legiate Athletics. 

Last June quite a number of the un- 
dergraduates requested that opportun- 
ity to subscribe to the Memorial Fund 
should be ottered in the fall, and the 
committee wishes to state that such op- 
portunity still exists. 

Original designs for the medal have 
been solicited. The permanency of the 
award having been assured the com- 
mittee will apply further contributions 
to the securing of a medal of original 
design and to enable the committee to 
present the die to tbe college together 
with the trust tund. 

(Signed) H .utoi.n M. GOBS. 



Monday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Charles lay and Colleen 
Moore in "The Egg Crate 
Wallop," by Julien Joseph- 
son. He started out wrest- 
ling egg crates in the country 
and won the girl and a for- 
tune in the prize ring. Don.t 
fall to Bee the bout. 

"Hidden Dangers." serial 
Pathe News Comedy 

Nazimova in "The Heart 
af a Child." 7 reels. The in- 
comparable star In a living, 
human romance of Ume- 
house. London theatrical life 
and British aristocracy. 

Pathe Review 

2- reel Comedy, 
"Bringing V p Father," series. 



INFIRMARY NOTICE 

1. Visiting Hours: 

2-00 v. M. to 6-00 p. M. and 6-00 p. M. 
only. 

2. Out-Patients. 

Out-Pat ents will be received at the 
Infirmary only between the hours of: 
6-00 a. m. to 12-00 (noon) and 2-00 
p. m. to 8-00 P. M. 
(Signed) Chas. E. Mabsuall, 
Supervisor. 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
Ammtmur Oavmloplng mini Printing 



Hills Studio-Phono 456-K 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

St udio, MASONIC BLOCK.Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

— Popular with M. A. C. Men — 

Next Assembly, FRIDAY, Nov. 5, 8-00 p.m. 

Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Worthington 



UNITY CHURCH 

HENRY G. IVES, Minister 

Invites you to its home life. 

Come and get acquainted. 

No creedal tests. 



I Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real Bargains in 

HI6H GRADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SALE! 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 



19 Pleasant Street, on your way up town. 



SUNDAY PREAGHIN6 SERVICE, 
10-45 A. M. 

SONG AND PICTURE SERVICE, 
7-30 P. M. 



Pep. 

Among the must agreeable features of 
Saturday'! football game was the hearty 
support given the team by the stu- 
dent body. The record of the game 
will go down in history as one of the 
•oeppiest" ever, both as to playing and 
support. No alumnus present could 
have possibly suggested "Things ain't 
what the used 10 be." Katber, "This 
bunch has got the real Aggie spirit." 

The old-time pep is coming back. 
The team is doing more than its share. 
You students, keep the pep coming and 
help them put across the biggest and 
best season in the history of M. A. C. 
football. 



COMPETITION OPENS WITH A 
GOODLY DISPLAY OF TALENT 

The Coi.i.koian competition is now 
on and will continue through to Febru- 
ary 1921. There are several promising 
candidates among both Sophomore end 
Freshmen competitors and from pres- 
ent indications there will be quite a 
strife for the positions on the board. 
A standing of the competitors will be 
published within a week or two. 

Those competing for positions on the 
editorial board are as follows: Sopho- 
mores, Hallett, Slade, Irish and Fuller; 
Freshmen: liilski, IJrunner, MacAfee, 
Pliss, Steere, Bartlett. Wood, Misses 
I,abrovit/., Wood and (Irieger. Business 
Department compel Mors are Holteen. 
Barteaux, Lamb and MacCaulay. 

The competitors for the editoral staff 
should frequent the office in North Col- 
lege as much as possible and especially 
Monday evenings. Those who don't 
know their assignments, see Edman 
competition manager, at once. 




Why do we call 'em *" Scotch 
Mists"? 

Because they won't wet through 
even in a real Scotch mist — and 
what's wetter ! 

Our own idea — attractive, ser- 
viceable, rainproofed overcoats. 

•IteoiKterfl Tro'lemttrk. 

Rogers Pert Company 



The Sophomore Class will have a 
large delegation of Freshmen to pre- 
sent to the Senate in the near future. 
Fear of the early morning dew is rum- 
ored as one of the major offences. 



Broadway 
at 13th St. 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 



Broadway 
at 34th St. 



There's Just One 100$ Efficient 

Cream Separator 

AKI) THAT'S THK 

01 LAVAL 

For Forty Years the World's Standard 



There may be a half-dozen plows, wagons, 
tractors, aotos or other farm equipment to 
choose between, but no would-be Imitator 
or utilizer of expired De Laval patents has 
yet produced a cream separator comparaMe 
with the De Laval. 

First in the beginning. De Laval machines 
have led in every step of cream separator 
improvement and development. Every year 
has presented some new feature or better 
ment. and the 1920 machines are still better 
than they have ever been before. 

If you haven't seen or tried a new l*!* 
De Laval machine, any local agent will b« 
glad to afford you the opportunity to do so. 

If you don't know the nearest De La^sl 
local agent simply address the nearest main 
office, as below. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 

166 Broadway 29 K. Madison St. 61BealeSt. 
New York Chicago San Francisco 



Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren *t *t Bt st 

NEW YORK CITY 



50 000 Branches and Local Agencies 
the World Oier 



tiui 



3 



GETTING RESULTS 

T is the aim of tiny progressive institution to render service of the highest 

type. It litis alwiiys hecn our aim to get the hest the market afforded. 

At this time our suits and ov«>reoats reflect the policy of this Store «tf 

Service, namely "Money's worth for money spent." 

More than a Toggery — 

A College Institution. 



STATISTICAL WIZARD TO 

SPEAK WEDNESDAY 

linger Ward liabsoii, president of Hab- 
son'B Statistical Organization of Welles- 
ley Hills, Mass . is i. » address the stu- 
dent body at Assembly on Wednesday. 
Nov. 3. This is a splendid opportunity 
to see and hear a great business man. a 
man who has pushed bis way throiiuh 
almost insurmountable obstacles, and 
who has developed, since ltM>2, what 
was then an almost uuheard of business 
into tbe largest statistical organization 
of its kind in the world. 

He was born in Gloucester, the son of 
a merchant in that town, and he bagal 
early to show an exceptional interest 
and ability in business. He worked 
when other boys were playing, because 
he liked to work. He craved to ac- 
complish thiugs. He graduated from 
tbe civil engineering coiuse of Mass. 



institute of Technology in impn. but be 

never did any actual coiisi ruction work. 
Alter college he worked in :i Boston 
bank, compiling statistics which weie 
used in t be bank's business. 

In MM, serbiiis 111 health forced him 
to give ibis up, and be began to cast 
about lor a means of employment whicb 
would permit him to live in the open 
air. He conceived the idea of analyz- 
ing reports and tabulating figure*! (0 be 
furnished several banks, thus provid- 
ing information whicb each bank had 
previously been collecting for its own 
private BM. This means ot saving 
much costly duplication of effort was 
soon sought alter by many banks. Bab- 
son's business grew, lie began to pub- 
lish new kinds of statistics and figures, 
(bat brokers and other business men 
could use. Constant l\ enlarging its 
scope, and becoming tunic and more 
useful to liio business wmld, Baboon's 



early work has grown to great propor- 
tion. And during all these years he 
has been lighting ill health. He has 
done practically till ef his work out of 
doors, and even bis business nllice has 
open windows on three sides during the 
coldest winter weather. 

Besides running bis statistical organi- 
zation he has found time for lecturing, 
and foi considerable writing: ami he 
founded recently a brand new phase of 
bis work, the Itahsmi Institute for train- 
ing business executives. 

Roger Baboon will surely have a 
worth-while message, next Wednesday, 
for Aggie men and women, the message 
ol a man who has done things. 



Donitza Arangelcovich who came to 
tbe United s lates from Serbia, Nov. 1919 
and who has been studying English in 
Vo i li Carolina College has enteied M. 
At. 



' 






hi'' * ■"*■ n 




WD 




MARK 



c w 



! j' -■ 



DON'T take a fellow's pipe. Fake some other possession. 
Because wrapped up in his pipe is a fellow's peace of 
mind, his relaxation, his contentment. This is more than 
true if it's a W D C Pipe, because then a good smoke is multi- 
plied many times over. Our special seasoning process takes 
care of this by bringing out all the sweetness and mellowness 
of the genuine French briar. Just you go to any good dealer 
and select several good shapes. Put them in your rack. 
Smoke a cool one every time, and you'll be well on your 
way to pipe-happiness. 

WM. DEMUTH 8c CO- NEW YORK 

WORLDS LARGEST PIPE MANUFACTURERS 



Four women have been appointed in- 
structors in physics at M. I. T. to leach 

"Physics Hunkers." Attention, ye 

oiiglil-lo-be physicists of M. A. C. 



M. Novick & A.Warren 



MEN'S TAILORS 



SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Also Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing and Repairing 

— Work done while you wait — 
Work called for and delivered 

Dress Suits for Rent 



S. S. HYDE 

j««-w-«- 1 *- •• stsi.i Ojptloianm 

UJ rieaaant St oil 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing 

Promptly and Skilfully Done 

Satisfaction fiuaratitred 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - • Mans. 



J/altfe/iouati/ig 

Xidti/ove 

and 




"\yanaf 
cf/ioc C/ea/ury 

I3.7?rniti/£t ' 

. : 7o/inJ/l l Dcaa>n. .yfy. 



s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 27, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 27, 1920. 






ES AGGIE I 

OPEN FROM T-OO A. M. TO 11-00 P. M. 

Complete stock of Student Supplies, Cookies, Candy and Tobacco 
NEW LINE OF COLLEGE SEAL WRITING PAPER 



7-30 



7-<M> 



7-40 
tWK) 

H00 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wkhnksiiav, Octoukk 27. 

,, M .— Ajjrieultural Economic* 
Club MeetlnR. Clark Hull. 

TlUUKKAV, <>< TOISKIC 28. 

I-. M.-Hand Rehearsal, Social 

I'nioll HoolllH. 

Kimday, OOTOSUI 20. 
\. \i.— Chapel. 
,, M ._ Hotter Doister Ifeelleg, 

Diaper Hall. 
,. M __M ils „ Keating, Dril Hall. 
S \ 1 1 itn.w. ()( roiiKit 30. 

WMI r \i. --Football, M.A.O. vs. Bhodt 
Island Stale College, Alumni 

Field. Amherst. 

3-00 i>. M.— Football, Afgls Fretb»M 

vs. North Adams Hlgb School. 
Freshman Field. 
Monday, Novi.mhku 1. 
7-40 a. m.— Chapel. 

TtMOAT, Xovkmiiku 2. 

7-30 p. m. -Fosnology Clnb Meeting, 

French Hall. 

7 .. {u ,. M _<Hee Club Heheursul, Room 
114, Stoekbrldge Hall. 
\Vki>nk.hi>ay, Novkmukk 3. 

3-(H) p. m. -Assembly. Speaker, Mr. 
Holier W. BabeOB, Welleslev 
Hills, l'resident of Habson's 
Statistical Or^ini/ation. 

E. L. MORGAN SPEAKS ON 

WORK OF RED CROSS 



CHANGES IN WORLD 

AGGIE NIGHT PROGRAM 



Former Faculty Member Gives In 
teresting Assembly Talk. 

Dr. K/.ra L. Moraan of Washington, 
D C was the speaker at Wednesday's 
Assembly. l»blng"Wbj Men Fail" as 
his subject. Dr. Moruan is an eld M A. 
C. man, havinu been connected with the 
Kxtension Service. At present he ll 
workinu on tOW* community problems 
under the auspices of the Bed Cross. 

The speaker pointed on! that a ureal 
nlil nv men do not make good because 
they do not know how to lead people. 
Taking the development of agriculture 
as a menus to bring out his idea, he 
showed that the farmer is noi willing to 
accept improvements on fertilizers, soil- 
ing, or orcharding, and so the farm 
bureau funis it necessary ts employ men 
who are leaders, men who are curable 
of convincing the farmer that his old 

methods are wronu- 

'The measure of the man today is 
not 'Are you a college gradual*,' or 'Do 
you come from a good family,- but Tan 
you deliver the good.?'" said Dr. 
Morgan. "And the American \W,\ 
Cross is an organization which tests a 
man in this way. The Ked Cross has 
lived up to its reputation of ' Americas 
Watch-dog" on account of its being 
made up of energetic, resourceful 

leaders." 

Dr MoTgma attirmed that the Red 
Cross ofbJN exceptional positions to 
physical eimliieer^pubr.c health nurses. 
disaster and junior work specialists, 
and home service secretaries, one ot the 

prime requisites being a college train- 

"la conclusion l)i. Morgan showed 
that the principle of "Noblesse Oblige- 
in respect to the college man is still 
true and that men can not fail if they 
possess the qualities of clean, construc- 
tive leadership. 



The Co-eds are to participate in World 

Aggie Night; this baa been definitely 

decided, and plans are now btlBg made 
for the dinner which will l»e held at 
the Hotel Bellevue. BootOB. All ar- 
rangements are to be made with Mrs. 
Mae Holden Wheeler, 18 Stanton St., 

Dorchester. 

This is the lirsl event of its kind in 
the annals Of the histoy of M. A.C 
women students. At least eleven yoiin« 

women are expected to be nxeeeat at I 

the dinner to do their bit towards a 
successful oelebratiOB. The alumnae 
are especially anxious to have Mrs. 
Rutterlield present at their meeting as 
a special representative from the col- 
lege. 
The dinner nt Amherst promises limn 

all Indication* to be aa enthusiastic 

one. About one hundred men are 

ex peeled to be present, from Greenfield, 
Northampton, Boot h liadley Falls, and 

the smaller towns in this district. 
The list of speakers is in charge of the 

tousimaster, Mr. George Chapman, but 

definite plans have not vet been made. 

Attention is called to several changes 

in the list of meetings, since the publi- 
cationollhe last list. The Baltimore 

■Mating has beta canceled, and the 

alumni there are to join t he Wnshinii- 
toii alumni with their dinner. The 
meeting scheduled for Leominster is to 
he held in Filchbui" Instead. The 
Cuba gathering will be at Havana, and 
there will also he meet lags at Albany, 
\. Y.. and Madison, Wis. 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 

Shorn 

Repairing 



Shorn 

Shine 



T. MIENTKAS 

TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for tirst-class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleaaanl St., Amherst. Mass. 



Fraternity Men 
Take Notice ! 

Rush all Freshmen with DRURY'S 

Rolls, Doughnuts and 
Pastry 



W. B. DRURY 

10 Main St., Amherst 



AMERICAN SOCIETY OF 

AGRONOMY CONVENES 



S. B. Haskell Elected Vice-President 
at Banquet in Draper Hall. 
The American Society of agronomy 

held its annual meeting at Springfield 
on the 18th ami lfHb of this month. 
The program included a symposium on 

the leaching of Agronomy and use of 
lime For agricultural purposea. The 

meetings were well attended, and 
at four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. 
the 10th, the members made a tour 
through Holyoke, Northampton, Sun- 
derland and Amherst, when- the pro- 
gram for the eoavention was continued. 
Agronomists from all over the country 
were present, some of whom had never 
seen the intense specialized agricultural 

methods of the C lecticut Valley, and 

who were at this time given a good op- 
portunity to see how the tobacco and 
onion growing industries are carried on 
in this section. About 40 visitors met 
at the college and opportunities were 

given for inspecting the experimental 
plots and equipment at Stockbridge 
Hall the college staff volunteering con- 
veyance by automobile. The program \ 
was brought to a close with a banquet j 
and business meeting at Draper Hall. 
Here an election of officers for the coin- 
ing year was held. Prof. C. A. atooers, 
Tennessee, was elected president, S. 15. 
Haskell of M. A. C. vice-president, 
and P. E. Brown. Iowa, secretary and 
treasurer. 

Those present at the meetings from 
the college were Professors Beaumont, 
Jones, Crocker, and Thelin from the 
Agronomy department and Director Has- 
kell and Mr. tiaskili of the Experiment 
Station. 



F. M- THOMPSON & SON 

GOOD CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN 

Leather Coats 

Corduroy Vests 

Guyer Hats 

Hart Schaffner and Marx Clothes | 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 



nca. u. s. pat. orr. 



Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

mm ' "" "*"" " ""* 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



WHEN YOU BUY 



Clothes and Furnishings, go to F. M. Thompson & Son. Show our card or 
mention our name, and bring the slip you receive from them to our store. 
You will receive 2? of your purchase in trade, FREE. We have granted 
such premiums already to a large number of students. 

IT WORKS TRY IT 



SABRINA YEARLINGS 
DEFEAT M. A. C. FRESHMEN 20-0 

Practice Scrimmage Results in Defeat 
of Aggie 1924. 

In a practice frame slaiic. 1 on Alumni 

Field last Tnursdry, the K, a. c. 

Freshmen were defeated l»y t tie Am- 
herst tirst year men by a 30-0 score. 

The Aggie d put up ■ same ii«lit 

lint were outplayed by the heavier 
V nihersl team which succeeded in push- 
inu the hall over the goal line once In 
each of the last three periods. One of 
these touchdowns came as a result of an 
intercepted forward pass on the thirty 
yard line hut the others wcic earned l>y 
Straight rushes and end runs. The 
latter especially netted long gain* for 

\mherst, and one of tin esiiltedill 

ilie lirsl s .• alter the Freshmen had 

held for three plays I aside their own 
live yard line. The last touchdown 
came after two successive fumbles by 
the M. A. C. backs. On the second of 
these the ball was recovered by Am- 
herst and a moment later was carried 
between t he jjoal posts. 

The aame was in the nature of a 
praetlee eertmmage. All ofteePreeb« 

men candidates were given a chance to 
prove their worth and Coach .lakeinan 
tried out some new combinations in the 
backlield. 

On Saturday as an added attraction 
to the Varsity game the Freshmen will 
play North Adams on Alumni Field. 
The North Adams team is a heavy and 
last aggregation and is rated as one ol 
the best High school teams in Western 
Massachusetts. 

Edmund T. Ferraati of West Bridg- 
water has been elected captain of the 
10M outfit. He plays a stella game at 

quarter, thong* without previous foot- 
ball experience. 



LAND GRANT COLLEGES 

[Continued from |«aire ll 

raising,' 1 Dr. Gilbert declared— "and it 

il to the advantage of industrial man- 
-. as well as fanners ami the con- 
sumers is general, to aid in Ihedeve]- 
opment of agriculture as much as 
possible." 

<»n Friday October 22. all but the 
engineering division, which visited the 
institute of Technology at Cambridge, 
x l;i»s , went by special trolley, througb 
Holyoke, to M. A. C. 

Mter making an auto tour of the 

pus. the delegates listened to 

F. A. ffangh, who described the 

'"•auties of Ag^ie. and told of the 

features of the institution. They then 

irated into small groups and mads 

' »its to the difTerent departments, 

being guided by professors and depart - 

loads. A complimentary laneb- 

• . which consisted almost entirely of 

.' Is glOWH on the College grounds, 

Stet served at Draper Hall. 

Society returned to Springfield 

IJ ot Northampton. To cheer the 

■ward journey the Horticultural 

art men t famished so ample supply 

i. while the Kxtension Service 

tahed cigars, presumably made 

1 OnneCtiCttt Valley tobacco. 

I 0. Hills of Vermont, who has 

led many of the past conventions 

•and Grant Colleges stated that the 
'mi for this year was the best 
in his memory. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Delta Phi A I phi announces t he pledg- 
ing, ot Nondor PorgSS '24 ot ll.vde Hark. 

and of Philip Gold '2:1 of Boxbury, 

The two year girls attended the 

Springfield game traveling there by 
truck Saturday, Oct. 2:1. 

The Senior 2 year girls held a bacon 
bat anil hike for the Freshmen 2 year 
girls on Sunday, Oct. 17th. 

Jean Browning who was at If, A.C. 

a- an unclassified last year is bow at- 
tending the University Ol Maine. 

Fanny Knapp has a position on the 

Cutter Farms, Draont. she was at M. 

A. C. as an unclassilied student for two 
years. 

President Butterfieid was reelected 

president of the American Country Life 
kSSOCiatiOB at its recent convention ill 

Springfield. 
The co-eds will bold their Bret annual 

Mountain Day next Sunday Oct. U, 
They will hike to Mt. Toby and will 
Spend t he day t bete. 

Harold F'.. Bobbins formerly Professor 

of PhysleS at If. A.C. has recovered 
from bis reeent operation and has re- 
turned to his home on NiiMine, Avenue. 

The girls of the freshmen ami sopho- 
more classes have been baring Instruc- 
tion and praetlee is basket ball on the 
Alumni field court under the supervis- 
ion id" Mrs. Hicks. It is hoped thai de- 
finite teams can be picked so that inter- 
class games may be held in the near 
future. 

Ficshnian class ollicers recently 
elected are: President, Kenneth Salmon 
of Needhain; vice-president, C. V. 
Hill of Worcester: secretary. K. F. 

Kennedy oj Cambridge; treasurer, c 

W.Steele of Marblehead : serjeant-at- 
arms, Bobert Marrows ot (/uincy: das- 
captain, C O. Clark of Reachinont : 
class historian, R. K. Steere of Che- 

paehet , It. 1. 

The students of 'he M . A.C. were 
tendered a rccept ion and dance by the 

the Unit] Church on Tuesday, Oct. lfttb 

from ?-M p. m., to 10-SO r. m. The 

patrons and patronesses were Lev. and 
Mrs. Ives and Prof . and Mrs. Patterson. 
A very enjoyable evening was spent by 
about 2IM) students including the co- 
eds who were I he guests ol honor. Re- 
freshments were served and the danc- 
ing from WO to lO-JM) was enjoyed by 
all to the music which was furnished 
by an M. A. C oichestra- 

Ali Federal Hoard men were excused 
from classes from ll to 18, Thursday 

morning for a meeting in Bowker Audi- 
loiiiim. Mr. Novitski, the Federal 
Hoard Co-Ordiaator at M. A. C. sjioke 
lirst, giving the new men some points 
on the rules ami regulations ot the Fed- 
eral Hoard. Daniel .1. Curran 'lb ol 

the Boston Office, who Is in charge el 

the Agricultural work of the whole dis- 
trict then spoke, it was requested 

that the Federal Hoard men consider 

themselves ssmucfa Aggie mea a- the 

regular Students, and that they partic- 
ipate in all activities. Mr. ' iirran en- 

I eouraged the work of the new M. A. C. 

Federal Hoard Club, and suggested that 

they tiive entertainments. F'ederal 
> Board men were asked not to loaf 
around South College, which glVOS I 
bad impression. 



FIRST INFORMAL 

SET FOR NOV. 6 

In Chapel, Friday morning, Oct. 22, 
the student body contributed |60 toward 
the deficit of ,s7;, which was incurred 
last year in running the liiforinals 
.liislin .1. McCarthy, '21, Chairman of 

the Committee, was well pleased with 

the expression of sentiment of the 
student bod) toward these dances, and 
it has been decided to have an Informal 
once a month if possible. The lirsl one 
of the year will be held in the Drill 
Hall. Saturday. Nov. tl. The name with 
Hbodc Island Stale College will start at 
(wo o'clock, and daaeiafl will start at 

half -past three. Supper will be served 

in Draper Hall from 600410, alt.i 
Which dancing Will be continued until 
0-15, when most of the guests miisi 
leave to e,.| rout lions for home. 

Tickets will cost either H.69 o» 04.00, 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



CROSS COUNTRY TIME TRIALS 
WON BY WOODWORTH 23 

At :i r. m. Saturday, the Inlenlass 
I rose < •■nut i > Hun began at the Drill 
Hall. Thirteen men started ami 12 lin- 
isbod at the Athletic Field. The course 
covered four miles of very rough hill 
and marsh uround, and was won by 
Woodworlh '2:1 in the very fair time id 
2:1 min. :t(l sec The class ot 100 WOU 

I be meet b\ a large IliaiX'ill. Tl del 

of linishing was as follows: Woodworlh 
'2:i, Slate '21, Maiready '2:i, Irish "2:1. 
Tanner '00, Friend'2:i. Hill '24. Kvers 

'21. Murray 22, W iwort h '2-t. Hall 2t, 

Tow lie '2:!. 



'20 c. Crowe is with the Fitus- 
Blatter Company, New Vork City. 



PLAZA 

Noitliuiiiiitiin . . Mum. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

When- I lie llest 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Are hIiowii. 

Program changed dally **cept Monday 

and Tuesday. 

I ICKDK I'. IIKI.MONT. Manaser. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



AMHERST LAUNDRY 

Has just installed a new machine, the latest "Prosperity BOSOSB Hody Press" for 
shirts. This presses the entire front ami around the neck at one time, saving 
wt ar and giving the shirt a uniform smooth finish. 
Citizens of Amherst cordially invited to visit the Laundry and see it in operation. 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IllC. Northampton, Mass. 



An Optical ■hop wli icli measure* up In the 

liiirlic*t standard <>f modem terries, Smi 

'in rely nn on 1 skill anil tfoixl taste in all 
u|it leal inatteis. 



Our Art |ii-|iait iiieiit Is tllleil with picture! 
suitable for the d ecoration of "fral" hSMSSS, 
or for liirtliilay arid weildlnic itl"». GraSttSS 
cards fur iKirticular people. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October^l920. 



ALUMNI 

'02. — The marraige is announced of 
Dr. Thomas M. Carpenter ami Miss 
Katherinc Kvcly.i Murphy on A OR ail 80 
1020. Their address afle.r December 1 , 
will !».• tflt Corey Si., West Rn.xbury. 
'09.— <). R. Rriggs is with the Charles 
Advertising Serviee New York City, 
specializing in agricultural advertising. 
His home address is Central I'ark, I.. 1., 
New York. 

'09. — 11. W. Turner, Assistant Mana- 
ger of Consuelo Sugar Kstate.Sau Pedro 
de MoeoriH, Dominican Republic, is 
spending a two mouths vacation in the 
United Stales. 

'12. — 1-. K. Pagers! rom has res'gned 
his position as District Sales Manager of 
American Agricultural Chemical Co., 
and has left New York City l« Fair- 
port, X. Y. where he is now engaged 
in the produce and coal business 

'14. — K. Parker has given up Market 
Gardening and become Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Market Gardening at I'ni- 
versity of Ohio. 

'14. — K.lla/.en is head of the fertilizer 

work foi the Eastern Farmers Ex- 
change. 

'15.— P. F. Whit more was married to 
Martha Richardson at Wellesly, Oc- 
tober 14. 

Trj.— Justin llemeiiway who has been 
stationed in Loredo, Texas was married 
October 0th to Dorothy Davies of Texas 
and they sail November 20th for Panama 
where he has been transferred. They 
will pay a Hying visit to the college 
next week. 

'16.— H. C. Darling who went back 
to Baltimore with the Howker Insecti- 
cide Co., after his return from France 
is now District Sales Manager for the 
llowkerCo., in their western teiritory 
with headi|iiaters at Chicago. 

T7.— It. L. llolden has resigned as an 
instructor oi Animal Husbandry at M. 
A. C. to take a position with the Am- 
erican Guernsey Cattle Club, of Peter- 
boro, N. H. 

Ex-'IS.-R. Walt-r Hurlburt has re- 
cently resigned from his position as 
Head Farmer at the Boston State Hos- 
pital to take position of assistant mana- 
ger of two large dairy farms at Brandy 
and Rappahannock, Virginia. 

'19. — H. Carpenter is now Assistant 
Kntouiologist at N. Y. S. U. with head- 
quarters at the State Museum at Albany. 
'19. — H. Baxter is blessed with a baby 
daughter. 

'19. — Mr. and Mrs. Leibman of 11 
Harlem St. Dorchester, announce the 
engagement of their daughter Anna to 
David John Shore of New York City. 
Miss Leibman is a graduate of M. A. C. 
in the class of 1919. 

'20.— F.W. Clarridge is outside Super- 
intendent for J. Hugh Smith, Land- 
scape Architect, Youngstown, Ohio. 

'20. — W. Dewiug is with the (irasselli 
Chemical Company, Boston. 

'20. — Malcolm Chase is a Dairy Chem- 
ist in the Brier Ice-Cream Plant at 
Philadelphia, Penn. 

'20. — Helen Millard has accepted a 
position with the Homiuy Grain Co., of 
Indiana and leaves Gt. Barrington on 
November 1. 

'20. — Hay Smith is running a farm in 
Asbrield for Mr. Bullet. 

'20.— It. W. Woodbury is employed in 
propogation work by the Framing ban 
Nurseries, Framingham. 

'20.— Allan C. Williams is at Delaware 
College as Assistant Professor of An- 
imal Husbandry. He has also been 
appointed by the Federal Board to take 
charge of the Rehabitation work in 
Animal Husbandry at the college. 

'20. — A. F. Frelleck is now instructor 
and coach at the Dalton High School. 



10.- Hairy Herman is employed by 
Child and Co.. «»f Holynke. "Shorty" 
was on i lie campus recently. 

'20. Marion F. Farly Is teaching at 

present at the Lancaster Reformatory 

at Lancaster. Miss Farly will leave for 
the Wesi Nov. 1, where she will be em- 
ployed in Landscape work. 

'SO.— O. MacLeod is acting as coach 
for the local Sign school football team, 
at Geneva, N. Y. When not th.isly 
occupied he busies himself at the New 

York state Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 

'20. -"Cy" Tirell has taken the po- 
sition of instructor of Animal Husbandry 

at M. \. 0. 

uncl-'20. — Fmest Hansen was on the 
Campos last week for a brief visit. Mr. 
Hansen is engaged in landscape work 

at Worcester, 



FRATERNITY DANCES 

The (J. T. V. fraternity held their lirst 
bouse dance last Saturday afternoon 
and evening. Twenty-one couples at- 
tended, and the patronesses wen Mrs 

McCloiid ami Mrs. Deuel of Amhes-i 
Dancing lasted from I until 12 and 
music was furnished by Loomis Orches- 
tra from Northampton. 'The house 
was prettily decorated with ahallowccn 
selling. 

Sixteen couples attended the Lambda 
< hi Alpha house dance held Saturday 
from MO until 10-18 P. H. The patron- 
I were Miss Lease from Ml. Holynke 
and Hh» Sleeper from Smith. Music 
was furnished by Dunbar and Frost 
and refreshments were served at the 
house by a local caterer. The house was 

prettily decorated with erysanthemaaM 

and autumn leaves. 



INTERC0LLEG1ATES 

Keceiit registration figures show that 
Colombia will be the largest educa- 
tional institution in the world with an 
enrollment of 31,000. 

'The honor system has not failed at 
California." says the D*Jif < ■<nif»niimi, 
theollicial organ of the student bo.lv 
at that school. California was the lirst 
university in the countiy to be given 
complete student control. Nearly all 
eases of dishonesty have been reported 
by members of the student body: there 
is no constituted police force, depend- 
ence being placed on the feeling of re- 
sponsibility of the student. Punish- 
ment has been given ranging from ex- 
pulsion, to reprimand by the president., 1 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

BULLETIN REAPPEARS 

Massachusetts Extension News, the 

tbiv publication of the Extension 

Service, makes its re-appearance ibis 
week, after a long absence, in a new 
and attractive form. It is issued under 
direction of Mr. H. M. Lyons of the cor- 
respondence course otlice. and is in- 
tended to carry news and timely inform- 
ation from the college stall and Exten- 
sion Service to all the farm bureaus of 
the state. 

The lirst number consists of 20-odd 
mimeographed sheets in neat paper 
folder, which bears the motto, "A 
Campos as Big as the State." There is 
an interesting editorial section entitled 
'Dreams,' in which the editor points 
out that M. A. C. has stood tor high 
ideals and dreams of a happier country 
life ever since it was founded, and that 
the great conferences on community 
planning and rural welfare held here 
during ihe past few days is to help cel- 
ebtaie M. A. C's semi-centennial of 
service to the people of the slate. Then 
comes ''Snatches of Dreams," a section 
devoted to a lev, of the best thoughts of 
some of the conference speakers. 

Another page gives an account of a 
typical country fair, whu-h the students 
held mi Ihe campus last week. An- 
nouncement is made of a new policy 
in regard to the new publications of the 
experiment station. It is planned to 
bring out a series of popular editions 
of scieutilic bulletins, so that the work 
«>t the station may be more readily 
available to all the people of the state. 
A series of short paragraphs speaks of 
other activities of the Extension Serv- 
ice, and mention is made of a new farm 
account book soon to be ready for dis- 
tribution. A feature of the book is that 
it is arranged as a basis tor liguring in- 
come tax returns, a convenience which 
will surely be appreciated by every one 
who has ever tried to till on t an income 
tax blank. There follow several arti- 
cles by members of the college staff and 
extension workers, describing new and 
worth-while ideas and farm practise. 
It ends with a note from county agents 
about the state. 



Harry A. Ball is instructor of 
Physics in the Qulncy High School, 
Quiney. 



B. 

CATKK1MJ KB 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At FRATKKMT1KBKVKRY NlGHT 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 



We carry » fall line of 

Students' Appliances 

G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS AND CARPETS 

-K. D. MARSH K8TATE- 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



— AT 



The Social Piiion rooms are now used 
on Tuesday and Thursday as the Oym- 
nasiuiu for the Women Students. The 
college can now make use of the Chapel 
Library for study on those days, a priv- 
ilege which one was unable to enjoy be- 
fore this year. 



Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



««i 



tt 



tflDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. I~ M STEBBINS 

Mtddle Street. (Tel.416-W) Hadlej. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

The Collegian, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 



F. P. Rand, Manager 
C. D. Kendall, President 
C. V. Clark, Manager 
Lorenzo Fuller, Manager 

F. A. Gilbert, Manager 
J. 1). Kvers, Manager 
C. W. Bunker, Manager 
L. P. Martin, Editor 

G. W. Kdman, Manager 
M. F. Webster, Editor 
Frederic Howard, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-one Index, C. D. Kendall, Mmager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 
Y. M. C. A. Howard Goff. President 



Telephone 

G. M. Campbell, Ass't Sec. 175-J 
G. M. Campbell, Secretary 175-J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 4°3~ M 

136-R 
280 
280 

8325 

83-'5 
416-M 

280 

8377 
280 

214 

8325 
280 

280 
8314 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



Drugs, Sodas, 

Amherst, 



Cigars, 




-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place fe« 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 3, 1920. 



No. 5 



NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE 
WINS ON ALUMNI FIELD 

Connors and Harvell Big Factors in 

Aggie's First Defeat on 

Alumni Field. 

Playing a hard, clean-cut fMM,M. A . 

differed defeat Saturday M Alumni 

Field at the hands of New llamp- 

- ti ire. Score. Sew Hampshire 0, 

MA. C.,0. 

In the toll of IMS Alumni Field was 
appropriately dedicated when A^ie de- 
haled Colby 20-0. From that date until 
last Saturday M. A. C. had never lost a 
game on Alumni Field. This is a record 
to he proud of and, although broken, it 
will ever retain the evidence of many 
clean-cut, hard-fought hatiles in which 
such men as Curran. Darling Weeks, 
Pond, Dunn. Palmer, an J the Grayson 
brothers have made their names in 
Annie history. 

M. A. 0, entered the name last Satur- 
day with a record of four straight vic- 
tories and, although they fought hard 
for a tif tli victory, the strong New 
Hampshire eleven one more proved an 
Aggie jinx. Three times (apt. Poole 
hail his men within the ten yard line 
on first down but each time New Hamp- 
shire held like a stonewall and gained 
the ball on downs. Harvell. the visi- 
tors big center, was a tower of strength 
in the line, and repeatedly broke 
through to break up an Aggie combina- 
tion. It is almost useless to try and 



OUR OPPONENTS SCORES 

LAST SATURDAY 



Dartmouth 
Tl'FTS 

Union 

RHODE ISLAM) 

Boston College 
BPRINGF1KLD 



M 

7 

7 
7 

12 




WORLD AGGIE NIGHT A 

SUCCESS IN MANY CITIES 



CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 
STROLLS AWAY FROM W. P. I. 




Aggie Cinder Men Chalk Up First 
Victory of the Season. 

Captain Slate's wing-footed stpiad of 
cross-country men strolled away from 
Worcester "Tech's confident team at Ihe 
rate of 24 to HI in the first race of the 
season at Worcester Saturday. The 
Aggie team composed o» Slate Wood- 
worth, Kvers. West, Irish, and Mae- 
< ready left the campus Saturday morn- 
ing arriving at Worcester too late to 
have an opportunity to examine the 
course. 

The live ami one-quarter mile course 
which was mostly over smooth ground 
proved easy in comparison with the 
courses which the M. A. (J. team has 
been running in practice; the three 
long hills proving more exhausting to 
the Worcester men than to the visitors. 

It was Aggie's race from the start al- 
though the leaders were fairly well 
bunched until the last mile. After the 
first mile Slate and Woodworth of II. 
A. C. and Hoar, Marston, and .Johnson 
[Continued on page 2 1 



Large Groups Present in Boston, Am- 
herst, New York, and Cleveland. 

The second Aggie World Night in Ihe 
history of the college was held Friday 
night, Oct. 2K, all over the country and 
in every place where any Aggie alumni 
could have a "get-to-gel her." The lirst 
World Aggie Night was held over a 
year ago tot Ihe purpose of uniting the 
alumni in an effort to raise money for 
the proposed Memorial Building. This 
year, with the Memorial Building well 
on its way toward completion. President 
Butlerlicld decided that il was of Ihe 
utmost importance to acquaint the 
alumni with Ihe needs of the college, 
especially in the matter of new build- 
ings. 

The largest meeting of the evening 
[Continued on pave 41 

ROISTER DOISTERS LAY 

PLANS FOR THE YEAR 



JAMES C. GREENOUGH 

IS HONORED GUEST 



C. (J. Mackintosh '21 

v» II..-..- |. laying at center this season has been 
the best of his career. 

the value of •'Dutch'' Connor* to 
New Hampshire eleven. Through' 
ottf the entire game he sent long spiral 
its to the side lines for almost cou- 
nt gains of fifteen and twenty yards 
for his team. He was called upon to 
b the ball in every three or four 
boi and usually managed to gain 
»• his teammates were held for 
■ I. Near the close of the first period 
tan 45 yards to the Aggie 25 yard 
line and, ashort time after, scored three 
[Continuedon pace 81 



SLATE TO CAPTAIN 

VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY 

Meeting after lunch, just before their 
victorious chase with Worcester Tech. 
the Cross Country Team elected Ceorge 
Slate '21 as their captain. 

(.raduating from Beriiarilston High 
in 11*1*7 with no track experience, Slate 
started his track work at M. A.C.in 
the spring of his Sophomore year, and 
has been an active member of every 
Cros-- country and Spring Track team 
since that lime. 

Last Spring, Slate won his "M" at the 
Triangular meet at Burlington with 
live points, snatching second in a fast 
mile, and third in the two-mile against 
excellent competition. For the first 
place captured at Worcester. Saturday. 
Slate will undoubtedly be awarded the 
Cross Country "M ". 

Qeorgf slate is a member of the 
Alpha Camma Rho fraternity, a popu- 
lar man on the Campus, and one of 
I Aggie's track leaders, both on the cin- 
ders and on hill and dale. 



Tscharner Watkins Elected Vice- 
Presdent. 

Plans for the biggest year ever wen 
laid at the bOOqUOl Of the Iloister-Dois- 
ter Dramatic Association at Draper 
Hall, Friday evening, Oct. 20. Prof. 
Frank P. Kami, representing Ihe Non- 
Alhlctic Board of the Faculty, was the 
guest of the Society. Tscharner ('.. Wat- 
kins '21, of Midlothian, Va.. waseleciccl 

Vice-President to fill 'In ly existing 

vacancy. The other officers are Jona- 
than II. Smith, of Roslindalc, President, 
and Ceorge W. Kdman, of Orange, Sec- 
retary. 

It was decided to give Ihe annua) 
student vaudeville show in December, 
each Iraleriiily on I he campus being 
given an opportunity to present a short 
sketch. 

A new departure was suggested in 
the form of an "Aggie Show" to be 
given during Ihe latter part of January, 
in which stunts will be given by the 
Faculty , the four classes, Co-eds, Two- 
reaf students, and the Clerical Staff. 

For the Prom show il was decided to 
put on a musical comedy written by 
Jack" Smith. The title is "Rubbish, " 
the scenes are laid in the Connecticut 
Valley and Ihe Fiji Islands, the home 
of the ukelele and the hula maiden. 
The plot is entirely original and the 
dialog exceedingly clever. It is possi- 
ble that a few performances may be 
given on the road after the Prom show. 
The outlook for the coming year is 
exceedingly bright. The Society was 
fortunate is losing very few menc 
by graduation and in addition much 
promising new material is available. 
With the customary enthusiastic sup- 
port of the student body, the Roister 
Doisters are sure to maintain a splendid 
reputation for the college and them- 
selves. 



Former M. A. C. President Tendered 
Luncheon at Draper Hall. 

James (airiitheis Creeiiough, Presi- 
dent of M. A. C. from 1HHH-1KH0, and a 
man now M years of age, who ha 

alwayi booa letoreatod la any affair 

concerning the wcllarc of Aggie, was 
the honored guest al a luncheon ten- 
dered him al Draper Hall on Natunla.v . 
Oct. HO. 

There were present at Ihe luncheon 
twenty people, including several of 
those mosl closely associated with Mr. 
Oicciioiigh dining bis term of otlice, 
several ol the older ollicers of the col- 
lege, and lepiociitalivcs Of Adclphia. 
Tins event was pari of the semi centen- 
nial celebration of Ihe college, and 
following close upon World Aggie 
night dinners, held Ihe nighl hi fore, 
wherever a group of Aggie alumni 

could get together. Ibis lunch was 

unioiie aaaOBfl IfcaaO gatherings, in thai 
aliuoKt everyone present could recall 
events in the development of the col- 
lege reaching back ovei marly Un- 
complete span of its hisloiv 

liolh Dr Joseph H. IJmlsey, '88, and 
Dr. II. J. Wheeler, "Kl, were members 
ol the class that graduated the year of 
Oreeiiough's inauguration to I lie lead- 
ership of M. A C. They were the two 
original employees of the Fxperimeiil 
Station. Dr. Hrooks of the class of '75, 
who directed the Fxpeiimenl Station 
work at M. A. C. f<>r almost thirty 
years, studied under (.oessmann, the 
founder of agricultural chemistry in 
America. Miss Helena (.oessmann, 
daughter of the chemist . and Dean K. 
M. Lewis were also guests al this re- 
union. 0. A.Oleaaoa and J. J. Creen- 
ough of Deerfield, brother of ex-Presi 

deiil t.ree lgh, S. BL I'arker, lead.i 

in county agent work, and Rev. H.J. 
While, H7, now engaged in Ihe ministry 
al Hartford, < ( , nn., and a veteran foot- 
ball man were among those present. 

Dr. Chattel Wellington, '7H, who has 
maintained his contact wilh the college 
as student and teacher almost since its 
inception, had stories of Ihe famous 
"Faculty Of Four": William (J.Clark, 
first President and scientist trained 
under Leuis Agassi/., before he em- 
barked la scientific education; Henry 
II. Coodell, of Amherst College, tori 
Slockbridge, from Old lladley, whose 
name runs through the annals of two 
generations of Aggie life, and BbOBOaOf 
Snell.also an Amherst College leado-i. 
He remembered the days when Aggie 
students were marched I wo by two 
down Pleasant street on Sundays to 
take their religious exercises in tin- 
gallery of Amherst College Chapel. In 
•hose early days Amherst College pro- 
fessors helped the young and much 
misunderstood agricultural college l.v 
giving Iheir lectures to Aggie students 
as well as to their classes in the older 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 3, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 3, 1920. 



classical college. 

Mr. Tiu-kerman and Mr. lirorieur, 
Principal of WeHtfield Norma] School, 
also Hpoke. The talks were mostly 
reminiscences. (ireenouuh spoke of 
the hardships in college in those days, 
of the many efforts to obtain new build- 
ings, of the fact that the trustees were 
on the outs with the Alumni, and of his 
success in obtaining the stone chapel 
which is now the library, In addition 
to this, North and South Colleges were 
built during his administration, while 
in 1884 he reported that the chemistry 
Laboratory was no longer usable and 
that a new one should be built. South 
College burned while he was here, 
catching lire from an exploding lamp in 
an incubator run by an ambitious poul- 
try student , and (lining this conllagra- 
tion, ex-President Creenough himself 
rescued the old shell which is now in 
the trophy room of North College. 

These men were not only the pioneers 
but were the leaders through a long 
period of Aggie history. From the 
foundations built by them, the Aggie 
of today may he said to have been 
moulded. 



the question was laid on the table till 
the next meeting. It was decided to 
have the football team elect its own 
manager. There being no other bus- 
iness, the meeting adjourned. 



MANDOLIN CLUB COMMENCES 
WORK FOR THE SEASON 



FRESHMEN IN 7-7 TIE 

WITH DRURY HIGH SCHOOL 

Only extremely hard luck prevented 
the M. A. C. Freshmen from defeating 
North Adams High, last Saturday, in a 
football game which resulted in a 7-7 
tie. 

The yearlings made their only touch- 
down in the first quarter, after they 
had held their opponents for downs and 
marched straight down the held, using 
line plays. 

In the second period, a North Adams 
kick was blocked behind the line and 
an Aggie man fell on the ball. Through 
some mistake, the referee refused to 
give Ihe Freshmen the touchdown, and 
called the ball "dead." 

North Adams kept the Freshmen 
guessing by a fast end-around play. In 
the third quarter this netted the up 
state lads a touchdown, the ball being 
carried for twenty yards around right 
end. 

The tinal bit of hard luck came at the 

last, when the Freshmeu carried the 

ball over, only to find that linesman 

Chapman had broken his whistle, and 

had been unable to announce the end 

of playing time before the play started. 

Not much overhead work was tried. 

although North Adams worked one 

pretty forward. M. A. C. did not have 

to kick once during the entire game, 

and North Adams only a few times. 

The two teams were well matched la 

the line, but Aggie was a bit heavier in 

the backtield. 

Capt. Ferranti starred for the Fresh- 
men, lie made several long runs, and 
used excellent judgment in choosing 
plays. About one-third of the year- 



Many More Men Needed. 
The Mandolin Club has started out 
the season with two practice periods 
a week and snappy practice for those 
who are out. As a good, large club, 
however, it is handicapped by a lack of 
material from the upper classes. There 
is a feeling among the present mem- 
bers now that there are fellows in col- 
lege who could be out for the club but 
who are not. There are 1H men out in 
all now, though there should be twenty- 
five for a normal season. Under the 
circumstances, however, for a small 
club with lots of pep its outlook is fairly 
optimistic. The old stand-by's Labro- 
vitz, Waugh, Sears, Wendell, Vinten, 
Towne and Fuller are out strong, and|a 
refreshing outlook for next year is 
shown by the comparatively large num- 
ber of Freshmen who are out for prac- 
tice now but who, unfortunately, will 
not be able to play until after Christ- 
mas. For the Sophomores, Faneuf and 
Perry are doing good work. The Fresh- 
men out are Hlanchard, Lamb, Loring, 
Woodworth and Toby. 

As for the schedule, the regular Bos- 
ton trip will be made at Christmas time 
and the Greenfield and Hadley trips are 
unite certain. Practice is being held in 
Stockbridge llall twice a week. Monday 
after the fraternity meetings and Wed- 
nesday after seven. 




If you were to vote for the most satisfactory clothing store in Northampton 
what points would you consider! 1 How about a large stock with wide range 
in color, pattern, models and sizes ? How about such well known makes as 

Hart Schattner and Marx, and Society Brand Clothes? 

When in Hamp give us a call. We will give you uniform courtesy and 

money back if not satisfied. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

144 Main Street, Northampton 



CUTLER 



N & 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Candy Shop 



Soda Parlor 



BECKM AN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Maaaaohuaoita 



CROSS COUNTRY 

[Continued from page ll 



Of YV. P. I. drew ahead of the rest and 
ran fairly well together until the last 
mile when Slate and Woodworth easily 
took the lead and were never threat- 
ened, t'ajitain Slate finished in a won- 
derful burst of speed around the track 
leading his team-mate, Woodworth by 
about fifty yards. Johnson, Marston, 
and Hoar of Worcester were the next to 
tinish being closely followed by the 
three remaining Aggie men,MacCready, 
Rollins and Ir'sh. The time for the 
five and one-quarter miles was 30 
minutes, 20 seconds. As this was the 
first race of the season Coach Dickin- 
son feels sure that the present team 
will be the strongest for several years. 
Several of the men in Saturday's race 
will be in much better trim in another 
week ; Tanner who is at present ineligi- 
ble and Friend who is out temporarily 
with an injured foot will both be men 
to be reckoned with before the season 
is over. 

Next week the team meets the strong 
New Hampshire squad on the M. A. C. 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



-FOR 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



lings have been made ineligible for course and a lively race is promised. 



future contests because of failure in 
studies. Coach Jakeman used the fol- 
lowing line-up Forges le ; Salmon It; 
Staebner lg ; Wilhelm c; Myrick and 
Barker rg; Noyes rt ; Chase re; Lowell 
and Bart let t Ihh; Williams fb; Fer- 
ranti rhh ; Uilskie <jh. 



FREHMAN CLASS MEETING 

A Freshman class meeting was held 
Tuesday evening October 29, in Clark 
Hall, to hear the report of a committee 
nominated to draw up a constitution 
for the tlass. After some discussion, 
it was decided that a quorum to adopt 
the constitution should consist of two 
thirds of the class. The roll was called, 
and there not being a quorum present, 



New Hampshire is without her record 
bealer,Gordon Nightingale,but she still 
has a strong aggregation in Hubbard, 
Thompson, Weston and Faine. With 
the advantage of running on its home 
course and with the support of the 
student body, Captain Slate's team 
should come through with another 
victory. 

Seedlings of some new varieties of 
carnations, the results of exercises in 
hybridizing by the Floriculture class 
of last spring, are beginning to blossom 
and several of them are showing up re- 
markably well. At least three of them 
give promise of making good commer- 
cial varieties. The especially promis- 
ing ones are a dark red, N, a pale 
pink, 10-2, and a deep salmon-pink, 2-6. 




sn sa si 

iniiiiBiil!!"'" 



mmJf m*** 

TRADE 




MARfC 



^liuiiiiiii 



ANY tobacco — every tobacco — tastes better in a W D C 
i. Pipe. Our own specially seasoned and carefully selected 
French briar makes it so. Add to this the supercraftsman- 
ship of the Demuth workers, and you'll not wonder that we 
claim pre-eminence in the quality of our pipes. Ask any 
good dealer. 

W%0EM OTW jRCO^N I w york 

W O R LO's' LA RGES T'MVVe R*S»O^FI N E PIPES 



TWO-YEAR TEAM NO MATCH 

FOR SUFFIELD ELEVEN 

Em" Grayson's Team Makes its 
Only Tally in Second Quarter. 
Final Score 20-7. 

\ hard, well-fought game at SuHield, 
til Saturday, terminated with a score 
ol 20-7 against the two-year varsity. A 
husky rival had been e\pe«ted in the 
Mitlield team which has heen cleaning 
up all around this tall. The two-year 
team, however, showed Improvement 

over its playing of last week- it showed 
more light and better tackling. Nuf- 
lield had to take time out and use sub- 
stitutes again and again. A square 
deal was given the visiling team by 
.uaches and students. 

Kahcock was the star player for Mit- 
luld. Fickard, quarter-hack and cap- 
lain for the two-year team, lm\ve\ 11 , 
>howed up equally well with Bftbcock, 
making big yains. ami heing stopped 
only I'.v Halicock himsell. (lerard pla\ ed 
1 Rood game, burke received a pain- 
lully twisted ankle in the last quarter, 
and had to leave the game. Caldwell 
and Anderson of Sutlield also had to 
re ihe game hecause of injuries. The 
\Mi-vear team made twice as many first 
downs as SuHield but were unable to 
push the ball over as a result ol penal 
ties. On the whole the two -year learn 
may be said to be improving, and looks 
forward to ■ ■■eoeeafvl game with 

1 tuning next Saturday at Ashbuinham, 
ind with the Connectiiut Aggie sec- 
onds here the following week. 

the first quarter started in with the 
wo-vear kicking to Sutlield. The lat- 
<i made a first down ami punted. The 
iwo-years took the ball and rushed it' 
Irel down after lirst down, from the :'.<> 
raid line. Frequent penalties, how 
1 wr. prevented scoring. At the end of 
he lirst quarter, Fickard broke away 
mil went 10 yards, but a confusion re- 
sulted, due to the timer blowing his 
whistle and the play was stopped, 
:. venting a score. 

The second quarter began wilh two 

downs for the two-year, followed 

ij a forward pOM to OMIld who made 

:i touchdown, scoring the only point for 

||, A, C. Fickard kicked the goal. 

The ball then stayed p ra c t i c a l ly 

in the center of the field, the Suttiehl 

players trying line bucks and end runs 

with very little result until toward the 

end they made a touchdown and kicked 

he goal, thus tying the score. 

The two-years received the kick-off in 

second half. The Sutlield bunch 

uiie back hard. After an exchange of 

its, Wiggin fumbled and Sutlield re- 

ivered <>n the two-year four-yard line. 

M plays'took it over. They missed 

goal. The two-years received the 

kofl and made a couple of first 

ns. Then after an exchange of 

- I'.abcock got the ball and ran for 

■ u< ■hdown. He kicked the goal, 

king the score 20 to 7. The two- 

1 failed to do any more scoring, 

i^h the ball was in the opponent's 

lory all the time. Repeated penal- 

kept the two-year from scoring. 

line-up was as follows: 







1 IKM». 


M. A. < . 






>-.\e 


re, Keating 






id worth, It 


rt, Boelling 






sett, lg 


rg. (lark 






ney c 


c, Raymond 






l si in , rg 


le, Burnett 






• .111. rt 


It, Betteriy 






ens, re 


le, Gerard 






>ck, qh 


,|b, Richardson 






iwcll, lhb 


rhb, Fickard 


1 




■■ 1 "hb 


lhb. Wiggin 






, fb 


lb, Steele 



Score- -Sutlield JO, M. A. C. 7. Touch- 
downs- Babcook 9, Gerard 1. Goals 

from touchdowns — Rabcock 2, Wiggin. 

Referee— Zelgler, Umpire— B. Fa hi. 

Substitutes -M. A. ('.: (ieiccondi for 
Keating, Merwin for Clark, Wood for 
Meiwin, Rurke for Rurnelt, Harnett for 
for Rurke, Maggi fortierard, Gerald for 
Maggi. Time— 18 and 12 mill, periods. 

EX-PRESIDENT TAFT TO 

SPEAK TO STUDENTS SUNDAY 

Aggie Very Fortunate in Obtaining the 
Presence of Great American. 

Sunday Chapel Commences next Sun 
da] morning, with Kx-1'resident William 
Howard Taft as the speaker. Not much 
need be said hereof the good or bad 
qualities Of Mr. Taft ; we can surely ex- 
pect a worth while hismskh from him. 

lion. William Howard Taft is one of 
the foremost men In American national 

affairs today. Bora Id Cincinnati, Ohio, 

in 1887, he attended school there ami 
graduated from Vale in ln~x as salufa- 

t or! an of his class. He then studied 

law and was admitted to the Ohio bar. 

Previous to his presidency, Mr. Tal 1 
hel<l various important judicial and ad 
ministraii\c positions. Me started his 
career as a lawyer and legal newspaper 
reporter in Cincinnati, Ohio. He then 
held several minor public ofBoM, which 
led up to his appointment, in 18BS 
judge of the Ohio Supeiior court, and 
later to (he lit h 1'. S. t'ircuit, where he 
look a notable stand against boycotts 
and strik 

From 1700 to 1001 Mr. Taft did won- 
derful work as Coventor of the Phil- 
ippine Islands, and won the hearty 
good will of the Filipinos towards the 

United States. Returning to thia coun- 
try, be was fiecruearj oi War, 1004. n«w, 

in which olliee he performed siveral 
difficult missions with great tacl and 
diplomatic ability. In L806, after visit- 
ing tuba and Ihe Philippines, he went 
to Japan and China, where he did 
much to create good feeling wilh the 
United states. 

Although his great ambition la> in 
the Superior Court, by the influence of 
his brother and President Roosevelt 
Mr. Taft was nominated for the presi- 
dency and elected in 1!*0)S. During his 

terra of office, be loyally supported his 

cabinet officers, Whom he chose with- 
out party lines. He served t he country 
well for four > ears, and then left the 
presidential chair in favor of Woodiow 
Wilson. 

Since his presidency, he has returned 
Id Vale College as Kent Professor of 
Law there. He served on the National 
War Labor Confere:.ce board, and is 
now President of Ihe League to Enforce 
Peace. He has taken a definite stand 
on all matters of national concern, and 
bis opinion and judgment is looked up 
to by the whole nation. The faculty 
has been very fortunate la securing Mr. 
Taft to come here to speak to us. and it 
is hoped that the whole college will 
show its appreciation of him next 
Sunday. 

Aggie Economic Club Meeting. 
The Agricultural Economies Club 
bold a meeting October 27 in the Social 
Union Rooms. About fifteen members 

were present, Prof. Canee presiding. 

In the course of the meeting each 
man was called upon to give a short re- 
sume of his work last summer. Every- 
one had something iotereeting to say, 
but Douglas '21 was especially good 
with his tales of "cow punching" on a 
western ranch. Afterwards, refresh 
ments were served. The date of the 
next meeting will he announced later. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 



Nash Block 



COME ON FELLOWS 

i'ii u — 

I > * 1 1 1 o «_» ** ! 

Odd Fellows' Hall. Every Saturday Nirfht. 
JERRY'S JAZZ BAND 



St 1 OUR LINK OK 



Fine Groceries 
Candies* and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



■•uiluiiii ISM 

Stbphkn Lane Folqkh. (Me 

MANITieillKINd JKWHI.KKN 

180 HHOAUWAY, NEW YOKK 

OL.VTI1 AND OOI..I.iK<lK 

PINH AND KINliM * 
SOLD, mi.TIII AND KMClNZa MSDALS 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hose for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A good 
assortment of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



THE 



Northampton, Mass. 



The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE MILLKTT JEWELRY STORE 



Colics* Jewelry « nil Links. Soft Collar l'lns. 
Dress Hull Sets. Violin. Itmijo, Mandolin Strings 

Fine Watch Repairing, alxo Broken Lenses 

Keiilart'd 1'ioiiuitly. 

32 Main Street. Amherst. Mass. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



All good fertilizers make crops grow. 

HIGGINS' MAKES THEM GROW BEST 

(We don't advertise, we're just telling you). 

HIGGINS 07 



RUSSELL '16 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



!*•»«©'«* 



hoe Store 

SPECIAL 



$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 



MORANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 

Manufacturers institution Cooking Apparatus 



of 



86 WASHINGTON »T. 



BOSTON 



£&rptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No I, Cook Place, Amherst, Mast. 



The M— achuaette Collegian, Wednesday, November 3, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 3, 192*. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



I.acrfm k. 1'. Maktin -21. KdUor-tn-Chtef 

Korkkt I.. JOW "21 Managing Editor 

A8BOCIATK KOITOKS. 

OlOROK W. Kl>MAN "21 

Kknnkth A. Hahnaud *■ 
Htani.kv W. Uh.-mi.kv <n 

1'Al I. L. 1(1 UNFIT -22 

tloliAlM W. Hl-KlMi "22 

ItKI.MXU P. JACKSON '22 

John M. Whit n k.k "2:t 

L. 11. AHUINTil"^ '-'S 



HUBINEK8 DkI'AKTMK.NT. 
Hbrrkbt U Quick '21. Business Manager 

Kvkkktt r. Pukstun '21 AdvertiainK Manager 
OllUH A. Hi " K IS < -ireulatlon HWW 

MVHON (J. MlliHAY "22 

lloi.UKN WlllTTAKKK "23 

OWKN K. KoMIOM "28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 110.1. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Two-Y«ar. 
In an article headed "Two-Year" 
which appeared in the last issue of the 
Com. koi \x, statement* were made 
which have since been proven to be un- 
true. The editor-in-chief wishes to 
retract these statements on the basis 
of misinformation. The sarcastic tone 
Of the article would have been justiticd 
if the facts, as presented to the writer, 
had been true. The Com.kwian can 
wish tot nothing b«l the most cordial 
relations between the two-year and four- 
year students. It is sincerely sorry for 
whatever -'hard" feelings may have 
been caused by the appearance of this 

article. 

First, the object was not to abolish 
chapel, but to change the days in order 
to give the two classes of the Two Year 
Course an opportunity to organize. 

It is necessary for so large a hotly of 
students to organic*. I'nder the pres- 
ent arrangement «>f chapels and 
assemblies there is no method possible 
for this. It was therefore suggested 
that by changing chapel mornings, 
this matter might be remedied. Conse- 
quently, the matter was discussed and 
it was decided that the extremely short 
time thus gained.no where near counter- 
balanced the loss in fellowship, unity, 
and the intangible but vital "College 
Spirit", thus incurred. Therefore, the 
matter was dropped. The proposed 
petition for the abolishment of a re- 
quited course eventually vanished in 
the air, as do many similar student 
agitations. 

COMMUNICATION 

To TBI Kimtoi: O* tiik Coi.i.m.ia.n. 

In the student forum last Wednesday 
a possible inauguration of a credit sys- 
tem in student activities was discussed. 
Several points were brought up in tavor 
of this system which, although possible, 
do not seem feasible. It is a recognized 
fact that all societies and organized 
bodies have leaders who are born and 
not made, ami have members who are 
best suited to carry on that particular 
line of work. If these men are to be 
kept out of the work in which they can 



do good, just because they are also do- 
ing something else, it is going to break 
down the leadership and the efficiency 
of each separate hotly. 

The t|ueslion of scholarship has l.een 
brought up. When a man becomes an 
upperclassnien in college, he, in most 
cases, is of his own mind enough to 
know just how much work he can or 
cannot do. The man who attains to l'hi 
Kappa Phi iB not always the man who is 
tleaf tt> student activities. Last year 
the Phi Kappa Phi men at If. A. C. in- 
cluded the editor of the Coi.i.ioian. 
editor of the Index, track captain, l>as- 
ketball captain, president of Adelphia, 
Senior president, four or live "M" men, 
;vnd a number of men who look part in 
dramatics, musicals and socials. Al- 
though not a complete list this helps to 
show that college men as a rule do not 
try to handle more work than they are 
capable of attending to. 

As for affixing a definite standing to 
each activity it should he home in mind 
that the president of the Senate is a 
tery high office in college but it takes 
only a comparatively small amount of 
time each week for the president to 
attend to his duties: whereas a mem- 
ber of the Coi.i.koi \x board or Index, 
hoard although receiving less credit, 
lias to spend a great deal more time on 
his work. This is also true in compar- 
ing athletics and non-athletics. 

The last point, of the credit system's 
allowing more men to participate in ac- 
tivities, brings up again the question of 
whether you want a weak organization 
composed of untrained and incapable 
men. If a man has the power of lead- 
ership so that he can lead two or three 
bodies and at the same time do well 
in his studies, why in the world should 
he be kept down? To give the other 
fellow a chance you. say. This is a dem- 
ocratic college and each man has a 
fair chance to demonstrate his ability. 
If he is found wanting it is a worldwide 
custom to give the better man the posi- 
tion As one prominent businessman 
said. A man in order to be a good exec- 
utive must not only be able to execute 
but he must also be able to conceive. 
Men of such a nature are the men who 
form the leadership of a strong organ- 
ization and they are not found at every 

turn. 

ii. w. s. 



Professor Hasbrouck spoke on the col- 
lege enrollment. At present we are 
just holding our own as regards new 
regular men, but there has been an in- 
creased enrollment in the short courses. 
Scholastic standing among the lower 
classes has been lowered as a result of 
the present rushing rules, and in conse- 
quence a new rushing system must be 
adopted without delay. 

Reports are fast coming in of meet- 
ings held Saturday night. Thirty men 
gathered in each of the cities of Phila- 
delphia, New Haven and Springlield. 
In New York state meetings were hold 
in New York, Buffalo and Ithaca, at 
at which a total of 63 men were present. 
At Pittslield there were nine men, and 
at Cleveland there were 12 who gath- 
ered to foster the old Aggie spirit. 
Four '20 men, Luce, Cole , Pree, ami 
Rums were unable to attend the meet- 
ing in Seattle and BO bad a little meet- 
ing of their own at Wanachee, Wash. 
Twenty men gathered at Hotel Ray- 
mond in Fitchhurg. Prof, bobbins 
and Dr. Peters '81 were both present. 



Not to be outdone by anyone else, Guy 
Mcl.eod 10 and Carry PhippH '19 held a 
social evening of their own at Geneva, 
N. V., over a supper of Campbell's 
soup, etc. They talked over old times, 
ami Aggie songs were rendered to the 
accompaniment of a mouth organ anil a 
ukelele. 

All reports which have been received 
tell of the great time that everyone bad 
al the meetings and there seems to be a 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men tanulit to lead by uuickeBt methods. 
InQuirlem ml Mill* Studio, 

V. () . liiilldlntf. 1'taone 466-R 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC lJUX'K, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

— Popular with M. A.C. Men — 

Next Assembly, FRIDAY, Nov. 5, 8-00 p. m. 

Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Worthington 



UNITY CHURCH 

j HENRY G. IVES, Minister 

Invites you to its home life. 

Come and get acquainted. 

No creedal tests. 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

[Continued from pasre 1] 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real bargains in 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes. 
You can't afford to ruiss this BALE! 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. On your way up town. 



SUNDAY PREACHING SERVICE, 
10-45 A. M. 

SONG AND PICTURE SERVICE, 
7-30 P. M. 



was held in Boston, where numerous 
important questions were decided upon 
and President Butterfield was the main 
speaker. Besides the matter of build- 
ing, President Butterfield called atten- 
tion to the fact that unless financial aid, 
in the way of increased salaries soon 
makes its appearance, the college will 
be unable to retain its present staff of 
finely trained and proflicient professors. 
It is an unfortunate fact that Massa- 
chusetts is not paying as much for her 
professors as the County Farm Bureaus 
are paying. Among the matters of bus- 
iness taken up, it was decided to reor- 
ganize the Boston Alumni Club, and a 
drive for 500 new members will be in- 
stituted at once. II. W. Dana '89 was 
elected the new president of the Asso- 
ciate Alumni, and L. W. Ross '17 secre- 
tary. Five co-eds also met in Boston 
and formed an Associate Alumna-, sub- 
sidiary to the present Association. It 
was further agreed that all would go in 
mass to the Tufts game. 

In Amherst 85 alumni were present, 
prominent among whom were A. J. 
Morse "°4, E. B. Smeatl of (ireenlield, 
Dr. Fred Tuckerman and Dr. ti. II. 
Chapman '07 who acted as toastmaster. 




"The long and short of it is" — 
we never fail to make good. 

So you can't go wrong if your 
outfit's an R. P. 

The best of everything college men wear 

Rogers Pket Company 







Broadway 
at 13th St. 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 



Broadway 
at 34th St. 



Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave 

at Warren at 41st St 

NEW YOUK CITY 



61 LAVAL 

Cream 

SEPARATORS 

The best of all 
dairy investments. 
Save $15 to $20 
per cow every year. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

IBS Bromttwmy, Mow York 

29 E. MmdlmonSt. , Chicago 

50,000 BRANCHES AND LOCAL 
AGENCIES THE WORLD OVER 



MAJir^&i On Dit, On Bit 



mwm 




£T O many customers hove praised our merchandise that there must be an assunip. 
—J (ion of truth in it; on the recognized principle that they who are accused off 
much, must be guilty of something. 

Quality is Economy 



general feeling that another mooting 
should be held in March and that an 
extensive drive will be undertaken to 
goi all the alumni hack to M. A. ('. for 
Commencement in June. 



EXTRACTS FROM "BURLING- 
TON FREE PRESS AND TIMES" 

Fine College Spirit .... not only are 
the members of the Massachusetts team 
to be congratulated on their spirit and 
sportsmanship, but the hundred or 



more students who travelled from Ani- 
heist to HurliiiL'ton to support iheir 
learn are to lie congratulated. One in- 
teresling group was made up of eo-eds. 
Although peeved at missing two loitih- 
tlowns Bade l»y their team they took it 
like sports and let loose all the pent up 
enthusiasm of their fifteen hour ride. 
Looking at them and realizing the Hip 
which they had endured tor the sake of 
the team one would scarcely wonder at 
tlie pep anil liyht displayed l»y 1 lii- 
Aggies. 



Again . . . . M. A.C. is a real football 
aggregatloa from one end of the line to 
the other anil then through to the l»ack- 
lield. The I'. V. M. line could not 
master the Aggie line, working with 
machine-like precision. It is the best 
team that has played on Centennial 
Field this year. It is a pleasure to watch 
them. 



'17. — C. F. (/nimby is acting as Farm 
Superintendent at the Norfolk County 
Agricultural Shool, YValpolc, Mass. 




How Large is an Atom? 



ATOMS are so infinitesimal that to be seen under the most power - 
t ful microscope one hundred million must be grouped. The atom 
used to be the smallest indivisible unit of matter. When the X-Rays 
and radium were discovered physicists found that they were dealing 
with smaller things than atoms — with particles they call "electrons." 

Atoms arc built up of electrons, just as the solar system is built up 
of sun and planets. Magnify the hydrogen atom, says Sir Oliver 
Lodge, to the size of a cathedral, and an electron, in comparison, will 
be no bigger than a bird-shot. 

Not much substantial progress can be made in chemical and elec- 
trical industries unless the action of electrons is studied. For that 
reason the chemists and physicists in the Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company are as much concerned with the very con- 
stitution of matter as they are with the development of new inven- 
tions. They use the X-Ray tube as if it were a machin«-gun; for by 
its means electrons are shot at targets in new ways so as to reveal more 
about the structure of matter. 

As the result of such experiments, the X-Ray tube has been greatly 
improved and the vacuum tube, now so indispensable in radio com- 
munication, has been developed into a kind of trigger device for guid- 
ing electrons by radio waves. 

Years may thus be spent in what seems to be merely a purely 
"theoretical" investigation. Yet nothing is so practical as a good 
theory. The whole structure of modern mechanical engineering is 
reared on Newton's laws of gravitation and motion — theories stated 
in the form of immutable propositions. 

In the past the theories that resulted from purely scientific re- 
search usually came from the university laboratories, whereupon the 
industries applied them. The Research Laboratories of the General 
Electric Company conceive it as part of their task to explore the un- 
known in the same spirit, even though there may be no immediate 
commercial goal in view. Sooner or later the world profits by such 
research in pure science. Wireless communication, for example, was 
accomplished largely as the result of Herz's brilliant series of purely 
scientific experiments demonstrating the existence of wireless waves. 



General 

Com! 



General Office 




Electric 

ftfXy Schenectady, N.Y. 



14.— M. D. Cainphell is instructor of 
Field Crops and Animal Husbandry 
at I he Norfolk County Agricultural 
School, Walpole. Mass. 



M. Novick & A. Warren 



MEN'S TAILORS 



SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Also Cleaning. Pressing, Dyeing and Repairing 

— Work done while you wait — 
Work called for and delivered 

Dress Suits for Rent 



S. S. HYDE 

J » ■%■*-«» !»■• oikI QgMltilOMI 
IS Pleasant Street 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing 

Pronptly and Skilfully Done 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILK YOU WAIT 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst ■ . Man* 






fl^<yancsr 



JP ^^i7offnJ7fA'acun. .vy. 



s 

H 
E 
SHEPARO 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 3, 1920. 



HAVE YOU DISCOVERED 

That it is more convenient to drop into the AGGIE INN than to go down town? 

How nice Mrs. Reddy's pies and cakes taste? 

That we welcome helpful suggestions in order thatwe may be of more service to you? 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

WkDNKSI.AV, NoVKMliKU '*■ 

7-(M) P m.- Mandolin Club Rehearsal. 

Btoekbrtdg* Hall, Boob 114. 

7-80 i>. M— Aniniiil llushandry Clob 
Ifeetlag, Btoekbridga Hail. 

Till -IISDAY, NoVKMHKU 4. 

7-00 P. m. ■ BuikI Kelieareal, Social 

I'nioM Uuoins. 
7;;o ,. M __(;i ee <'luh Rehearsal, Uoom 

114, Stoekbridga Rail. 

FltlDAV, NoVKMHKK 4. 

7-40 \. M — Chapel. 

S \n iti.w. No\ iMin.i: «. 
MO p M -Football, M.A.C. ts. Bkode 
Island State Colletie, Alumni 
Field, Amherst. 
445 r. -M— Informal, Drill Hall. 
Si ni.ay, Novkmukk 7. 

0-00 a. m. -Chapel. Speaker Hon. 
William Howard Tatl. 

Monday, Novkmukk 8. 

7-40 a. m- Chapel. 
h;w ,. M — Mandolin Club lleheaisal. 
Stoikbritb_'e Hall. 

Ti:k»i»ay, Novkmukk I. 
74)0 ,. xl — iVnillrv Husbandry Club. 
S tockbridgsHail, Booa* H14. 

7-15 i\ m.— Senate Meeting. 
7-80 i> M.-Glee Club liehearsal. 
Btoekbftdgc Hall, Uoom 114. 

Wki»nkhi>av, Novkmukk 10, 
3-00 P m. -Assembly. Speaker, Mr. 

Frank K. Spear, Huston. 
I'ri'siib'iit Northeastern Col- 
lege. 



CLASH WITH RHODE ISLAND 
WILL BE LAST HOME GAME 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 



COED SUPPORT 

APPRECIATED AT U. V. M. 

From the Vermont Cynic we are 
pleased to rewrite the following: 
How times do change and customs with 
them! Did you notice how those II. 
A. C. MMB cheered their co-eds lasi 
Saturday, when they arrived ai the 
game, after a 15-hour ride, covering 
almost 200 miles in a dilapitated motor 
truck? Would you cheei mn co-eds.* 
Would they show Hie pep U» ride *00 
miles to see their team play f Mind 
you, I say their team, for are they not a 
part of the University 1 They are. Just 
like the mother-in-law joke, animosity 
to the co-eds is going out of date at all 
enlleges. Do we want to be the last to 
net in line.' All Vermont will hand it 
to the M. A. C. girls for their pep in 
coming. 

CORN HUSKING AND DANCE 

The Division of Agriculture enter- 
tained the college staff at a cornhusking 
bee and dance at Drill Hall last Satur- 
day night, from eight until twelve. 
The hall was appropriately decorated 
with pumpkin and corn, and the orches- 
tra was hidden in the middle of the hall 
by piles of corn stover. Some IT", mem- 
bers of the staff and their wifes were 
present. President Buttertield appeared 
in a Wild West suit. 

During the first part of the evening 
everyone husked corn busily, and vari- 
ous friendly contests in speed took 
place. Dean Patterson and .1. B. Llnd- 
8 ey were discovered with red ears in 
their pockets. A two horse wagon was 
required to draw the com away after 
the husking was over. Refreshments 
of apple pie and cheese, popcorn balls. 
ice cream and sweet cider were served. 
The last part of the evening was spent 
in dancing, and one of the features 
was an old-fashioned Virginia reel. 



Visitors Open Work and Trick Plays 
Expected to Teat Aggie Defense. 

The last ho me game of the football 
season will take place Saturday on 
Alumni Field with Blo.de Island Slate 
College as the opposing team. Al- 
though Hhcde Island has not yet won a 
game she nevertheless will present a 
fast aggregation. She has lost to three 
strong teams. Brown, Wesleyan and 
Huston I'liivtrsity, but ha* played a 7 
to 7 tie game with the University of 
Maine, leaders In the race for the Maine 
State championship, and last Saturday 
tied Baton College by the same score. 

The Bbodt Island team is coached by 
Frank Heaney a former coach of the 
Kvcrett High School team, who has a 
good reputation among football men. 

Several Format Everett High players 

are nowon Keaney's team at Kingston 
■JBOBf them "Bill" Beck who has been 
starring all season. 

The Kingston agnictiat ion is a last, 
beav] and scrappy group. Its games 
this fall have been notable for open 
play and wide end runs. These later 
have been particularly succssful on ac- 
count of the exceptional interference 
given them. The team is also opening 
a bag full of trick plays and delays 
which ought to test the A ugie defense 
to the limit. .lohnson full back and 
Turner at halfback arc 'wo particularly 
dangerous men in the backtield while 
the man to watch in the visitors line 
will be Captain EaatWOOd at left guard. 
While Hhode Island does not appear 
nearly as formidable as Springfield or 
lulls, nevertheless Coach Core will 
send in his regular line-up in expecta- 
tion of a scrappy game. The recent ap- 
pearence of the Deans Hoard has made 
one or two players ineligible and is a 
result their will be a few shifts. Bar* 
mnt will be baak at right halt again 
and Collins will ret urn to t he fallback 
posil ion. 



Shorn 

Repairing 



Sham 

Shine 



T. MIENTKAS 



I BY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first -class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

|| Pleasant St., Amherst. Mass 



Our Bread 
Rolls and 
Pastry 



Just rill the gap between 
supper and breakfast. 



W. B. DRURY 






TWO-YEAR RECEPTION 

The committee in charge of the recep- 
tion tendered the Senior I wo veal 'men 
last Friday evening by the Junior two- 
year, is very gratified at the line co-op- 
eration shown by everyone in an effort 
to make the affair a raeeeea. 

The program for the evening included 
dancing and games, and the newly 
formed Junior qhartel , with Nichols p. 
llariison as soloist sang some tine 
selections. 

The costumes, as well as as the deco- 
rations, were suggestive of Hallowe'en 
and prizes were given for the best 
dressed lady and gentlemaa. Favors 
were given for the games, and a knife 
and candy for the costume winners. 

Mrs. Buttertield. Mrs. Hacharach, 
Prof and Mrs. Machine! and Prof, and 
Mrs. Phelan were present as guests 
of the two-year class. 



The old pre-war custom of annotinc- 
ingeleetion results was revised at M. A. 
C. this fall. Movies were held last 
night in Slockbridge Hall from 10 
o'clock to midnight, and the results 
were given to the students who were 
interested enough to remain out of bed 
to get them. 



F. M- THOMPSON & SON 
GOOD CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN 

Leather Coats 

Corduroy Vests 

Guyer Hats 

Hart Schaffner and Marx Clothes 



E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers 



RSa. U. • PAT, OFF. 



Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be rial to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C. Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

»u»».oi»«» or tmi MWMM »o«icult(j««i eMti«ie«L co«.««r 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 3, 1920. 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



ABOUT FOUNTAIN REINS 

Why not buy them on the Campus, save the walk down town and support 
an Aggie institution ? We have Conklin's, Waterman's and Moore's Pens in stock 
now, in various styles, at standard prices. 

DON'T FORGET THAT WE CARRY THEM 



M. A. C. HARRIERS SCORE 

WIN OVER W. P. I., 24-31 



Slate and Woodworth Lead Engin- 
eers Over Worcester Conrse. 

The Varsity hill and dale squad slart- 

ed its season Saturday with a decisive 

rictoxy over Worcester Tech, running 

over the Worcester course and bringing 

in a score of 1441. The MMUM covered 

litly over live miles of macadam, 

.ravel, and pasture, and included sev- 

■ ial good bills. Captain Slate romped 

D, an easy victor, in :U) minutes, and 

rc.nds. lie was closely followed 

by Woodworth. Johnson, Tech's 

ibmoi star, pursued Woodworth at 

i distance of about seventy-five yards. 

i also captured the next two places : 

\ uiiie coming through with si xtb, seven, 

and eighth. Tech placed her last two 

is in ninth and tenth positions. Of 

i he sixteen starters one Tech man failed 

to reach the finish . 

Worcester had a strong team, taring 
trimmed Trinity the previous Saturday. 
1 'he M. A. 0. men appreciated the ex- 
cellent sportsmanship of the Tech run- 
ners who used considerable precious 
breath in directing our men over the 
lomewbat tortuous course. The Aggie 
men were well entertained at the var- 
Fraternities after the race. 

The men crossed the line as follows : 

Mate, M. A. C. 

Woodworth, M. A. C. 

Johnson, Tech. 

Marston, Tech. 

Hoar, Tech. 

Macready, H. A. C. 

Rollins, M. A. 0. 

Irish, M. A. C. 

Mi is: bain, Tech. 

^ivffe, Tech. 

West, M. A. C- 

llamilton, Tech. 

Anderson, Tech. 

(iallotte, Tech. 

Cross Country has not brought out 
manj enthusiastic competitors this Fall, 
but due to the dilligent work of Coach 
Dickinson, Aggie has now an excellent 
nucleus of about a dozen men from 
which to pick her team. Credit is al>" 
iiue to Louis Lyons, Captain of Cross 
< "imtry in 1916, who ran with the men 
at the start of the season, and nave in- 
' lions in running form. Two of 
"in best hill-climbers were unable to 
>aturday: Friend '23 with a bad log, 
Mid Tanner '23. 

The Aggie hedge-busters will run 
N « Hampshire on our own course next 
iday during the Rhode Island loot* 
trams. 



D 



FIRST INFORMAL OF THE 

YEAR COMING SATURDAY 

The first informal of the season will 
be held this Saturday, Nov. ti, after the 
with Rhode Island. The eommit- 
ll year consists of J. J. McCarthy, 
1 ' ■■• iinaii ; C. G. Mackintosh '21, treas- 
James Alger '21, J. D. Snow '21, 
Douglass '21, H. E. Gaskill •fl, 
'•• H. Thompson, Jr., '22. K. W. Moody 
nd F. V. Waajrk 'J*, b goodly 
r are expected and a successful 
on is assured. 
ihe music will be furnished by 
'■ orchestra composed of Wendell 
ino; Dunbar '21, traps; M. M. 
-2, violin; Woodworth '23, han- 
*wift, coruet, and Adams, saxo- 
phone. 
The game begins at 2-20 and it is ar- 



ranged that the girls coining from 
Smith will take the 2 o'clock car from 
Northampton. The dancing will begin 
immediately after the gSfflS and tapper 
will be served in Draper Hall at 
o'clock. The dancing will then con- 
tinue until the girls from setose river 
and over the mountain have to lake 
their departure. The Smith girls will 
take the o'clock car back from Am- 
bcist center. 

The tickets are now on sale at the l'hi 
Sigma Kappa house at SI. •"«<>. After 
Thursday noon the price will go up to 
$3.7">. 'The chaperons from .Smith and 
Ml. Ilolyoke will be announced at Wed- 
nesday Assembly. 'The committee 
would greatly appreciate tin students 
obtaining tickets for infornials as soofl 
as possible after the time announced 
that they will be on sale. Providing 
enough students attend this lirst in- 
formal, the committee will endeavor lo 
run at least one informal each month 
timing the collegiaie year. 



PROBLEMS OF THE DAY 

DISCUSSED AT FORUM 

The Question of a Credit System Dis- 
cussed. Honor Constitution 
Revised. 

Adelphia under tin- diieetioii of 
Hunker *81, vice-president, conducted a 
student forum in Wednesday's As- 
sembly. The question of a credit sys- 
tem for student activities at M. A. C. 
was brought up, as was announced at 
the last forum. Martin '21 explained 
that the credit system has been quite 
successful at If. I. T. and should be eon 
sidered here at Aggie. The three main 
points in its favor are: 

1. More men would be stimulated to 
take part in activities. 

2. Men would be prevented from ne- 
glecting their studies. 

3. A definite standing would bt 
signed to student activities. 

'There were a few arguments pro and 
con. but no definite action was taken. 

A change in the honor system was 
next taken up. Haslam '21 gave reus 
ons for tlTe prop o ne d revision. 

Ballots were provided and a vote was 
taken resulting in the aeceptance of 
both amendments. 

In conclusion the students were asked 
if they hail any fault to find with the 
Dining Hall. 'There was some eomino- 
tion, but no one was willing' to make a 
criticism. 



Sophomore Class Meeting. 
The Sophomore class held its regular 
meeting Wednesday, October 27, after 
BSsemblv la the auditorium. The 
officers were chosen from a list presented 
by the nominating' committee. Those 
elected were: President, W. H. Harsh' 
man of Springfield ; rlee-presideot, N. 

I). Hilyard of Heverly : secretary, f. Q. 
Sears. Jr. of Dallon: treasurer, J. P. 
Smith of West Boxbttrj ; clssa historian. 
Miss D. V. II. "Turner of South Ainheisl: 
sargent-ai-arnis. M. W. Alger of We-i 
Hridgewater: class captain, S. K Hardy 
of Littleton. The constitution of the 

elass was changed to read that class 

elections should take place at the 
second regular meetings in October and 
February. 



Hast Friday morning al chapel the 
class of '23 challenged the class ol'24 to 
a six man rope-pull, to be held l.eivv i 

the halves of the Hhode [aland football 

game next Saturday. 'The Freshmen 
accepted the challenge at Monday 
chapel. 

*W. — Louis Schwartz is with a Fruit 
Produce C pany in California. 



The 1(122 Inttcs board is collecting 
material foi this year's publication in 
good season. Croup pictures were taken 
last Sunday in front of the T.ntomologv 
Huilding of the various student organ 
i/.atious. 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Friday- 
Hat, at 3 

Eve. at » 



Saturday 

Hat. al 3 

Eve. I shows 

6-45. 8-30 



Monday 

Hst. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Wallace Reid. LiU Lee. 
HarrUon Ford ami Theo- 
dore Robert! ii "Hawthorne 
of the U. S. A." I lie piny in 
which " Dons" KaliliankH 
■tarred <m the itase. 
Pathe Newt Mutt and Jeff 
Topic* Comedy 

J. Warren Kerrigan sad 
Fritsi Brunette in "Number 
uo ." ( oiitniiiH fiioiiitii action, 
snipeneeand original corned] 
iltnations far three pictures. 

Scenic reel 

"After the Bawl. Steel 
Carter Oe Haven Comedy 



Billie Burke and James 
Crane in "Wanted A Hui- 
band." b] Bamoel Hopkins 

Adams. A c eily • drama 

sbonl a tfiri who Invents ■ 
dance. 
"Hidden Danger*." serial 

Pathe New* Comedy 

Norma Talmadse ami Con* 
way Tearle in "She Love* 
and Lie*." rrom Wllkle < ol 

lin^' inn el A new CO Bled | 
romance with Norma III t lie 

dual in ie uf ii.-t bnsband'i 
matroni] m Ife ami % I vac lout 

allinit). 

I reel Chrictie Comedy 

Pathe Review 



Northampton . Mas*. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Heat 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Are. shown. 

Program changed daily except Henday 

and Tuesday. 

FHKKK r. HKI.MONT. Manager. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



A $500 Stock of College Banners and Pennants 

TO BE SOLD AT COST 

See me before you buy — Where U buy the paper. 

TASK, 12 North 



AMHERST LAUNDRY 

Han just Installed ■ n«-w machine, the latest "Prosperity Hosom Boily Press' 1 for 
shirts. This presses the entire front and around the neck at one time, Having 
w< ar anil gislaf the shirt a uniform smooth finish. 
Citizens ..t Amherst eordially invited to visit the Laundry and see it in operation. 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IflC. Northampton, Mass. 

Our Art Department Is filled with ptetStSS 
■nimble for the ileeor:it ion of "frat" limine*. 



An optical stion which saassniss up to the 
blaheal standard of modern service, Von 

can rely on our skill and Sued taste In all 
optical matters. 



or for birthday anil weddlas Kifts. Greeting 

cards for particular people. 



HARDWARE 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 3, 1920. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE GAME 

Continued from page i 



points for his team on a beautiful drop- 
kick from the 20-yard line. Soon after 
the second half commenced he watt 
sent over for the only touchdown of the 
game. His work certainly seemed to 
justify the possibility of his selection 
as an all-collegiate hackfield man. 

• l Kd" Tumey, C.rayBon, and Lent were 
the only men on the M. A. C. team who 
played their usual game. Mackintosh 
at center played a great game on the 
defense hut offensively he was not up 
to his usual standards and was outplayed 
by llarvell. 

Captain Poole at quarter has been 
Bending his backs against inferior lines 
all season, so that when the strong New 
Hampshire line confronted him, it took 
him the greater part of the game to 
acciiHtom himself to a change of tactics. 
The tackling by M. A. C. men was 
the best that has been seen on Alumni 
Field for a loBf time. It was hard and 
sure, and in the particular cases of 
(Jrayson and Cotton, it was timely. 

Before the game, the student body 
assembled at the Social Union and led 
by the College Band, inarched to the 
field in column of fours. The cheering 
on both sides was continuous ami 
snappy during the game, for nearly two 
hundred of the New Hampshire student 
body followed their team in autos and 
trucks. 

In the first quarter New Hampshire 
held the ball nearly all the time. Re- 
peated gains by Hustafson and Connors 
finally put Connors in position to score 
bis dropkick goal. Collins and Poole 
made short gains this quarter but the 
ball was held in Aggie territory. 

At the first of the second quarter, long 
gains by Collins and Tumey brought 
the ball within scoring position, but 
Aggie lost it on downs when a long 
forward to Cascio was missed. In this 
quarter, Lent brought tbe home 



supporters to their feet by his line open 
tield running, which netted him'.Beveral 
gala* <>f ten to thirty yards. 

Connor's touchdown, following a pen- 
alty, gave New Hampshire their last 
score in the third period. Here again, 
Tumey and Lent made repeated gains, 
and the ball was brought to New 
Hampshire's five yard line, only to be 
lost on downs after three futile attempts 
to gain through the line. 

In the fourth quarter, (irayson 
brought a ray of hope to Aggie sup- 
porters when he caught a forward from 
l'oole and was only pulled down on the 
tive yard line. Sargent took the ball for 
four more yards and then for the third 
time, New Hampshire presented a 
stubborn resistance to tbe Aggie backs. 
Sargent had replaced Tumey, and al- 
though only in the game for tive 
minutes, he made Beveral brilliant 
gains on end runs. The game ended 
when Tarplin, who had replaced Lent, 
went around end for ten yards. 

The game was far from discouraging 
to M. A.C., and one such defeat will 
only make the team tight harder for the 
remaining three gatneB. 

The Score: 



CAMPUS NOTES 



M. A. C. 

Cascio, le 
McCarthy, le 
(irey, le 
Cotton, It 
Mohor. lg 
MacKintosh, c 
Latour, rg 
Hrigbam, rg 
Freeman, rg 
King, rt 
Cray-son, re 
Poole, qb 
Lent, lhb 
Tarplin, lhb 
Sargent, rbb 
Collins, rhb. tb 



NK.W HAMI'KIIIKK 

le, Leavitt 
It, (iadbois 
lg, Cotton 
c, Harwell 
rg, (iraham 
re, Christiansen 
re, Anderson 
qb, Reardon 
lhb. Rumazza 
rhb, Gustafsen 
fb. ConnorB 



Leavitt '21, Sampson '21, and Cay '3B 
are at the Infirmary on sick leave 

A Hallowe'en lions.- party at the 
Kappa Camma Phi house, last Satur- 
day, following the New Hampshire 
State game, was enjoyed by 10 couples. 
Davenport's orchestra furnished tbe 
music, and Mrs. Cassin, a local caterer 
served a buffet lunch for tbe party. 
Mrs. Skinner of Mt. Holyoke, and Miss 
Arnold of Smith, were the patronesses. 
Dancing lasted until 10 o'clock. The 
house was very appropriately and 
attractively decorated with a Hallowe'en 
setting of pumpkins, jack-o'lanterns, 
cornstalks, and black and orange crepe 
paper streamers. 

The houseparty of the Phi Sigma 
Kappa fraternity after the game Satur- 
day was attended by 25 couples. Both 
local ami smith girls were present. The 
chaperons were Mrs. Hicks of M. A. C. 
ami Miss Zurbrack of Smith. Dunbar 
and Smith's orchestra furnished the 
music, and Woodworth '23 played banjo 
and mandolin selections. The dancing 
lasted until MO r>. H. A buffet lunch- 
eon was served in the house. Among 
the alumni present at the party were 
"Mike" Brewer '14, who brought Mrs. 
Brewer with him, "Chick" Davies '14, 
"Jack" Hutchinson '14, and "Ned" 
Edwards '14. 

The Kappa Sigma fraternity held a 
houseparty after the game last Satur- 
day, and 18 couples were entertained. 
Most of the girls were from Mt. Holyoke 
with Miss Devlin as chaperon. Frost's 
local orchestra played lor tbe dancing, 
hich lasted until time for the "last 
car.'' Refreshments were served in the 
house. Carl Gushin '17, Richard Smith 
'17, Pratt '18, "Bob" Skinner '20, and 
"Don" Cook ex-'21 were back for the 
game and the party. 



'17. — II. T Stowell is in the New 
Salem High School teaching Agricul- 
tural subjects. 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

CATKKINti K()K 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At KKATKKMTIK8 KVKKV SIGHT 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

(Give u» • trial' 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 

G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



Oet the Habit 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

The Leading Tailor and 
Gen id Fu m ish ing$ 

— Full Dress Suits to Rent — 

Clothes sponged and pressed by 
Hoffman Machine 

Our Work- ix (liKirttitteerf. 

Come and open an account with me. 

phonm aoa-w 

11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



Tumey, fb 

Score-N. II. State 9, M. A. C. <>. 
Touchdown — Connors; goal from field— 
Connors. Time— 15 minute quarters. 

SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

tteieree'B equipment seemed to be 
in pretty bad shape last Saturday. First 
the stop watch refused to go in the var- 
sity game, and then Chapman found 
his whistle too far gone to blow at the 
close of tbe Freshman contest. The 
latter accident cost the yearlings six 
points. 

Those Granite State rooters surely had 
a pleasant surprise. Money that was 
deep down out of sight before the game 
started was flashed around promiscuous- 
ly immediately after the who half had 
ended. 

Being very jubilant over the score 
of the New Hampshire game last Satur- 
day, a few Durham studeuts were seen 
riding home in a truck which bore a 
sign reading, "we're the guys that put 
the Hearse in Amherst." 

Among the spectators of Saturday's 
game was one who will always have a 
deep interest in "Aggie" football. He 
carries a stiff knee gained in playing 
football for M. A. C. on the same team 
with "Gid" Mackintosh's father. 

More than one New Hampshire man 
realized more than his expenses down 
bere after the game was over. "Aggie," 
men never "welch" on their bets. 



ALUMNI 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUdS AND CARPETS 

- K. D. MARSH K8TATK- 



C. F. OYER 



'17.— W. G. Buchanan is at present 
connected with the Department of Ag- 
riculture at the Bernardston High 
School. 



Ex-'23.— George E. Baker was back on 
the campus last Saturday. He has 
transferred to Colgate this year. 



"»4.— .John K. Cifford is acting as In- 
structor of Agriculture at the Worcester 
High School. 

•(»o.— Fred A. Merrill was several 
years teacher of agriculture at the 
Georgia State Normal School at Athens, 
(ia. Daring the war period he was one 
of the regional agents under the gov- 
ernment in charge of the School Garden 
Army with the Bureau of Education. 
He has recently been appointed as 
specialist in Agricultural Education 
with the Division of Agriculture and as 
instructor in States Relation. Service 
with the I'nited States Department of 
Agriculture. 

'11.— Edwin B. Young, for some years 
a High School principal is now con- 
nected with the Plymouth High School 
in the Department of Agricultural In- 
struction. 

"12.— Curt's Beckham is instructor of 
poultry at the Bristol County Agricul- 
tural School, Segreganset, Mass. 

'13. — J. S. Carver is instructor of 
poultry at the Essex County Agricul- 
tural School, Hathorne, Mass. 

'13.— Julius Matz is acting as assist- 
ant plant pathologist at the experiment 
station, Gainsville, Fla. 

'16. — Captain and Mrs. J. S. Hemen- 
way paid a visit to the campus last 
week-end aud attended the New Hamp- 
shire game. 

17. — L. K. Richardson is at work at 
the Coggshall Apiary, Cretan, N. Y. 

17.— \V. II. Loring is engaged in agri- 
cultural work at Hopkins Academy, 
Hadley, Mass. 

'20.— James C. Maples was on the 
campus last week. 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



AT — 

Economy Prices 



E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 
Main St., Amherst 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel.416-W) Hadley. Mass 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, - M*»* 



—The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 



V 



- 



JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place for 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 





rrn 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 10, 1920. 



M. A. CVS. SPRINGFIELD AT 
PRATT FIELD SATURDAY 



Strong Aggie Team is Confident That 

the "Goodwin Pep" will Bring 

a Big Victory. 

This from the Springfield College 
paper early la the season. "In our big 
inline, tbe one with Mass. Aggie*, we 
ire out for blood, it is proverbial that 
l ■ iher team may make a poor showing 





■ *6 


Bsl JgWCT. v 




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rj $rmll£ 


■ "•^ * , «*maaaJ*'" 




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jm a t ^ mm m 


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i 





M.A. C. HARRIERS 

LOSE TO N. H. 27-29 



R. I. STATE TIES 

AGGIE ELEVEN 7-7 



Don aid m. Lan 

I Utt Maroon anil White halfback who lias been 
onaistent t: round gainer all season. 



on the remainder of their schedule and 
ret put up a truly remarkable name in 
Hie annual contest stayed at Pratt Field. 
We are still leading in number of 
tea won with eleven victories to nine 
•It teats and three ties." 

From this statement it is evident that 
M. A. C. is going against a team Sat- 
urday which is full of pep and enthus- 
UMB, but no Aggie man who saw the 
1919 game at Trail Field will forget the 
it and determination with which 
1 iptain Pond's men went into that 
[ana. They all wanted that game 
badly and they went after it. Aggie 
lias a line this year that is going to 
-liow the Goodwin pep right through 
from end to end. The backlield, fresh 
Iron a short rest, will be in the condi- 
tion they were in at the start of the 
Vermont game, and when the whistle 
Saturday .the entire Aggie student 
v will be on the sidelines. It's a com- 
bination which can not be beaten. 

Springfield defeated IJowdoin 21-0 in 
Hieir first game. Since then they have 
not won a game and have been out- 
sell sixty-two points by their op- 
ponents. Yet this does not mean an 
I game, necessarily, for since tbe 
i'»iwdoin game Springfield has uncorked 
■ system of aerial attack which has 
led both Brown and Holy Cross,so 
i the two together have scored only 
oints against Springfield. Spring- 
I blames "'the irony of fate'" for one 
Brown's touchdowns. This "fate", 
ntercepted forward pass, is the kind 
[Continued on pace SI 



Leath Finishes First in Probably Rec- 
ord Time. 

CaptalB Weston's New Hampshire 
Harriers defeated Male's feme- jump- 
er- by the narrow margin of two points, 
last Saturday, running over the M.A. 
(' live-mile course. It was a clean, fast 
rare from stall to finish, and Aggie may 
leel that her cross-country team gave 
one of the best teams in New Knglaml a 
hard run. Lealh, who has been for 
several years running mate to Nightin- 
gale, was lirst over the line, covering 
the distance in M min. Captain Slate 
came in next in M min. M sec, and was 
eloaelj pursued by "Skip"' Weston, cap- 
tain ot the N. H. Woodworth, 

Aggie's grilty Bll-MHiad track man, 
took fourth position. 

The men started at tbe Drill Hall and 
finished on Alumni Field, between the 
halvesof I tit- Rhode Island game, the 
men running directly across the field 
and eliding under the South goal post. 

Ulcr the first half mi le, the runners 
fioind their paalttOM a'"' hold them in 
most instances, to the finish. A notable 
feature of the race was that every man 
of the 1M starters finished, the men fol- 
lowing each other closely, leaving no 
stragglers. Probably, the time Satur- 
day was the best ever made over the 
Aggie course. The previous record was 
field by Louis Lyons, captain of Cross- 
country in liflrJ, who covered the dis- 
tance in M min. 31 Bee. The record 
made Saturday cannot, however, be 

held ofiicial as it was made over a 
slightly different course than had been 

previously used. 
The order of finishing was as follows: 
Leath. N. H.:Slale.M. A.C; Weston, 

N. II.: Woodworth, M.A. C. ; Craves. 

N. II.: Rolitae, M. A. «'.: Higglae, 

N. H.: MacCready, M. A. ('.; Irish, M. 

A.C.; Wcst,M.A.C; French, N. II.. 

Moody. N. H.: Martin, \. H.: Kvers, M. 

\. C; Hooper, M. A.C.; Newman, N. II. 
s„..e \. II W, M. A, C 27. 
Next Saturday, Aggie will have a 

team at the New F.ngland lntercolleg- 

iates to be held in Huston. 



Blocked Punt in First Period Paves 
Way for Visitor's Score. 

Presenting the heaviest 11*4 lhai thi 

Maroon and While has laced I his sea- 
son, coupled with a versatile style of 
play, and favored by good fortune the 
U. I. Slate eleven got a 77 tie verdict 
in their tilt with the Massachusetts 
aggieeoa Alumni Field Saturday after- 
noon. Man for man, Captain Poole's 
oiitlit played better football, and out- 
rushed the visitors, keeping the play 
almost entirely in their territory during 
three of the four peoiods. Only once, 
at the opening of the second hall did 
R. I. display a consistent ground gain- 
ing otfensivc. 

The scoring came early in the game 
by both teams, K.I. registering seven 
points in I he first quarter by virtue of 
a blocked kick; and Aggie hammering 
through to a touchdown early la fhe 
second period. Thereafter the game 
settled down into a punting defence by 
the visitors against a Maroon and 
While offence thai carried the pla\ 
well down into EL 1. territory ,aud twuc 
threatened to score. 

The game in detail. 

King kicked off to It. 1. and the ball 
was put into play on their 2U-yard line. 
Two line plays and an end run tailed to 
gain and Johnson punted to Sargent. 
K. 1, recovered a Massachusetts back 
field fumble and aided by a 1". yard for- 
ward pass. Heck lo Totman advanced 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 



of 



Uoger W Baheoa, statistician, 
Wellesley Hills, last Wednesday in 
Assembly, gave one of the most force- 
ful and thoroughly interesting talks 
that has been heard here for 
several weeks. His work is closely 
Connected with the captains of industry 
and he told a few of the things which 
he has learned about the American 
businessman lathe 18 years in which 
he has come into contact with him. 

There are opportunities in every line 
of business. Not a single commodity 
known in which somebody, 
[Continued on r*B"e 1 1 




No. 6 



is 



ON TO SPRINGFIELD 



Raymond II. Chayhon 

Sophomore end. who has earned a regular berth 

In his first year with the varsity. 

to Aggies' three yard line, where M. \. 
C. took the ball on downs. K. I. broke 
through, blocking Collin's attempted 
punt, and Totman, Khody's right end, 
fell on the ball behind the goal line for 
a touchdown. Johnson kicked tbe 
goal. Score. R. I. 7, M. A. C. 0, Play 
[Continued on page ej 



WILLIAM H. TAFT OPENS 
YEAR'S SUNDAY CHAPELS 

Speaks on "Success and How to Ob- 
tain It" to Capacity Audito- 
rium Audience. 



The college was foil uiiale in having 

for its speaker at Sunday i ning 

chapel, ex-president William Howard 
Tall. This was Mr. Tail's second ap 
pearance in the auditorium, his first be- 
ing six yean agO when he delivered 

1 1 peniog a dill ess a I I he ded icat ion of 

Sloekhlidge Hall. 

Mr. Tail spokeoii success and the best 
way to attain such in the work which 
we p I. iii lo follow. Real success is use- 
fulness In one's sell, borne, friends, and 
community, and it can nevei be al lained 
except by haul work and not work in 
the sense of routine. No great accom- 
plishment can ever belong lo any of us 
unless al some period during our lives 
we are forced to perioral work which 
at the time seems mere drudgciv. In 
the work which we perform we miisl al 
ways he I borough. and never be hurried 

in etvppj Mr. Tall gaw epl« 

of thoroughness, Ibe instance which 
Hooker T. Washington relates in has 
book, "l'p From Slavery." In seeking 
admission to Hampton Institute, Mr. 
Washington was told that hi whs nol 
wanted, but was linally given an oppor- 
tunity by the woman in charge lo show 
what he could do by cleaning a room. 
When he had finished, the woman, who 
happened lo be from New Knglaml, de- 
cided thai the thoroughness of his work 
alone warranteil his admission to t he col 
lege. It was his thuroiiuhness in small 
things that later made him such an in- 
lluence in teaching bis race the value 
of hard work. The cause of unrest in 
the industrial world is caused, not l>\ 
pOOt wages ami conditions, but by a 
lack of utilizing every minute and a 
failure of putting full work in Ibe full 
hour. We have every chance in the 
world for success for there was nevei I 
time when the man who performed 
conscientious work was not sooner or 
later rewarded. 

Contrary to popular opinion, the so- 
called college grind does make good in 
life. As a result of an investigation 
carried out by A .Lawrence Lowell, it hai 
been proved thai 75 per cent, of the 
country's leaders were from Ibe ten per 
cent highest in scholarship, and these 
men do make good because they have 
learned the value of hard work. Mr. 
Tafl laid emphasis on (he fact I hat we 
are here primarily for studies, ami we 
must not build a labyrinth of athletic 
and non-athletic activities around a 
thread of studies. Another important 
factor in success is the habit of thrift, 
and it may well be sailed a brother 
of work. Thrift is necessary to life 
and it was this instinct that <li- 
veloped the cave dweller into the man 
of tbe present. As a builder of charac- 



t» 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 10, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collepian, Wednesday, November 10, 1920. 




ter, thrift is unsurpassed l..r ii tea. lies 
to i lie individual, sell respect. In order 
to win Kuccess we must learn how to gel 

along wltb people. We are ooatlBually 
baea ping into people of different eorte, 

!>ut we must always keep in mind what 
iH due them and have consider- 
ation for their wishes. Manners, which 

mlghl well be defined eel ae"doctrlne of 

fair play. "or the ■ebooltng Of one's tell 
in the ideas of others, is a thing t> 
which meiiiKcrs.it the present BOllege 

feneration might well Improve. Man 

Ben is only another term lot self-re- 
straint and self-control, a thing which 
Bolshevists and similar people have not 
yet learned. The greatest example "I 
self control in our democracy is the 
election, when the defeated minority 
suliinits to the wi iminy majority w it li- 
mit causing any iroiil.lt;. 

In elotlng, Mr. Tail said, '•Success is 

the achievement of bapplneae and real 

happiness ll that mental state in which 
you realize that l.y your success y..u 
have helped others." Happiness is not 
measured in riches, and if each one is 
Willing to do his share, and ewll a little 

hit more, and have c Igb money to 

support his family, he will ettrely have 
gained success and happiness in his 
life. 

ENTIRE STUDENT BODY 

GOING TO SPRINGFIELD 
The Springfield-Aggie football game 

has been postponed to Sat ur. lay , Nov. 

13. The game was originally planned 

lor Armistice Day. hut as that day is 
not to he a legal holiday this year post- 
ponement was decided advisable. 

Tickets for the special train to Spring- 
field may he purchased at (he Phi 

Sigma Kappa House any evening this 

week, from 7-00 to H-00 ..'.-lock. The 
price of the round trip will lie $3.06. 
Que Way tickets will also he sold. 

The train will have either six or 



VARSITY SECONDS DEFEAT 
STRONG PREP SCHOOL TEAM 

Deerfield Loses 35-0. Roser, Bent 
and Clark Score. 
Laii Friday "Bob" Holmes took the 

Varsitv second team to Deerfield to 
play the stroll- Deerfield Academy 

stores Ths team ttom n>ggi« «"" 

handily hy a MM) score. Deerfield 
\ca.lemv has one of t he l.est learns in 

iis history, baring wo., all its garnet hy 
■nbetantlal won Friday's game 

being the first they had lost this year. 

They are a heavy team, illghtlj out- 
weighing our aecond team, and pni up 
a game, scrappy exhibition. 

The first half ended with the score 

7-o in favor ot the second team. There 
wee a number ..i penalties during this 
halt and the aggie Ham OOttld not 

■eem to gel aadei way. Victor Batter 
Held, Proxy's ion, played qnarler [or 

De.ili. hi and go! away for several good 
runs during this period. 

The second half was a different story. 
The aggie offense got nndei waj and 

scored two touchdowns in each quarter. 

(lark to Roser was the aerial route for 
three touchdowns ami the other two 
were made l.y I'.ent on end runs. 

Marshman featured the game with 

his kicking, end smashes through cen- 
ter. His kickofls all went to the Deer- 
geld Bve-yard line and his punting was 
,,i the best calibre. Jakemaa's eoaeh- 

ii.M D M certainly 'unproved this man s 
kickiim. Clark, the second String 

quarter, kicked every one of the live 
goals from touchdown thereby running 
his season's string up to 12 with no 

ntis^ 

The Aggie line proved very effective; 
the playing of Freeman, Davenport. 

Waile and \ li;er heinic very creditahle. 

Sweetser, McKay and Burro played well 

tOt De< rfield. Captain BixleX was also 



V 




L 



V*\ 



Your dressing for the Thanksgiving festivities is all here, from cravats to 
socks, from gloves to hats, from overcoats to underwear. A special suit, 
single or double breasted in « cheerful brown effect, cut form-fitting, at $50 
for young men. Hand tailored— character in every curve. Individualiu 
in every line. Overcoats in very snappy models from $40 lo $75. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

Home of Hmi-t Schaffncr « Marx Clothe* 

144 Main Street, Northampton 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KUS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Candy Shop 



Northampton. 



BEICKM ANTS 

Candies and Ice Cream 



'* Parlor 



MaamaohummtlB 



seven cars, and over ."itM) students are 
expected to make the trip. The special 
will leave the 15. ,V M station at 11-80 
A. M.. and will leave Springfield for 
Amherst at 11*18 r. H. Il will arrive at 

Springfield at Uhtfi t, u., and the stu- 
dents will have M minutes for lunclicn. 

The parade for Pratt Field will start 
from the vicinity of the Union Station 
at 1-00 o'clock. 

Prof . Hicks basgauie tickets for sale 
at his office in the Drill Ball, and the 
College Store hai tickets for "Princess 
Virtue," a musical comedy at Court 
Square theater. I. n sale at 11.30 each. 



conspicuous. 

The second team line-up: 

MacCaithy le. Wents.h It, W'aite If, 

fcfndgetl lu. freeman e, Alger rg, Qould 

rg, Packer e, Davenport it, Hoser re. 
(lark qb, heals rhh, Beat lhh, MaieSt* 
man fb, Field fb. 

TOTAL ENROLLMENT 

IS OVER 800 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



-FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



"The Home of Sweets 



>» 



FRESHMAN WIN ANNUAL 

SIX MAN ROPE PULL 
The Annual Sophomore-Fresbman 

Six-Man Bopc Pull took place last Sat- 
urday afternoon between the halves of 
the football name with Rhode Island 
State College, and resulted in a well-de- 

served victory by the Tear! logs. The 

contest was three minutes in duration, 
and was an evenly matched affair. 

Tbe signal for starting was given by 
Professor IfeLaugblin. At the Instant 

the pistol was Hied hot h sides went to 

it with a will, and although the Sopho- 
mores gained a few inches at the start 
by getting tbe "jnmp", the Freshmen, 

keeping time to the "heave" of the 
mentor, Fuller '2d. gradually drew the 
rope to their side, so that when the 
pistol was tired at the close ol the con- 
test, the Kiosh bad acquired 18 inches 

of the rope. The Sophomore coach was 

Newell '"20. The Freeh men part lei pat* 
log In the pull were Wood worth, Per* 
ranti. Brunoer, Davis, Pernald, ami 

Kintx. Their opponents were Williams. 

Hardy, Gordon, Holly, Abele, ami 

No we is. 



Fiva Hundred Students in Regular 
Course, Including 50 Women. 
The following are the statistics ..1 

enrollment of at. A. G. tar ihejearHWQ- 
■21. as given out at the Held Secretary's 

office. A Copy of these lias been sent to 
each fraternity to he used hy them as 
necessary in their puhlieatiotiH. 

Enrollment in work of college grade; 

Men Women Total 



(lass 

Graduates 
1091 

11122 
1H2:1 
1.V24 

Unclassified 
Special 

Totals 



94 
88 

M 

122 
9 
2 



7 


42 


3 


1»7 


5 


9K 


8 


104 


11 


IS8 


1 


10 


11 


13 



461 



4<i 4!»7 




Enrollment in Short course: 
■Jvr. < -OUrse, 2ml yr.. ISA 



2-vi . ( oiiise. 1st y 1.. 
Vocational Poultry 
I'nit Courses, Sept. 



188 

19 

.!(» :',7 



10 

12 

tl 



135 



H» 



314 



22 386 



Total of all students Ml 



Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain of the 
Chemistry Department Is busy reading 

,,,'onf of his new hook. "A Text-hook in 

Organic Chemistry. 



MOST men prefer the pipe to any other form of smoking. 
There's comfort, contentment, real satisfaction and 
economy in a j;ood pipe. W D C Pipes give you this, and 
more. A special seasoning process makes the genuine French 
briar bowl break in sweet and mellow. Pick a good shape 
at your nearest dealer's, at your price. 

6t CO.. NEW YORK 




PIPES 



TWO YEAR ELEVEN 

DEFEATS CUSHING 20-7 

The two-year team scored their tirst 
win of the season last Saturday altei- 
M.ou at Ashliiiinhain, where they de 
ted Cashing Academy to the tune of 
_'ii-7. Cashing put a line team on the 
• and seemed contidenl >>f winning. 
,s they had, previous to this, lied 
Worcester Academy and Will Is ton, and 

:i,.t lost :1 gasae. 

Cashing won the toss and received 

kick-.df. They tried two plays, 

hen a punt. The two-years' took the 

kill and went right down the field with 

line plays and end runs for a tOUCb- 

iWn. They missed the goal. In the 

necund quarter Steele threw a pass to 

,r.i [rea Cusblag's 46-yard Ilea, and 

lerard look il d<>WB to I he one-fool line. 
.,i play look it over for I lie second 

touchdown. Iferwln kicked the goal. 
I he hall was in Cosh log's territory for 

i he reel of the period, hut penalties 
PBted a t wo-yeai sore. 
I he second half began with the two- 
war's receiving the kick-olf. The ball 

was fnmbled Mid rolled behind the 

il-line, where Pickard recovered ii 
;in.l got as far as the 30-y.ud line. The 
two-year's then took the hall right 

down the field, galalag M yards at 

b rush. Another forward pass i.> 

Serard netted 86 yard*. The ball was 

n on the lh-yard line. A poor pass 
hoiinced into the hands of Cush leg's 

eft end, who hail a good start and took 
ii down the lield for a touchdown, mak- 

Cushlng'e only eeore. They kicked 
goal. After the kh-k -oil a forward 

- from Steele to lieiard took the hall 
20 yards. 1'ickanl, alter a series ol 
line hueks down the tield, look the 
hall over froSB the live-yard line in Iwo 

plays. Herwia kicked the goal, mak- 
ing the score twenty t*> seven. The 
i let ended shortly alter. 

There was sm seoring on either side 

daring the last quarter. The hall was 
in Cnshlag'S territory most of the time. 

but the fighting was hard with little 

Gerard, Wlggia and SnelliBg 

did good work for the two-year eleven, 

I i day afternoon at 2-30 the team plays 

the Connection! aggie seconds, ami 
ire is a possibility ol a gasae aits 

Deerfield Academy the following week. 
The line-up : 



YEARLINGS SWAMPED BY 

STRONG W1LL1ST0N ELEVEN 

Favored both la weight and football 
experience, the Willlstos academy 

team swamped the Aggie yearling! ''1-tl, 
at EasthamptOO, last Saturday. The 
Freshmen only used two substitutes, 

because ol the large number <>i men 

who v BIS made Ineligible l.y failure in 
studies. 

Smith, Willision's olevet Lack, ran 
the tirst kick-oil Lack 80 yards tor S 
tOUCbdoWB, and llom that time on, the 
hall was in the hands of 1 he I'.ast hainp- 
loii lads the majority of the time. M . 
A. < . made most ol its gains OB line 

plunges. Nelson pat up a fine game at 
guard. The Freshmen showed their 
good training by ths nsaaaei la which 

i hey stood up under the gafl "I the 

rushes of ths heavy opposing line, 

The line-ups. 
w ll.l.lsTi.N . m. v. t . 

.lancsy, Btrong, le le. Chase 

Bobbins, Janeey, It, rt, Btaebaer 

Bt arret t, Ig ';: Barker, Neis.m 

Pennaman, Tlefayn, <• e, Wllbelm 

Qalbraitb, Qraaey, rg It, M\ rick 

fork, n Ig, Balmoa 

Carter, re '«•• Moyee, Emery 

Penchoea, Buckley, qb qb, BHski 

Smith, Busaler, Mills, lhh rhh, Bartlett 
Qreen, rhh 'hi., Tewblll 

Sheldon. II. Ih. Williams 

Beore; WllUetoaol, M. A. C. fresh 

men 0. Touchdowns. "Sheldon 2, I'en- 

sboea 1, Smith I, charier 2. Qreen. 

Goals from touchdown Sheldon 7. 

fieferet I aster. Umpire — Williams. 

Mead linesman BurgOCB, lime 1'. 

minute quarters. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
GRANGE STORE 

Tine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Bmn.iuiD IMua 

Stkphkn Lank Foi.tn k. inc.. 

MiNlirACn'HINIJ .IKVVKl.RRM 

1 HO BM >A I ) \V A Y . r-' K.W Y « Hi U 

i BCTJfJ AND < OI.I.IM . »-. 
PINH AM) WIN<JN «* 

llill.ll. vill.VHK AND UKON/.N MMDAI.M 

Start your Springfield game "pep" early 

COME TO THE DANCE 

\ i — 
Masonic Hall, l-riday Night, Nov. 12 

JERRY'S JAZZ BAND 



SI I. (IUK LINK (IK 



Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hose f..r comfort to 

■real with low shoes, A good 
assort men: of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



iimiim. \< u>nxi 
le. Hubbard 
It. Brlgban 

I-. Lee 

c, Posts) 

rn, l*il tic- 
it , Desinaiais 

re, Payne 
i|i». Cass 

rlili. Hat t in 
lhh, Young 

fl». Ilutcliins 
><ure: U*ajt.f0\ CsMblng7. Touch- 
us: iMckurd :?; Bubbard. 

stitutioiiM, M. A. (.'. : Wood for 

M i win, Merwin for Wood, bleating f 01 

remondl, Qerreroondl tot Keating. 

mi-: Comeffard for Case, Teatteti 

Battia. 



M. A. ( . 

1 ■■ raid, re 

s liellillK, rt 

M.i u in, |g 
Itnj inond, c 
r.urueit. lu 

i ley, It 
Uerremondt, le, 
Kicbardson, qb, 

' kald, rlili. 

_ In, lhl». 
s, fb, 



LIBRARY ACQUISITIONS 

I STO I. >>..Us recelillv ailded to tile li- 

i.iar.v oolleetloa, should beeflaterest 
Bveryone both beeause <.i tbelreoa- 

lelils and their uni.|Ueness. One, en- 
titled "Hortus Qrammeus Woburnen- 
sis." i>> George Sinclair, was published 
in 1810. it Is a deaeriptloa of expert* 
meats oa the productloa and BBtrltlre 
value .if gras 

'the other hook entitled "The Nat- 
ural History of Maize'" hy .Mattl.ieii 
BonafoBsmsnd was publlaaed in 1886. 

It is written in h'reneh and contains some 

wonderful plates ..t tbe different rarle- 
i maize. 



SPRINGFIELD CAME SATURDAY 



PRACTICE AFTER DARK 

].\\ days sgO one of I lie c unit iv a 
ling papers made the statemeni ih.it 
nell, in using searchlights for prsc- 

itter dark, had introduced a new 

• mi into eollegiate football. This 

be the truth as far as the editor 

•• inn everyone in Amherst knows 

-nee the year before t he w at - M. 

has used searchlights for practice 

late November afternoons and 
s. The Aggie coach had apple 
he extra hour or so that this 

n afforded. 

■ 



Continued fron 



( ,t hi opportunity (hat a team such as 
Aggie has. is always on iis toes l.u. 
There :. rtalB tew men on the 

kggiedefeaee who are jioinn to have a 
tine time breaking up their opponents, 
forward paseea. It was these forwards 

that held Holy Cross, Heel Point, and 
BroWB to small scores so that with these 
taken care of il seems aim. .si certain 

that sn Agffie triumph is due, for tbe 
feature ..i 'he K. A. C. team work tins 

year lias been the defensive pla\ of the 
line in Stopping line plmiees and <>fl 
tackle plays. < OSCh Sore has spent a 
u rcat deal ol time With h is ends lately . 
coaching them to watch for trick plays 
around end. We have two bald tS 

lersplsying tbe wlag positions srhoare 

fagl meg .'"i' 1 should he able to bleak 
down any attempted runs from a tor- 
ward pass formal 

The team, the pep, and surely not 
least, the student hodj i great com- 
bination and a trio thai i* going t<> be 
thrown with tull streagth at Spring- 
tield next Saturday. Fee, Springfield; 

"We ale out tor blood, too 

ON TO SPRINGFIELD 



Northampton, Mass. 
The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



I 



V ^ 



-PRESIDENT T A 1^ T 

Urges every college nan i<> carry life Insurance. 

Insure with CHARLES w CI RTIN, Rep., 2 McCtelian St. Tel S12-R 

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 



THE NEW M. A, C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 
LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 

Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

Reasonable in dollars and '•sense." Manufactured by 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., Sooth Deerfield, Mass. Tel. 140 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 




$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 

MORANDI - PROCTOE COMPANY 
rs Institution Cooking Apparatus 



Manufacture 
of 

86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON 



C&rp*rvter S Morehous*, 
PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherst, Maaa 






The Mf*o»chiisette Collegian, Wednesday, November 10, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 10, 1920. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



HO A HI) OF EDITORS. 



Lttnunoa P. Maiitin », Editor In-Chief 

Khhkkt I.. Jones "M ManaelnB Kdltor 

Abbociatk Khitohs. 

GEOKOH. W. El'MAN "2t 

Kk.vnkih A. Bahnako "22 
Stanley W. Hkomi.ey "-'-' 
I'M I. I.. Hi knktt "22 

lloiulil W. Si-kino "22 
Kk.i.imnc. F. Jackson '22 
John M. Win tt i n '28 

I.. II. AlOONOIoN "H 



During the lirsl three years of his 
stay at ME. h. C Pfof. Jones was an in- 
structor in. the Department of Agron- 
omy. He entered the Extension Ser- 
vice In July. 1918, and has been Inten- 
sion Professor of Agronomy until now. 

Ohio State University will receive a 
man who is thoroughly acquainted with 
all branches of agronomy, a man who 
has devoted all his time to the needs of 
the torn in this special lield. His loss 
will be keenly felt by all those con- 
nected with him in Massachusetts. 



HlTSINRHS PKPAUTMKNT. 
Hkkbk.ki I.. Okkh "21. Business M»n»»er 

Kvkkitt C.FMHOMll Advertising Manaster 
Chaki ks A. Hi < k tJ Circulation Manager 

MVKOS li. Ml HKAV '22 

Hol.OKN WlllTTAKEU '23 

OWEN K. KoI.SOM "28 



REV. J. H. RANDALL TO 
PREACH AT SUNDAY CHAPEL 

Heverend John Herman Handall of 
WW York City, is to address Aggie 
Students at Chapel next Sunday morn- 
ing. Hev. Mr. Handall was graduated 
from Colj-ate University in 18!>2 and 
ordained in the Baptist ministry in 1896. 
Besides being a capable preacher he is 
known as the author of a number of 
books on philosophy and religion. He 
is now minister of the Community 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Church in New York City. This church 
is famous throughout the contry be- 
cause it is one of the few churches 
which welcome |tO its membership 
people of all reliuious beliefs, all creeds 
and all nat tonalities. We can count on 
an interesting and timely talk from 
Mr. Handall. 



ON TO SPRINGFIELD 



Subscription $'2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered an •econdclaM matter at the Amherst 
Post Offlre. Arretted for mailing at special 
r«te of taomsjs saw fded for in section HOT. Art 
of October. 1J17 authorized August 20. 1»18. 



We're From Missouri. 

Annually, at this time of year, ju>t 
before Annie's clash with Springfield, 
we hear a lot of talk about what our 
nearby rivals have done all season in 
the way of gridiron accomplishment ; 
ot what the Mamon and White has not 
done, and vice-versa. 

As to the value of football dope, we 
are to say the least, skeptical, and 
you would-be prophets take a look at 
the results of past years and think over 
the following: Back in the days when 
Springfield had that wonderful team, 
when ' Cap" Sermon, probably the 
greatest back that ever wore the Bed 
and White, and "Breezy" Oale and a 
host of others were makinu gridiron 
fame for Coach Berry, they didn't suc- 
ceed in turninu out a team that could 
beat a "lighlinj; Aj-gie eleven" and 
what's more the "Y" boys are not going 
to begin next Saturday. 

They may be food but they've get to 

show us. 
On to 8pringfM4. 

COMMUNICATION 

To TIIK KlMTOK OK nOt C'OI.I.KOIAN : 

The Amherst Woman's Club wishes 
to express its appreciation to the musi- 
cians of M. A. C, who so generously 
contributed their services on Monday 

evening, Nov. 1. 

Mus. N. C (Ikttkli.. 



Wkdnkhhay, Novkmiiku 10. 

7-00 p. m.- Mandolin Club Rehearsal 
Stock bridge Hall, Hoom 114. 
7-30 P. M.— Animal Husbandry Club 
Meeting, Grinnell Arena. 
T B P — P AT, Novkmiiku 11. 
7-00 v. *.— Band Hehearsal, Social 

t ninti Booms. 
I'M) i\ m.— Glee Club Hehearsal, Boom 

114, Stockbridge Hall. 
7-30 p. M.— Landscape Club Meeting, 
Wilder Hall. 
FltlO.VY, Novkmiiku 12. 
f-40 a. M. — Chapel. 
8-00 i\ m.— Mass Meeting. 

Satikpav, Novkmiiku IS. 
11-20 v. m.— Special train leaves B. A 

M. Station for Springlleld. 
11-00 p. m.— Football, M.A.C. vs.Spring- 
tield Y. M. C. A. College, at 
Springfield. 

SlM»AV, NoVKMKKK 14. 

0-10 a. m.— Chapel. Speaker, Hev. John 
Herman Handall, The Com- 
munity Church, New York 
City. 

10-00 v. m. Class Pictures on Stock- 
Hall steps. 

MoMlAY, NoVKMIlKK IB, 

7-40 a. m.— Chapel. 

H-M) P. m. — Mandolin Club Rehearsal. 
Stockbridne Hall, Boom 114. 

Tikhday, Novkmiiku 10. 
7-00 !•. m.— Senate Meeting.OldChapel. 
MQ P. m— Olee Club Hehearsal. 
Stockbridge Hall, Koom 114. 

7-30 P. M. -Homology Club Meeting 
French Hall, Koom F. 

WKI»NKSI>AY, NoVKMIIKH 17. 

3-00 P. m. — Assembly. Speaker, Mr 
(ieorge T. Powell, Brook field. 

4-00 p. m.— Sophomore Freshman Foot- 
ball Came. Alumni Field. 



OWN HALL 



Thursday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



William Fawsham in 
"The Han Who Lost Him- 
self." a startling new story 

of an American's strange ex- 
perience when lie met Ills 
double In KmrMsh aristocracy. 



Pathe News 
Comedy 



Topics 
Mutt and Jeff 



Friday- 
Hat, at 3 

E vo. at 8 

Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eva. 2 shows 

6-45. 8-30 



Monday 



Hat. at 3 
Eva. at 8 



The year w most StaMBdoBS 
■ •induction. FriscUla Dean in 
"The Virgin of Stamboul." 

A great hiu' production with a 
tli rilling story that will spread 
like wildfire Laid in Turkey. 

Scenic reel 2-reel Comedy 

Tarn Mix in "The Dare- 
devil," the romance of a 
bard-boiled tenderfoot The 

moat thrilling, fast moving 
picture he has starred in. 

" Hidden Dangers" serial. 
News Comedy 

Ethel Clayton and Harri- 
son Ford in " Young' Mrs. 
Winthrop." from the stage 
play. A real drama of the 
home, it affords unusual en- 
tertainment and an ahun- 
dance of heart interest. 

The He Havens In "Moving 
Hay," 2-reel Comedy 

Fatbe Review 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing and Printing 

Hills Studio Phone 456-R 



UNITY CHURCH 

HENRY G. IVES, Minister 

Invites you to its home life. 

Come and get acquainted. 

No creedal tests. 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real Bargains iu 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SALE! 
A too Expert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. On your way up town. 



SUNDAY PREACHING SERVICE, 
10-45 A. M. 

SONG AND PICTURE SERVICE, 
7-30 P. M. 



PROF. JONES RESIGNS 

FROM M. A. C. FACULTY 

M. A. C. is to lose another of her pro- 
fessors Friday when Karl Jones, M. Sc. 
Agr , leaves for Ohio. He has accepted 
a position in the Farm Crops Depart- 
ment of the Extension Service at Ohio 

State 1'niversity. 

Prol. .lones was brought up in Ohio 
and Wee graduated from the State 1'ni- 
versiiv in IMS. He spent one year 
there as a P. &., before gotne; •» Maine, 
where he tirst entered the teaching pro- 
fession, la the Agronomy Department 
of the University of Maine he remained 
for a period of two years, coming to M. 
A. C. iu August, 1915. 



ALUMNI COMMITTEE 

DISCUSSES SHORT COURSE 

The Executive Commit tee of the Asso- 
ciate Alumni held a meeting in the 
Alumni Office on Tuesday afternoon, 
Nov. I, at which Director Haskell, Dr. 
Tuckerman, Dr. Peters, Professors Os- 
mun, Parker, MacDougal, and Mr. 
Campbell were present. 

Numerous important business matters 
were taken up and in regard to the 
petition of the short course it was 
voted to have the chairman appoint a 
committee of three, one of whom would 
he himself, to make a study of the short 
course problem with the view of being 
able to pass more intelligently on the 
petition of the short course alumni to 
be affiliated with the Associate Alumni, 
and report at a future meeting of the 
committee. It was also voted to make 
recommendations to the Trustees 
through the President that living mem- 
bers of the class of 1871 be reissued di- 
plomas in the form of golden diplomas 
as part of the semi-centennial celebra- 
tion program. The next meeting will 
be held in the Alumni Office on Nov. 
19. 





A bull's eye for Value ! 

A Rogers Peet suit or over- 
coat. 

Moneyback if you can do 
better. 

Fine furnishing*, hats and shoes, too. 

Rogers Pert Company 



Broadway 
at 13th St. 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 



Broadway 
at 34th St. 



Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren »* 4l8t 8t - 

NEW YORK CITY 



61 LAVAL 

Cream 

SEPARATORS 

The best of all 
dairy investments. 
Save $15 to $20 
per cow every year. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

IBS Broadway, Maw York 
29 E. MadlaonSt., Chicago 

50,000 BRANCHES AND LOCAl 
AGENCIES THE WORLD OVER 





A T0GGE1Y- 






SEVENTY-FIVE COUPLE 

AT FIRST INFORMAL 



Dance After the Game Commences 
Season's Socials. 

Following thetiame last Saturday the 
lirsl informal of the year was held in 
the Drill Hall. Dancing commenced at 
.". o'clock and lasted until 0-lfi wiihan 
hour's intermission for supper at Dra- 
per Hall. 

The usual quota of uirls were present 
from Mt. Holyoke, Smith ami Amherst. 
Those coming from Smith were forced 
to leave earlier than the others in com- 
pliance with the rules of that college. 
Ml were on hand early thong h to see 
1 lie Rhode Island Slate game. 

The dance order compiled H dames 
some of which had to be) omitted be- 
I ause of the late hour al which (he 
dance commenced. Music was fur- 
nished by the college orchestra and was 
full of pep throughout the evening. 

The decorations, in charge of Waugh, 
Thompson and Moody weie much as 
usual and consisted of potted palms in 
ihecorners ami at intervals along I he 
Sides, banners and pennants on the 
walls, and a screen ot palms about the 
orchestra. A punch howl at one side 
received constant attention all the 

evening. 

The supper, served al the dining hall 
consisted of cocktail, chicken eroqueta, 
KTeei peas, French dressed potStOM, 
rolls, cherry sundae, cake and demi- 
tasse. 

The chaperons Were Miss Pease. Mt. 

Holyoke, Mrs. Bach racb, Amherst: ami 

Mrs. Shock, Smith. 

Y. M- C. A. SPEAKER IN 

MORNING CHAPEL 

Mr. Campbell Later Addresses Mis- 
sionary Meeting. 

The speaker al Monday morning 
chapel was Fay Campbell an ardent V. 
M ('. A. worker. lie spoke of the 
wonderful work that the Student Vol- 
unteer Movement was doing in foreign 
'it-Ids. He brought concrete evidence 
11 the presentation of the testimonies 
ketyrian, Japanese and Negro stu- 
dents, who have taken the Christian re- 
ligion and profited thereby. He spoke 
■minions in China and Turkey and 
what the unselfish and sincere work of 
""ir missionaries basaccomplished. He 
lend a plea for more young men and 
MB to enter this field since there 
so desperate a need for their service. 
I lie Y. M. C. A. conducted a mil 
meeting for all those interested, in 
'lie social union room Monday evening 
40 ml which Mr. Campbell, who was 
<st year secretary of the Y.M.CA. 
lenl Volunteer Movement of Vale 
' Hege also spoke. About BO students 
"•led. After a hymn and prayer, 
Campbell spoke 1"> minutes on the 
" of a Heal Christian Spirit. He 
lie urged no one to become a mis- 
iiy but he did urge everyone to be 
iistian. 
interviews, mostly personal, were 
■with Mr. Campbell all day Ttie>- 
Rtnntng at B-tfJ \ m., for 16 mln- 
eaeb. 



AGGIE MEN BRING 

HOME TWO TROPHIES 

Rate Well Up at the New England 
Fruit Show. 

M (he New England Fruit Show Sai- 

urdaj . Nov. «i. Aggie men had an oppor- 
tunity to prove that in agricultural 
training our college U second to none in 
New England. 

The (few England Fruit Growers w-o- 
eiation, following a custom Interrupted 
by the war. offered two silver cups to be 

awarded to the learns winning Iheliisi 
place in the \pplc Packing end \pple 
Judging contest, field in connection 

U il h I he Fruit Show. 

Itolh learns weie composed of Aggie 

Seniors majoring iu P ology, Peck, 

1. eei. and Howe comprising the pack- 
ing team, while Ihe lineup for Ibe jud- 
lag contest was Knight. I.ambei I , ami 
Mallon. 

Howe made lirsl place in both the bar- 
rel and box packing, which pin the 
team In the lead, while I'cck and 1. eel 
scored high. 

hi the frail judging Rhode Inland 
had high man. while [Mai Ion, Lam- 
bert, and Knight walked off wit 1 1 -> •<■■ 
ond, third and fourth plncea respec- 
tively, making Ihe team an easy winner. 

Much ciedit for the Showing made is 
due ProfesSOl Sears Who exercised gen- 
eral supervision over ihe training, nnd 
to Prof easoi Drain and Mr. Gould who 

coached I he team. 



LIST OF TENTATIVE GLEE 
CLUB MEMBERS ANNOUNCED 



First Concert Will Be at Hadley 
Early in December. 
A permanent list of the members "I 

the Glee Club has not been decided 

upon as yet, bat from time to time a 

list of I hose who are to OS retained will 
i be published. 'The follow tag list in- 
cludes those who have, to date, been 

accepted : 

Seniors: Lincoln. I;. L. Starkey, Mar- 
I tin, Sloane. D. C Douglass, (iott. Caaclo, 

Newton. 1:. D. Baker, F. s. Fletcher. E. 
M. Bantam; juniors, H. W. Spring. I). 
H. Smith, Martin. K. \V. Moody, l.i\ 

sian, Burnett, Blakeley, Burnfaam, 
Bolman, Vinton, Bneaell ; sophomores, 
Broderick, Keith, L B. Arlington. 
Scare, Blade, Faneuf, Richards, 5for 

cross, Whitlier: freshmen, Dubois. 

Loath, Staebner, Williams. Sainton 

and Hutehins. Wendell. '2:!, is now 
pianist and Howard Qoff, 11, elub 
leader' 

The tn-t irip will come during the 

I second week in December, when the 

clubs will give a concert at Hadley. 

The schedule ol succeeding trips is not 

yet definite, but the annual trip during 

the Christmas raeatlon will probably 
start earlj In the week, if not on the 

Friday preceding. According to I'to- 
feSSOI liigelow. who has coached the 
clubs from time to time during the past 

veais. 1 be present club hat material 

which will produce an unusually suc- 
cess! ul season. 

Bx-'Jl.— Miller is now a .Innior in 

Colombia University 



THREE FRESHMEN FEATURE 

IN SECOND POND PARTY 

l.asl Friday was an idea' day tor Ihe 

sci I pond party Of the season, which 

was held directly after dinner, wilh 

Cromack, Loathe, and (lark of the 
Freshman class as the principal enter- 
tainers, 'Tin- new plattorm buill at the 
north end of the pond added much to 
t he occasion, for by dim ol I ha extra 
height the Freshmen were given s much 
better conception of what a correct 

pond parly should be. 

Flaying a brass drum and symbols, 

1 in* three prisoners weii- solemnly 

paroled from North College to ihe 
pond by a group of Sophomore escorts. 

1 romack, convicted of walking wilh co- 
eds, was the liist lo hit the waler and 

si ir up 1 be mud. after mneb persua- 
sion Cromack admitted bis gmli Next 

in order came I, eat he, who was lirsl 

gives 1 chance to try out his sing- 
ing Sbilltj across the pond. lie was 
Called back after one ducking, ami 
iu mournful lones rendered I hat old 
dltt] : 

"How dry I am 

How dry I am 

Nobody knows 

< >r gives a ." 

The last man, Clark, was found guilty 
of not jumping It's and of DOl wearing 
Iks Freshman hat, both major offense*. 
However, mil ol pity lor the poor lis fa 
(in the pond) he was thrown In only 
once and allowed to go free. 



'I'll. William L, Dowd of North Am- 
herst is on the campus ibis year as In- 
structor iu Insect PestS, 



ONCE MORE THE AGGIE 

BAND WILL LEAD US 

Under the leadership of Cornethrl 
Bay Swift *9f{ the college band has re- 
cently been reorganised and is now 
under full swing towards a successful 
season. At present there are 20 mem 

hers in ihe organisation, and re hea r sa ls 

arc being held every Tuesday evening 
in Ihe Social Union BOOm, Any man 
whether a 4-year or a 2-year student, 
who is at all proficient wilh any band 

Instrument, is urgently invited to at- 
tend the rehearsals ami become a mem- 
ber of Ihe band. To induce the men to 
come out. and lo insure its success by 
regular attendance al rehearsals, Un- 
hand is being run on a credit basis this 
rear: i.e., each member receives one 
college credit pel teim.aiid is therebv 
allowed only a certain number of ab- 
sences 01 "cuts." 

I lie primary object of the band is, 
as it has always been, lo promote col- 
lege spirit, and His hoped that it can 
become as important a college organiza- 
tion as it was in previous years. Il 

made a very good showing af the foot- 
ball gameoa last Saturday, and il lias 
assured the student body thai it 
will bad them through Ibe streets ol 
Springfield on Nov. IS, 



Holders of Ihe I'niled Slates J '/, Lib- 
erty llotnls of the Second Issue should 
convert In fore Nov. 16, and holders of 
Firs! Issue 4% bonds before Dec if, 
Which are the last days of" grace for con- 
version inlo4|% bonds of Ihe respective 

issues. Failure to exchange will reeuli 

la loss of market value. 



S. S. HYDE 

Ogstloleaaa sassil j**xv *»!»»• 

B I'lriiHiint Street U|. nne lliulil . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

I'uiiy Ossisnmei 

M. Novick & A.Warren 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prom ply done. 
Woik called lor and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



10 Plensant St. Tel. 9 J 

i ..i mil ly ColomMs fad- 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 192-4 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amliersf - - Mass. 



3/cityCc/iovati/Ki 

Jttc/£/ove 

and^ 




'oc CYcii/im</ 
ISjfmtteJt 



s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



\ 



The Maasachueette Collegia, Wedneaday, November 10^920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 10, 1920. 



I WONDER 



Why I go down town Sunday night for supper when here is an 
named, owned and operated place right on campus? 
AGGIE INN SUNDAY NIGHT SUPPER S-30 



7-30 



RHODE ISLAND GAME 

« niitiniieit from pane, 1] 



VH la the enemy territory tbe wmaln- 

,!,.,• „» die period. Aggie ,wu ' e i'» u " l,,,, >* 
through to the It. I 2o yard line, to lose 
,| H . l.all nn.l have Johnson punt out ol 
,,.,„,.,.,, Uol'.ll yi.nl Ui»in through 

tacble wd PW»»«*« 1« >'""' sn,:isl1 
through center were bright apoti la »»e 
II. AC. play here. 

peeing the usual stone wall defeoee. 
K I wan forced to puut at the opening 
„,• ,,„. S(M ,„h| quarter, for sfaaea. 

ehuselts. Collins kicked OB the fourth 

dowa. l'oi u. I., Oardaai got biobbo" 
right aad tor 11 r«*BB. iU,a ""'" * f,eT 

l«„ line plays had failed to gain. .lohn- 

s,,n kicked to Tarplla, who raa the 

kick hack [4 yanls to midfield. Oolllat 
ntaroed tba klak. Aft.r three plays 
had naine.1 scarcely three yards Johnson 
punted.Tarpr.n tunning the hall lack 

HjardatotbeBlaeaad Wblie la-yard 

li„ e Kn.ni here three Hue plays and a 

forward that netted IS yard! bro««ht 

.he hall to the K. I. eight yard line, 
on the third down Lent went through 
f „r the touchdown, Pooia kleblaf tbe 

,0.1. Score. It. 1.7. M . A. C. 7. P»Bti 

were exchanged during the re.na.nde, 
of the period. 

Johnson's punt at the opening ol the 
third Muarter was run hack to the 
M A c. 40 yard mark Collins 
un tbe fourth down punted to 
,he visitors lS-yard line- K. l.heiv da- 
velopad their only consistent offense ot 
Ihe game, cam log the hall to Aggie ■ 
M yard line, where they lost it OB 

knrat »■ «'" (1 "»■ a,ul ******** : "" 

OOBBtcd f©tl« yards of K. l.'l B.lvam-e. 
ColllBi pBBted and Cap.. Kastwood s 
t .,even started an ort'ense that Betted 
then. 1H yards hefore they lost the ball 
M d0WN, An exchange of punt, e.uled 

the period. 

Starting the laat .pinner M. A. 
rushed the hall S5 yanls to Ithodys » 

vard HBO, where it was lost on an lB* 
eomptatad forward pass. Macintosh 
,, r „ke tbroWgfc *** 1-locke.l Johnsons 
!lU e,np.ed drop kick, hut the Hlue and 
While recovered, tried an unsuceessi U I 

forward paaaaad then kicked. An a»- 
ghanga ol punts, followed hy a run 
haeb of 80 yards by Tarplla, brought 

lh- hall to Aggo-s- 47-yard line. In 

thairlaet attampt toaeora.Aggleroahed 

,he ball io their opponents :i-yard line, 

lo , lBg it on an laeompleted forward 

,, :lss ; ,.,,.. and Poole teat ..red in . his 
.ulvance.thetor.ncr twice slipping oil 
ta ,kle for a total of 15 yards, wlnle 
••<.»p- hanged through the center of 
the line for the same distance. The 
BHM ended here with the hall la 
, m8 essh.n of K.I. far down in their own 

territory. 
K i„ lf poola aad TarpliB played atellar 

fooiballforll.A.CaBdtbeallaroaad 

work of Johnson featured for 15. I. 
The lineup: 



Seore-M. A. C. 7, K. 1.7. Touch- 
downs— Lent, Totinan. Uoals from 
touchdown I'oole Johnson. .s.tbsli- 
miions- M. A. 0., Tarplla lor Sargent, 
8rey for Cascio. Davenport for Hrigham, 
Kreeinan for Davenport. Koser for (Hay, 
son; K. I.. C. Noid.piist for Totinan, l.a- 

Bree lor Coyae, Howrey lor 0. Word- 

,,utsi.M.-Alcvy for Noid.piist. Keferee— 
Carpaoterof Harvard. linpire— Lowe 
Of Dartmouth. Bead linesman Ken- 
nedy of \inlierst . 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 



Shoe 
Repairing 



Shorn 

Shine 



T. MIENTKAS 

ruv— 
C. H. GOULD 

for first -class 



Our Bread 
R0II5 and 
Pastry 



Just till the oap between 
aupper and breakfast. 



SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

When Cap.* I'oole hooted Ihe hall 
Boron tbe bar last Saturday, it made 
his thirteenth consecutive Kilccessllll 
goal this year. I'oole is the leading 
scorer, too. 

According to the law s ot progressions. 
we win this week. First a defeat, then 

a tie. and then . 

Someone ought 10 d»b Tarplin, 
"MOUBS". He surely reminded one ol 
the diminutive animal running through 
a crowded parlor, when he darled 
through the heavy "Bbodle" line, with 
all the guards and tackles making iir 
ctiectuai graba at him. 

"Father" Lent surely fools em. He 
stands there kind ..easy like, hut when 
tbej try to start something, O, hoy! 

They ought to make a rule forbid- 
ding white boreef oa tbe highway at 

the same time as the cross-country 
team. 



Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing \fr/. B . DRURY 

V.\ Pleasant St.. Amherst. Mass. 



F. M- THOMPSON & SON 

GOOD CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN 

Leather Coats 

Corduroy Vests 

Guyer Hats 

Hart Schaffner and Marx Clothes 



FRESH-SOPH GAME TO 

BE PLAYED NOV. 17 



Sophomores 



Favorites 
Contest. 



in Numeral 




M. V. « 

Gray bob, re 

King, rt 
Brig ham. rg 

Macintosh. « 

Ifobor, lg 

Cotton, H 
Caaeio, le 
I'oole, t|l» 
Lent,lhh 
Sargent, rhh 
Collins, fb V 



a. 1. ei mi 

le. T(»tnian 

H, Noid.piist 

|g, Connors 

c Potter 

rg, Kastwood 

rt, Terry 

re. Haslani 

(|h, Heck 

rhh. Coyne 

lhh. Ghwdaai 

fb, Johnson 



Tii,' annual Freshman-Sophomore 

football game will be held after Aaataa* 

hl| on Wednesday. No\. 17. 

The Sophomore team h;.s begttB prac- 
ticing and ahout SO men have turneil 
out. Among these are llilyard. Davis. 
gad Bobcro, hacks on last veal's Fresh- 
mat- team. who. with Karl Williams, 
former Deert.eld Academy .|i«arterhack , 
will make a hard coinhinal ion for the 
Freshmen to stop. •Connie"* Wirth at 
end and Hardy a( center were also 
incml.ers ot their Freshmen s.|iiad. 
Bnrbeek appears aide to take care ol 
the othei end in good shape, and there 
are aereral candidates for the line poai- 
tions. There is also the possibility that 
some men now on the varsity s<|iiad will 
be aide to play. 

The Freshman team is more of a 
known qaeetlty than the Sophomore 

aggregatloa. While it baa not shown 

any great strength in its uames thus far 
il lias the advantage of having had reg- 
ular coaching and pracMce as a team. 
This should count much in the numeral 
name. The team will bap a good line 
with Wilhelm, Staehner. Myrick, aad I 
Salmon, and a versatile hacktiehl with j 
Williams, a hard line plunger, and 
I Kilski and Tewbill who have been con- 
| sistent gainers on end runs and tackle 

1 plays. 

The Sophomores are the general fav- 
orites around the campus and look to 
be the strongest team, though the 
Freshmen will not accede to their 
claims and are loyally backing up their 
own team. 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 



mma. u. ». »»at. or». 



Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business fanner's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be dad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C. Desk 

The Coc-Mortimcr Company 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE 



• • • 



DROP IN PRICES 

We have been able to obtain some stock at lower prices and now announce 
reductions in prices of paper and notebooks averaging more than 20 per cent. 

REMEMBER US WHEN BUYING 



CO-EDS OCCUPY ADAMS HALL 

At last the patient co-eds are installed 
in their new quarters. Ao official mov- 
ing day was held last Saturday Nov. fj, 
:itid now the girls aie settled ami enjoy- 
ing the comforts of the Abigail Adams 
House. This being I tie first week of 
the occupancy of the house the girls 
aie being serenaded early in the morn- 
ing for a period of 15 minutes by tbi 
talented Freshmen co-eds. This assures 
the immediate rising of every girl. 

It is rumored that "moving day'' was 
ijiiite an ordeal for all eooceraed. Lines 
ol girls carrying four or live hats on one 
arm and various pataphanalia on the 
other, were seen timing back and forth 
from Draper to the "Abbey" all day. 
Trunks persisted in getting mixed upaml 
everything got in the other "fellows" 
room. Those paper box carriers would 
persist in breaking and the path be* 
twaaa was strewn with stray article*. 
However this is probably the only iuov- 
ing day Aggie will see for a long time 
bo cheer up, girls. 



ASSEMBLY 

l< Ontlnued from |uil'<- l! 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 

CANDIDATES CALLED OUT 

Varsity basketball practise was 
itarted Monday night in I tit* Drill Hall. 
Hereafter. M Monday. Wednesday, and 
Friday nights candidates will be coached 
under the dire, lion of Captain Howdy. 
The prospects for a successlul season 
are the best in the history of the college 
with four,'M" men hack. The sched- 
ule will he ready for publication in the 
mar future. 

Those reporting for practice are: Gap* 
taiaGowdy '22, A. Smith '22, Thompson 
-.', Hall '21, Armstrong '21, Baker '21, 
McArdle '22, Hooper '22, Kan.lall'22, 
Bale '23, Alexander II, Hunter - 2:i. 
Many basketball players are expected 
to report at the close of the football 
-oil, including Lent '21, Kroeck '22. 
Koser '22, Lewandowski "22, Marshiuan 
Tumey ft, (irayson '23, Heal ft. 
Ihe assistant managers litis year 
Freeman '22 and Walsh '22, while 
it in the Sophomore class Dow.len. 
Kolsoin, Tisdale, and llilyard are com- 
peting for the jassistant managers' 
I usition. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Society of American Field Ser- 

Fellowsbips for French Universities 

will offer open competition among grad- 

- of American Colleges and other 

BUitable (|iialiried candidates a number 

llowships, not to exceed 2r>, for the 

]"ii pose of encouraging advanced study 

and research in French Universities 

tig 1921-22. These fellowships of 

innual value of $200 are granted for 

vear and are renewable for the BOB* 

aar. 

her information may be secured 
the I'residents's Office. 



1 A. Hurd '21 was married to Miss 

B F. (iardner of Hanover, Sat. 

Oct. :'.() at 2-00 p.m., in the M.K. church, 

\''iberst. Uev. Johnson officiated at 

the wedding. A double ring service 

used. Mr. and Mrs. O. K. Hurd 

ded the bride and bridegroom re- 

'ively. Mr. Hurd wants it to be 

ttoed that it was a strictly private 

[lag. 



somewhere. is making millions. 

Statistics show that a man's successor 
failure is not due to the line of busilie*s 
he pursues, hut to his ability or lack of 
ability. From statistics we also lean, 
that \ei> tew ot the captains of indus- 
try today are sons ol bankers or mil- 
lionaires. Almost without exception 
they come from the coiintn farmer ami 
the country minister. The reason is 

clear, [a order to gel along they bare 

had to develop thrill, that fundamental 
basis of all success. I'ick out the em- 
ployer and the wage-earner^: the 
former base s.ived mone\ systemati- 
cally, t he latter have not. 

Mr. Baboon compared success to a 
six-e\ limler engine, composed ol Ihe 
live Is, and, most important of all, 
thrift. All that we have today la din- 
to somebody's thrift at some lime. Il 
may, then, be considered as the divid- 
ing line between barbarism and civili- 
zation. 

2. Industry, hard, steady work, is 
essential to success, and is eloaelj 
linked up with thrift. But this is of 

IIO Use unless i ollplcd wit II 

:'.. Integrity, the brother ol civiliza- 
tion, on which its enliie structure is 
founded. Integrity applies alike to 
nation and individual. 

4. Initii.tise is to MCeaM what gas- 
oline is to the engine. Fulton. Kdison 
and other great men succeeded because 
they saw things before the other fellow 

did. 

'>. Iuteiisiveness, or specialization, 
assures success, just as the harmless 
sun-rays, focused through a lens, are 
concentrated to give great heat. 

5. Interest . the last cylinder, is one 
of the most Important; for whether a 
man is a success or failure depends 
larg.Tv upon the amount of interest he 
lakes in his work. Il is inseparably 
bound up with habit, for by continually 
doing a tiling, we understand it belter 
and it becomes ...ore interesting. 

How shall we develop t beat ill cylin- 
ders of success.' Rich, damp soil and 
plBBty of sunshine are necessary to good 
plant growth of any sort. Qood health, 
in this case, is ihe damp soil; a per- 
son's ambit ion and his health are very 
intimately related. Just as a plant 
needs sunshine, so a- person needs re- 
ligion. 

By tigures we find that at birth 
a child lives 100% hy instinct 

At 5 oears of age, gfl% instinct, 4% 
religion and 1% intellect. 

At college age, ~~>l bmtlBet, 20% 

religion and ">% intellect. 

Fvett the ablest men in the country 
live 6O J / by instinct, :t(>% by religion. 
and only 10% bj intellect. We may not 
control t tie instinct, aud we may not 
alwayscontrol the intellect, hut the one 
great factor we can control is thc:io 
religion, and this we must do if we are 
to gaiii lasting sue. ess. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Colics* Jswslry <ult l.lnk*., Hoft . ollar I'tim. 
menu Suit leav Violin, iiaiiju. Mandolin Strings 

Fins Watch Repairing, also Broken Lenses 

Keplaeed I'loinntly. 

32 Main Street, Amherst, Mass. 



WRKJLI 

5 at a PKtaea 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



Before the War 

package 

During the Warl 



5 



C a paefcaet 



NOW! 1 



The Flavor Lasts 
iSo Does tbe Prlcel 



PLAZA 

Northern pine . . Ma««. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

a/bete tee bbbi 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Arc eaewB. 

Program changed daily sicspt Monday 

and Tuesday. 

IKKI.'K P. HKI.MnM. MseafST. 




Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



A $500 Stock of College Banners and Pennants 

TO BE SOLD AT COST 

See me belore you buy — Where U buy the paper. 

TASK, 12 North 

AMHERST LAUNDRY 

Has just installed a new machine. Hie latest " I'lospei it v Ou e O BB Body Press" for 
shirts. This presses the entire front and around the neck at one time, saving 
\\i ar and giving the shirl a uniform smooth linish. 
< ili/ens ol Amherst cordially invited to visit the Laundry and see it in operation. 



•JO. -Arthur II. Holder, who was a 

graduate student in Landscape Harden- 
ing last year baa taken up landscape 
work with BOOB 4 Hat 'h.golf specialists. 
He has established his ollice at 
Amherst. 



ON TO SPRINGFIELD 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, lilC. Northampton, Mass. 

An oi.tirai nini|i srbtefa m s nsf s up t<> the j our Art Pepertstspt is killed wiiti ptetnras 

highest standard of modern serrtee. v<m I snltsble for the dacoretlon of "f ra* M houses. 

i. in n-iy on ooi skin ami irooil taste In all h or (or birthday and trsddinK gifts. Greeting 

optical matters. II] cards for particular people. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

„ Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 10, 1920. 



PREREQUISITES FOR SUCCESS 
IN THE BUSINESS WORLD 
The following article from tbe Han 

York 7V///c.s is ;i verbatiiui excerpt from 
:im address by Charles If, Schwab to (lit; 
l'lincelon sliulciit bod J, and seems win 

well adapted to reprinting here: 
"My Idea of aaaeoeaafiil Ufa is tbe 

man who has successfully accomplished 

t lie objects for which he set out : to do 
eOfltethlag that is worthy of a rial 
Ameriean man. Money in not the 
measure. Tbe thing you want to do is 
to make ii|> yoiii mind what you are go- 
ing to drive for and lei nothing ataad In 
the way of its ultimate accomplishment. 

First of all thinys la Integrity— unim- 
peachable Integrity. 

'Ton can make up your mind to do 
one of two t hlnga : you can have a "good 
time" or you can have a successful 
life, but you can't have both. Make 
your employer feel truthfully that yoo 
are sincere with him; thai you are gO- 
leg to promote his interests; that you 
are going to stand for lha ihlagathat 

he represents, — loyalty above all. 

'"It doesn't pay to make enemies.— 
Concentrate and think upon a problem 
in mind until you have reached ■ satis- 
factory conclusion in your own mind, 
then *ro ahead even If you do make a 
mistake. 

"The worst thing that can happen to 
a man is to start life with influence. 
He will have to work twice as hard to 
prove iiis Merita. Dob'I Imagine that 
because you have a college diploma 
that you arc on a different plane from 
other men. boys from universities 
have got tO learn; and they are learn- 
ing it fast, that men are not men be- 
cause they arc rich or because of high 
social position or because of influence, 
men are men because of the true in- 
stincts of men. N'o man can be success- 



ful at work, if he doesn't And the work 
be has to do pleasant. Determination, 
llyalty. Integrity, and stick-to-it-iveness 

will bring bappineae and prosperity to 

you all." 



CAMPUS NOTES 



ON TO SPRINGFIELD 



Get the Habit 

I. M. LABRO VITZ 

The Leading Tailor and 

Gen Is* Fu rn ish mg» 

— Full Dress Suits to Kent — 

Clothes ■ponged and pressed by 

Hoffman Machine 

Our Work fa Guaranteed, 

Come and open an account with me. 
Phone 302-W 

11 Amity 8t. t Amherst, Muss. 



Professor John l'helan's new book. 

"Beadiagi la Band Boeiolo*y H ta bale* 

brought out by MacMillan and Co. 

The bead of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment in consultation with the College 

architect, J. U Ritchie, !■ busy draw- 
ing plane for a oewf chemistry laboratory. 
A very Interacting meeting was held 
Tneadey evening, Nov. Snd, la French 

Hall by the Pomology Club. A talk 

vie given to the clubby Dr. Shaw, of 

the Kx penmen! Station. 

The compilnient of war service records 
which the president's office has in 
preparation will in all probablity be 
delayed until spring. The book will 

be a complete record oi the wartime 

activities of A^gie men. 

Mandolin Club rehearsals are now be- 

Ing held twice a week in BtOCkbridgC 

Hall. The dab la progreaalng rapidly 

anil will give a good showing at the 
first Concert which will be held im- 
mediately after Thanksgiving in 
lladley. 

The college has recently obtained 
poeanaaii t the insect eollectb I the 

late I.. W. Qoodell of 1'ansy Park. The 
collection will augment that of the De- 
part iiient of Bntomology which is 
already the most complete in the 
country and probably in t lie world. 

Connecticut lias adopted a daylight 
saving plan of its own. Since the 
earlier arrival of nightfall, the faculty 
has voted to run all classes.starting < »<•(. 
2S, an hour early. until the Thanksgiving 
receaa. This was done to benefit the 
football team and interclass activities. 

A very successful Wax Tread was 
held last Friday evening in the Drill 
Hall. About 21H) of Ihe students were 
present and put forth fheir best efforts 

io prepare toe leer f«»r the affair to 

follow the next day. Peppy music was 
furnished by a nine piece orchestra and 
dancing was in order from 1-M to 11-00. 
Through the kindness of Colonel 
Walker, who is granting; the use of the 
horses and furnishing instruction from 
the Military Department, the Co-eds 
are enjoying riding lessons as a part of 
the course in Physical Education. 
Several of the girls are already expert 
horsewomen and the entire group is 
developing fast under their corps of 



instructors. Needless to say "Fi/.zie 
Ed" is now one of the most popular 
courses on the campus. 

The Animal Husbandry Club had an 
interesting meeting in Stockbridge 
Hall last Wednesday evening, Nov. :\. 

j. 0. McNutt, former Profeeaot and 

Head of the Department of Animal 
Husbandry at M. A. C, spoke on "'The 
Opportunities in Animal Husbandry 
Associations". Professor Salsbury, pres- 
ent head of the department, gave an 
interesting talk on the work of the 
Saddle and Sirloin Club of the Ohio 
State College of Agriculture. Eighty 
members of the Club were present. 
The next meeting will be a business 
meeting and will be held tonight in 

the Grinnell Arena. 



Moses To, <:. A. Iluntingloii To. H. 
Brewer, '14, D.C. Caada li, ■roaatS, 

Clark '14. 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

CATKKlMi TOM 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At FKATKKN1TIES KVKKV NKiHT 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



ALUMNI 



KINGSLEY'S 



The following alumni were seen at 
ihe game and informal last Sat unlay : 
Bene Hi hard 'it), Bed Doabj '» and 

Hob Home "20. 

The M. A. C. elub of New York only 

in, els once a year so the following have 

decided to get together ai least once a 

month for an old fashioned test and 
smoke talk: Lyons, Maples, Holloway, 
(.raves, Quadlaed, Crowe lieadio and 
Oppc '80. 

'1)5. — Fifteen years absence has not 
made A. Kusscll l'aul lose interest in 
his Alma Mater, in a recent letter to 
Professor Haines he states I hat he is 
very much interested in the fine 
football team that Aggie can boast this 
year. He has watched its progress and 
thinks the scores excellent. At Aggie 
fairs throughout the country he has met 
I large numbeJ of Aggie alumni. 

'17_U. \. Boetroaa has full charge 
of Gardening and Fruit growing at the 
Norfolk County Agricultural School, 
W'alpole, Mass. 

TH.— T. H. Reuman, is connected 

with the Leominster High School in the 

Department of Agricultural Education. 

IS. Mr. and Mrs. William Theodore 

Boofnaglc oi Oleeridge, N. .1.. announce 

the engagement of their daughter Kath- 
eriue Woolen Boofnaglc to Forrest San- 
bury Hence of Pateraon, X. J. 

'20. — A. A. dough was on the campus 
a few days this week. 

Some of the alumni who were back 
for the New Hampshire game were : 
••Hob'' Skinner '20, "Dick" Smith '17, 
Carl (iurshin '17, Merrill Warner 17, 
Oliver ti. Pratt '18, Marshall Lauphear 
T8, "Steve" Richardson 'IX, "Ed" 
Ha/en 14. "Knife" Russell 10, Charles 



Hotel Worthy 



Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

(Giva ui a trial/ 



We carry a fult line of 

Students' Appliances 

G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS AND CARPETS 

— K. D. MARSH K8TATK — 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



— AT 

Economy Prices 
E. M. 

The Shoeman. 
Main St., Amherst 



«« i 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 
Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

The Collegian, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 



Telephone 

G. M. Campbell, Ass't Sec. 175-J 
G. M. Campbell, Secretary 175 J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 



BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street, (Tel.415-W) Hadley. Mass. 



C. F. DYER 



F. P. Rand, Manager 
C. D. Kendall, President 
C. F. Clark, Manager 
Lorenzo Fuller, Manager 

F. A. Gilbert, Manager 
J. I). Evers, Manager 
C. W. Bunker, Manager 
L. P. Martin, Editor 

G. W. Fdman, Manager 
M. F. Webster, Editor 
Frederic Howard, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-one Index, C. D. Kendall, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 
Y M. C. A. Howard Goff President 



136-R 

280 
280 

8325 

8325 

416-M 

280 

8377 
280 

214 

832S 
280 

280 
8314 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, - Mat* 



—The— 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place for 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 



FOOTBALL NUMBER 



l< 








MOV 1 9 1 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 17, 1920. 



No. 7 




SPRINGFIELD OFFENSE 

OVERCOIKFS M. A. C. 



THE 1920 VARSITY 
Link- From hft to right 5 Grayson, re ; King, rt; L:iT..nr. rg j Mackintosh, c : alobor.lg; Cotton, It; Cueto.le, 

lUcKKiKi.D-Kroni left I.) liKht: Sargent. rlil»; Collins, lb; Poole (captain), qb; Lent. Ihb. 



TUFTS VS. M. A. C. SATURDAY 

M. A. O. TO1 M 

' im 10, le re, Liudell or Neils.m 

(otton, It rt, Vitta 

Moluir, lg rg. Thompson 

Mackintosh, t 0, Kusso 

Brig ham or Latour, rg lg, Colon 
Ki»g, rt It, (ialloway 

ii ray son, re le, Maceliin 

Pools (e»B4.) qb qb, LeCain 

Lent, Ihl. rbb, Martin 

sargent or Tarplin, rbb 

lbb, (eapt.) Keefe 
Collins, fb fb, Konloff or Jeffrey 



PRES. SPFARE SPEAKS 

AT WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 



MAROON AND WHITE 

DUE TO TRIM TUFTS 



Aggie Eleven Meets Old Rivals at 
Medford Saturday. 

The final football name of the season 
BatQldaf at Medford. with Tufts, proin- 
to be one of the most interesting 
•kittles that the two rivals have ever 
1 '''"tested. On the face of things Aggie 
■uldwin. Tbeorelically the Maroon 
While is superior to Tufts. We 
I' ive the better line and a fast back- 
Beld, while Grayson will without doubt 
-ure up to tbe standard of play 
Mm rh a has given Tufts this year. 
IB fact Macchia seems to be the inain- 
of the Tufts taam. If Ith tbe •*- 
"ii of one safety he has seat e d all 
lieir points this season. 
M. A. C. won ber first four games by 
M of over twenty, to one touch- 
down. New Hampshire and Springfield 
sated the Maroon and White be- 
[ Continued on page 6J 



Gives Interesting Talk on "The Man 
Who Arrives". 

Mr. Frank K.Speare, President of the 
Noriheaslern College, "I Boston, nave 
a very inslruciive talk on " The One 
Who \rrives," at asseml.ly last Wed- 
nesday. His position adonis him an 
opportunity to si inly young men and 
their problems, and he told some ol I he 

tklagi which he thinks essential for 
their saeceea, 

A (.neat army of men li;iv<- an oppoi ■ 
(unity for bigber education, (inly one 
man la every hundred is I college 

graduate, and only tea <>i every Imn- 

,1ml have even gOB* to I high school, 
which means that Ibe majority of « it i - 
MM of the Hatted Stales h;i\r lecei veil 

a grammai srhool education. Statistics 
show that B0%o1 all tbe bigber positloaa 

in life are hei.i b) 1 his ix of college 

men. 

Who is the man that will arrive and 
be successful'.' Me is a good animal, 
'['he modem business man cailies live 
to ten times the load his father did. 
therefore, be must be a belter man 
physically t<> win out in the race of life. 
He has an education. The vocaiional 

tcbool ii beet for ibe stndenl m h<- Ii 

latMfbt locoiiccnirateon aceriain tbleg. 
When a man noes oiil to sell his Mr- 

vices 10 the wo. l.l. it asks. "What can 

you do?" and •Mow well can JOB do 
It?" In other worde, a College degree 

DOtblBg unless Ihe push Ii be- 
ocial success. The 



STATISTICS OF THE 

1920 AGGIE ELEVEN 



Brief Sketches of the Gridiron Wear- 
ers of the Maroon and White. 
The following brill sketches and 

statistics oi the members of ibis year's 
Iggle eleven are of interest as uiviny 
tbe personnel of tbe team and showing 
how Coach Gore's warriors shape up 

Ibis season in gridiron expel ieiice anil 
ability. 

Toole. Harold W. '21. captain and 

quarterback, weighs 186. Be prepared 
for college at Hudson Hlgb, where b< 

played fallback. Me captained and 

played fullback on Ibe 1919 freshman 

eleven. Ihe best yearling team I'v.'i 
turned mil here. Lasl year be won Iris 
M at fullback, playing all ol every 

game. Miiiied io quarter t bis season, 

he has been playing a line game, II* 

I "lillllll^ll on l«k" 



Capt. Poole's Kleven Fights (lamely 
Against Far Heavier Team. 

I'oi ibe Ural tiine in li\e Vi ai- iggle 

weni down i o defeat before bprlngfield, 
saiunlav; t'lmeb Harry's mea playing 
Due football snd winning 89-7. Tbe 

inial runup ol ibe Ked and While was 

tbe largeel 1 hat a Hprlngftald team has 
runup i 1 1 1 \ years sgainal ber obi 

1 i v :i Is. M \ 1 . has no cause In leel 
ashameil nt Ihe score, for Ibe Malooli 

and While wsrriors fougbl la tbe last 
diich agalnal a team superior in experi- 
ence and far superior in weight. The 

story oi ibe game is one of ■ llgbt. 
good defence agalnal a bcavy, powerfal 

and veisalile ollcnse. and Ibe latter 
won. 

TboUgb il was Springfield's day and 

ibelrgame after tbe lirsi qoarter aggie 

supporters lollliil Ml ll< ll Io eill bllse o\el 
ill the play Ol llieil eleven, and ihe M. 
\ I i-.ii. let's. HlMI si rmi" Ii:iiiV"'I soliillv 
in Ihe slanils slong Ihe east side of the 
field, kept up a peppy line of cheeis 
and chatter until ihe Baal whistle. 
The way the llgbl bill "auie Maiooit 



RED CROSS DRIVE 

IS ON AT M. A. 



c: 



mean 

bind it. ll*' '* :t 

principle of actios 

Mits iiself strongly, 
■verybody is grouchy 

ous. everyone likes him. I"' T"' 1 "' 



and reaction as- 
If he is groacby, 
If be is coarte 



[Contfnued oc page 4] 



To End Wednesday Nov' 17. 

The A ninial Led (loss Drive is in lull 
swiii" at M. A. C. Kvery si iidenl now 

has tbe opportunity Io sobaeribe for 
membership. Tbe fees are as follows: 

Annual >l . coni r ibnioiy $S V aoatalnlng 
|10, life 980, and patron |MX). Those 
Wishing to Join will find someone at the 

V. m.< . A office in N'oii h College to 

help them lill out t he blanks. 

B. L. Morgan who spoke at assembly 

Oct. 21. assisled the Senate in oryani/.- 
iny tbe drive. Tbe Senate appointed 
K. L. Moody '22 io take full charge. 
Under him tbere is a man from each 
[Continued on page s 1 




I \ II II MCOl.ll W. 1'omi.k '21 

Wlm |iilnlH Ills Asuie SMVSS 08 Huliiril:iy fni 
the last t i mi' 

and While line held at limes anainsl 

the terrific oaslaogbl of Springfield's 

heavy backs, and BOl i iilici|iiei.i ly broke 
IbroOgb to nail Ibe runner for a le 

tbe tackling of tbe team. Col line 1 pan) 

lag, and Last's lo»g galas and open 
held running were indeed teal ores ol 

the game. The Seel aggie left half- 
back played sterling football through- 
out both on the defense and on the 

offense, and tore off several long end 

runs. 

Ihe lirst half, and more particularly 
Continued on p*«e 91 




The Massachusetts Collegia d, Wednesday, November 17, 1920. 



STATISTICS OF TEAM 

[Continued from pagell 



is a good line plunRer, handles the 
team well, and th'iB year has completed 
over 60% of his forward passes and 
kicked 14 consecutive goals from 
touchdowns. 

Cascio, P. J. '21, the diminutive left 
end, weighing 134 pounds, hailB from 
Willimatic, Conn., High, playing there 
two years, lie played interclass foot- 
ball and last season subbed at the wing 
position on the varsity, lauding a regu- 
lar berth this year. He is fast, aggres- 
sive and a hard tackier. 




Donald M. Lkxt '21 

Haturday. at Tufts Oval, will be the last chance 
to see this clever halfback In action, 

Cotton, George A. '22, left tackle, 
weighing lttH pounds, prepped at Wo- 
burn High, playing there two years. A 
back on the U>22 freshman eleven, he 
was shifted last year as a varsity sub, 
to tackle, liis play at tackle this sea- 
son baB been the very best. 

Mohor, Robert D. '23, left guard, ltt5 
pounds. lie prepared for college at 
Newton High, playing football there 
and being chosen as an all iutersihol- 
astic guard in 1918. On last year's 
freshman team he played a great game 
at right tackle. This seasou he was 
shifted to guard and has played with 
the varsity in all of every game, playing 
hard, clean football and stopping all 
comers. 

Macintosh, C. G. '21, center, weighs 
167. This is his second year with the 
varsity, he having won bis M at guard 
and center on the H*l« team. He 
prepped at Peabody High, playing 
there two years, and playing center on 
the 1921 freshman eleven. His work at 
center has been high grade all of his 
two seasons and this year he has been 
frequently mentioned as all New Eng- 
land material. 

LaTour, Oliver P. '23. right guard 
the heaviest man in the line, weighing 
174. He played football for three years 
at Worcester North High, playing cen- 
ter and fullback. He alternated be- 
tween fullback and tackle on the 1923 
yearling team. This year he has been 
a regular at right guard, playing a 
great game all through the season. 

King, Starr M. '21, right tackle, lips 
the beam at 173. He graduated from 
Adams High, playing fullback there 
two seasons. He played right tackle 
on the 1920 freshman team, and last 
year was a regular at the same position 
on the varsity. He is a tower of 
strength in the line and a brilliant de- 
fense man. He is rated by Bob Dunbar 
as a possible all New England tackle. 

Grayson, Raymond H. '23, right end, 
weighs 153 pounds, and has been play- 
ing a sweet game with Capt. Poole's 
outfit. Coming to Aggie from Milford 
High with three years' gridiron expe- 
rience, he captained the 1923 freshman 



eleven last season, playing right end. 
He has easily won a regular position 
this year. He is fast down under punts, 
a sure, hard tackier and figures promi- 
nently in offensive play. 

Tarplin, Allan S. '23, right halfback. 
He is only 17 years old, weighs 135, and 
is going like a veteran. He prepared 
for college at Boston Latin. Last season 
he was quarter on the freshman team, 
and has recently broken into varsity 
circles aB a first string back. He is fast 
and picks holes well. 

Lent, Donald M. '21. He plays left 
halfback and weighs 151. Coming to 
M. A. C. from Jdaynard High with no 
football experience, be has proven to 
be excellent varsity timber. He played 
a halfback on the 1920 freBhman team, 
aud last season was a substitute half- 
back on the varsity, winning hiB M. 
ThiB fall he has been a fixture at left 
half. He is a sensational broken Held 
runner and a consistent gainer through 
the line. 

CnllinH, Herbert L. '22, fullback. He 
weighs 161. He has been playiug regu- 
larly on the varsity in this, his tirst sea- 
son of football, and putting up a good 
game. He has developed rapidly as a 
kicker, his punts averaging over 40 
yards in the R. I. game. 

Gray, Irving E. '21, substitute end 
ami back, weighing 164. Gray got his 
tirst football experience under Kid 
QOM'I tutelage on the 1920 freshman 
eleven, where he played a halfback 
position. This is his first season in var- 
sity company. At end in the Spring- 
field gMM he showed up very well. 

Brigham, John D. '21, substitute 
lineman. He weighs 171 and has been 
playing a good game in his chances 
with the first team thus far. He never 
played football in bigh school, but 
makes up for lack of experience in 
aggressiveness and drive. 

Sargent, R. H. '28, substitute back, 
weighs 150. He played football at 
Thornton Academy, Buxton, Me., be- 
fore entering M. A.C. Last seaaon he 
played a tine game at fullback for the 
1923 outfit. He has been playing var- 
sity right half more or less regularly 
this season, and has shown up well as 
an open field runner. 



T^ebest 

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.is the DRESSING! 
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socks, from gloves to hats, from overcoats to underwear. A special suit, 
single or double breasted in a cheerful brown effect, cut form-fitting, at $50 
for young men. Hand tailored— character in every curve. Individuality 
in every line. Overcoats in very snappy models from $40 to $75. 

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144 Main Street, 



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Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Candy Shop 



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Candies and Ice Cream 



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When You Are Down Town 

DROP IN 

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— FOR — 

Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 




COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



"The Home of Sweets 



>* 



Stark M. Kino "21 

Husky veteran lineman, who done Annie tog* 

against Tufts for bis last game. 

Freeman, S. L. 22, 1M rounds in 
weight. Substitute center. He played 
his tirst football with Team C. and the 
Sophomore class team last year, play- 
ing end on the latter. He has devel- 
oped fast this fall and has been used by 
Coach Gore in part of nearly every 

(tame. 
Davenport, Frank C. It, substitute 




YOU'LL smoke a W D C more than an ordinary pipe, 
because it's a sweet, mellow smoke. Follow the old 
pipe connoisseurs and have three, four, or more W D C Pipes 
on your rack. Smoke a cool one every time. Then you'll 
know what a real smoke is. Any good dealer will furnish 
you with several select shapes. 

WM. DEMUTH St CO^NEW YORK 

WORLD'S LARG E ST * M A K E R S^OF ? >INE PIPES 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 17, 1920. 



HAVE YOU A "HANKERIN" 

For some of those Waffles with Maple Syrup? Served 
at the AGGIE INN Thursday and Sunday Nights. 



lineman. Weighs 155 pounds. He 
.uiie from Dorchester Hi^h without 
much gridiron experience and has de- 
veloped into an aggressive lineman, 
playing a great game at right gaavd 
Bgaioat Springtield Saturday. An in- 
land hand has undoubtedly prevented 
his further use so far this season. 

Clark, 0. F. IS, substitute quarter. 
(lark prepped at Amherst High school, 
bat never played football before last 
limon. when he was Team (' Bad Soph- 
omore class eleven quarter. He has 
not had much opportunity as a regular, 
bat he has developed fast and should 
In* heard from next season. 




this, his tirst , season of football. He 
prepared for college at Arlington High, 
hut played no football there. 

(Jould, Robert at, '21, substitute line- 
man, MM) pounds. He came to Aggie 
from Anns Academy, but did not play 
football there. He played interclass 
football his Freshman year, and subbed 
at guard on the Varsity last season. He 
has substituted at guard and tackle 
this season. 

Waite, Hichard ft, Hit pounds, sub- 
stitute lineman. An old Deerlield 
Academy lineman who has played foot- 
ball at M. A. C. for four years, bstag 
used as a substitute this season. 

l..onir vlbert 1). ''21. substitute back, 
weighing 150 pounds. Prepared for 
college it (hicopee High School wln-iv 
he played tackle. He was shifted to 
back by Coach (iore, and has put up a 
good game in this position. 



WEBSTER'S STODIO 

Nash Block 



Fine (iroceries 
Candies and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



SKE OUR LINE OF 

Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hose for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A good 
assortment of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 



SPRINGFIELD GAME 

Continued from pa>;e ' 



C. <;. Mai kintosii "21 

i lever renter, who will conclude two jjreat sea- 
sons on Saturday. 

Marshman, W. F. '23, Substitute back. 

Prepared for college at Springtield 

Inimical High school, but never 

played football before this season. He 

is a regular back on team B and is coin- 

iiiK along nicely. He weighs 14K 

pounds. 
Mansell, Elton J. '21, left end. 

Weighs 14H pounds. He entered Aggie 

in. m Arlington High, playing end 

'here two years. He played end on the 

1919 freshman eleven, and won his M 

hi the varsity last season at the same 

tion. He is unusually fast, and 

liu'ured prominently last season in the 

forward passing game, scoring the first 

lolown against Tufts in this man- 

His defensive work at the winu 

littoa was A-l all the season. A 

broken hand in the first scrimmage of 

ibe year, and later a broken arm, have 

ibined to put him out for the season. 

\«beson, Roger ML '22, left end, 

weighs 148. Prepped at New Bedford 

Ugh, playing end there two years. 

i 'ist year he played end on the Sopho- 

ie eleven. Alternated with Mansell 

»1 left end at the start of the season, he 

v is showing up well until a dislocated 

knee sustained in the Vermont game 

1'iit him out for the remainder of the 

• ison. 

Tumey, Malcolmb K. '23, substitute 

fallback. The heaviest of the back- 

ld material, scaling 168. He is an 

OW Deerlield Academy star, playing 

balfbaea there. He played on his 

r'<>'sbman eleven, and has been used 

frequeatlj at fullback on the Varsity 

season. He is a good punter, and 

sesses a lot of driving power as a line 

plunger. 

McCarthy, J. J. '21, substitute end. 

Iba. He has shown up very well in 



the second quarter, was the disastrous 
one for H. A.C. After a neatly exe- 
cuted forward pass has scored tin- 
touchdown that evened up the score at 
7-7 the M. A. 0. defense was penetrated 
twice during the second period for 
touchdowns; one being the result of a 
k>Og forward and the other coininn 
from Btraight rushes. During the sec 
ond half Coach berry"* team scored but 
once, this during tbe closing minutes of 
the last quarter, the Hed and White 
being aided by a Massacbusetts penalty 
that brought the ball to the Aggie one- 
yard line. 

The game by periods: 
King kicked of 'to Springfield and in 
a few short minutes, aided by a forward 
and several live and ten yard gains, the 
White team scored its fiiht touchdown. 
The goal was kicked. King kicked 
again and inside of five minutes two 
rushes by Lent, several short gains and 
two fine forward passes lied the score 
at seven all. Crayson scored and 1'oole 
kicked the goal. The ball was in 
Springfield's possession the rest of the 
period. 

The second quarter spelled disaster 
for Aggie. Springfield was held for 
downs. Collins punted on the second 
play. Cammack and Watters each 
gained about 20 yards. Six flays 
through the line put Kedshaw over for 
the second .score. The goal was kicked. 
King kicked again. Springtield gained 
but seven yards in three downs, but on 
tbe fourth play Cammack lore off 30 
yards off tackle. (irayson finally 
tackled him. After seven line plays 
bad barely made 15 yards a forward 
pass to Watters scored seven morepoints. 
The third period was scoreless. 
Springfield made very few good gains. 
While Lent, Poole, and Sargent gained 
more than at any other time during the 
game. Lent's run of 35 yards was (he 
most pleasing feature of the game to 
the Aggie supporters. 

Springtield had posession of the ball 
beginning the fourth quarter. They 
pnmbled and King fell on the ball. 
After three unsuccessful attempts to 
gain through the line Poole threw a 
forward which was intercepted and ran 
back 27 yards. For the next few min- 
utes Cammack and Lent ran com pet i- 
( ontlnued on page 5, 



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1HO BROADWAY. NEW YOKK 

CLUH AND OOI..L.KUK 

PINS AND RINUH > 

SOLD, BILTall iHD MONIR M»I)*IJ» 

Suits Pressed, 65c 

on Sanitary Pressing Machine. 

LABR0V1TZ,11 Amity Street 



G. EDWARD FISHER 

THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"'•Reasonable in dollars and sense.'" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mass. 



Deuel's Drug Stobe 



TOIL 



ARTICLES 



Razors and Razor Blades 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 

VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



F*»«e'*» 



SPECIAL 



tore 



$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 

MORANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 
Manufacturers institution Cooking Apparatus 



86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON 



Np 



£&rp*rvter & Morchovis*, 

PRINTERS, 

i, Cook Placa, Auiherst, Maaa 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 17, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 17, 1920. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Student! of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

HOARD OF EDITORS. 



OUTLINE OF M. A. C. 

COACHING SYSTEM 



LAI BUSOS I". Maui in '21. KMitor ln-rhlef 

Kohkht L. JOMBS '21 Manaifinit Killtor 

ASHOCIATK EHITOUH. 
aaOBSI W. Human '21 

Kknnktii A. Bahnakd '22 

SlANI.KV W Itllc.MI.KV '22 
I'M I. I.. ItlllNKI'T '22 

I|.>ii\ki VV. Si-kino "22 

Hi l.l.l Ml f, ,Ia<rmi>n II 

Job a H, Wnmn '2:1 

I,. 15. AkkinoI'-n *SS 



lllJSlNKHH DKI'AltTMKNT. 

hkhi.kkt 1.. asm '21. BMlam ■■■■*■' 

Kvkuk.tt C, 1'kkhion '21 Ad vert Ihiiiu Manager 
CBAULS* A. lii < K '22 Circulation Milliliter 

MYBOS <:• Ml Kit W '22 

Hol.liKN WllllTAKKK '23 

OWBS K H" < • I •*< > » "M 



Subscription 18.00 i»er year. Single 
copies, 10 centH. Make all ordCrs paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager an noon as possible. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accept. M for iimlllnu' Si Sp S C W 
rate of SSStacS provided for In section 1MB, Act 
of October. \V\" :mthori7.e<l AiiKiiat 20. 11*18. 



The next issue of the Collegian will 
appear December 8, 1920. 



On To Tufts. 

s 

The last game 0)1 tlie sea-ton looms up 
ill the neat future as a yame where the 
slate will he eleaneil of the marks 
of the last three games. Twits has al- 
ways been, along wilh Spt i ngliehl, t he 
game of the season, l-asl year t Im- Tufts 
aggregation was defeated on Alumni 
Field for the first time since that tielil 
was made. It was a game well foiighi 
and won. This year the contest takes 
place at Tufts. The Tufts team will he 
.,a_ji,»»i r home grounds. It means i hat 
lk« support o.-the entile student body 
will be needed. Let u "epe:it Ihe Ver- 
mont game at Tofts as a fitting termi- 
nation of t he season ! 



LETS KEEP THE 

OLD BELL SACRED 

An incident due mainly to ignorance 
perhaps of campus traditions on the 
part of the Two-year men occurred 
Friday alter the Two-year team had de- 
feated the Connecticut State College 

seconds. Xo doubt the Two-year men 
appreciated the victory gained by their 
pigskin chasers and this state of exhu- 
berance perhaps stimulated them to 
ring the bell. However, t he Freshmen 
also appreciated the stellar game ex- 
hibited hy their team, but they did not 
give vent to their feelings by ringing 
the bell. Why'.' lteeause they knew 
that the hell is supposed to he iisc.i 
only on an occasion of a great victory by 
the varsity teams. The bell was not 
made to peal out t he st rains of victory 
of half a dozen te;ims which do not rep- 
resent the college as a unit. 

The Freshman varsity does not repre- 
sent the college, neither does the Two- 
year varsity, so let us remember and 
keep the traditions of the old bell 
sailed by tinging it only in event of a 
great victory by the team which is a 
true representative of M. a. c. 

(Signed) 8. w. k. 



'18.— BOW to .Mr. and Mrs. ('. F. 
ChriStUMM. a son. Miles Allan. 



Staff Consiets of Advisory Board 
and Head Coach. 

To the IMS coaching statT belongs 
much of the credit for the snoeaa of the 

M A. C. team this season. Stalling on 
Sept. 10 with a nucleus of li\e letter 
men. they had to build up a learn 
around these veterans. One of theM 
"M" men was injured at Ihe start of 
Ihe season, and forced to leave I lie 
squad, so that only four veterans have 
been on band torn majority af ihe eight 
weeks of practice. This bas meant the 
building of a practically new line, and 
ihe rearrangement of Ihe backlield, a 
sufficient task tor any coaching staff In 
a single season. Though, toil majority 
Of the alumni and m some undergradu- 
ates, it iniiv seem like it season of 

mediocre success, too much cannot be 

said in commemlat ion of the coaches 

when one stops to consider that a ma- 
jority of the material reporting each 

season is without any previous football 
experience, making it necessary for Ihe 

store to build from the ground up. 

Interscholaslic and prep school stars 

hut rarely matriculate al "Old Aggie", 

eligibility rules are still, all of which 
make- the work ot the football person- 
nel of the Physical Education Depart- 
ment more difficult and praise more due 
them, especial!) in a season of lips ami 
downs as I his has been. 

The coaching stall t his season, con- 
sisted of live members: II. If. Gore 'It, 
head coach ; Victor A. Kice, backlield 
coach: M.V. Holmes 10, line coach; F. 

F. Grayson '17, end eaaeh;aad It. F. 

•lakeman '10, coach of the kickers, anil 
Fiesh man coach. Fitch of these hits 
attended to perfecting the work in his 

own department of the game, and all 
bare cooperated in unifying the work 
of the team. 

"Kid" Gore 'IS, head coach and old 
Aggie quartet, has been on hand all 
season with (he old time pep, supervis- 
ing t he coaching of ihe staff, and bar* 

ing charge ol the practice. 

Victor A. Itice. backlield coa.h. is one 
of the new acquisitions to the coaching 
stall this year. lie is | graduate of 
North Carolina State College, being 
varsity quarterback t here, and captain 
of the eleven in li»14. I'tider his cap* 
laincy, North Carolina had one ol their 
best teams, culminating their season 
with a victory over Ihe Army, lie has 
added to the coaching staff a wealth of 
football knowledge and has worked un- 
tiringly for t he success of t 'apt. Poole's 
team, giving careful attention to the 
backlield men. 

H. P, Holmes '20, varsity tackle for 
three years, has handled theeeacbing 

of the line. At t he start of the season, 
he faced the problem of havingonly two 
veteran linemen, center ami right 
tackle, so that he has had to build up 
the left side of the line from new ma- 
terial entirely. Coupled with this is the 
fact that most of the candidates were 
comparatively light. Thai be has been 
successful, is shown ill the defensive 
power apparent in the line. 

F. F. Grayson '17, has coached the 
ends, developing two class A A regulars. 
and a number of speedy subwing men. 

li. F. (Jake) .lakeman '20, has spent 
considerable time with the klchers. 
lie seemes to be developing a coming 
punter in Collins, while several hacks 
on teams 15 and C are coming along 
rapidly under his training. 

This loyal corps of live, have given of 
their best during the pasl season to put 

Aggie football on the map, and though 



•ncounteriiig several difficulties, they 
bare succeeded in whipping together a 
real eleven, which, win or lose, lias 

played bard, clean football, often 

against teams far heavier. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

[Continued from iwtte ll 

money, he will not have it. In fact, 
the business man of to-day must be a 
good mixer, for business is built on 
friendship. He is an economic success. 
Over 86% Of our businessmen fail be- 
cause i hey are not thrifty. The safest 
and surest way of saving is to take out 
a life iusursnee policy at an early age 
along with a few shares in a co-opera- 
tive bank. He is a good citizen. Ordi- 
nal iallv, ihe American must he pushed 
to the polls, while the foreigner rules 
politics. Graft isgie.it in most public 
Offices and elliciency is almost an un- 
heard of thing. Be has a high moral 
sense. Tint lit til ness is a prime requis- 
ite to credit sad credit is the struct ore 

of htisincss. for there is no place for the 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC I'.l.tM 'K, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

— Popular wiih M. A. 0. Men — 

Next Assembly, FRIDAY, Nov. 1 9, at 8 p. m. 

Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 

up some real Bargains in 

HI6H GRADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SALE! 

Also Expert Shoe Repairing' done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on jmir way up town. 




man who fails to keep engagements 
and neglects to pay his bills. Finally, 
he is religious. The main thing that 
stands between us and barbarism is re- 
ligion. The selfish materialistic man 
will not succeed. 



Last Monday evening, Nov. H, an in- 
formal meeting was held by the ex-'lW 
men at Aggie in the Phi Sigma Kappa 
House. Various plans were talked over 
sad discussed. About 15 were present. 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men tauutit to lead bf Quickest methods. 

InquMmm ot Mill* Studio, 

P.O. lluildlitK. Phone 46«-K 



The Margin of Safety 

The need of a "margin of safety" is 
not eoaflned to the building of bridges 
or sky scrapers. 

Milk and milk products need the 
"safety margin" which efficient anil 
dependable cleanliness provides. 

The growing use by the dairy indiis 
try of 



is contributing very largely to the pro 
tection of the dairy and creamery from 
the preventable losses which result from 
unsanitary condition in manufacturing 
processes. 

Then, too, they say that this cleaner 
supplies this adequate protection very 
economically. 

Indian in circle 

Order from your supply 
house. 

. It cleans clean. 

in every pkg 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




Nothing to be afraid of. 
If anything goes wrong — 
money back. 

That's the guarantee that goes 
with everything we sell — cloth- 
ing, furnishings, hats and shoes. 

Rogrrs Pkkt Company 




Broadway 

at Kith Si. 

Broadway 
at Warren 



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al 34th St. 

Fifth Ave. 
at 41st St. 



01 LAVAL 

Cream 

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The best of all 
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Save $15 to $20 
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50,000 BRANCHES AND LOCAL 
AGENCIES THE WORLD OVER 




"WINTER COMBS TO RULE THE VARIED YEAR** 

Wheezy ! Sneezy ! Freezy ! Slippy ! Drippy ! Nippy ! 

'f^ BPT it till <iii«l wear a WALSH sli<>cp-l inrd coat, a creation to li«» 

">• «lini>lir«l and 1 I meil with. Let Comfort Im* your first thought, 

second nature and sixth sense. 

More than a Toggery — 

A College Institution. 





THE M. A. C. 1920 COACHING STAFF 

From let t to right : K. E. < iraj son, eoacb oi t be ends; It. 1'. Holmes, line eoaeb ; II . M . < lore, bead coacb ; ll. F. .lake 

man, coach oi the kickers: \ . A. Rice, backlield eoacb. 



SPRINGFIELD GAME 

I niii iii iL.-il from pSM :i. 

lion to sec who eotibl uain the most. 
ground. Finally Springfield %jot the 
ball on our 40-yard line and went down 
the held for their final score. The 
gsflte ended soon after with the boots 
»-7. 

The lineup: 

vi. v. c. BPKJstoriBI.il 

Grcysoa, re le. L. Waiters, Drew 

King, rt It, Adams 

Brigbsm, Davenport, Gould, v\> 

ly. < owell 
Mackintosh, Freeman, c 

c, Bedell, GCBBBM 

Mohor, Ig rg, Daaney, Ifaoomber 

t'otton, It It. Mootiev 

I SSCio, <iray, le re. I'. Wallers. Miller 
Poole, <|b oh, Gcddard 

Lent, lhb Ihb, Kedshaw. Ward 

Sargent, Tarpliii, rhb 

rhh, Catiunaek . BebactCf 

rhb, A vil, Hodges 

Collins, fb to, ( iveletto. n'Donnell 

ronobdowns — Catnmaek, Kedshaw. 
Walters, Goddard and Gray son. Goals 
from touchdowns— Can mack 8, < 'ivel- 
etto and Poole. Referee— Carpenter ot 
Harvard. Umpire —Dorm sa of Colum- 
bia, Head lineman — I .ark in of Hoi) 
'loss. Time — 15 minute periods, 



SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

Six co-eds staged another peppy stunt 
Saturday when they walked to Spring- 
held. 

Too much cannot be said of the 
raved playing of Lent. The fleet Aggie 

lialfback was here, there, and every- 
where. In fact, Springfield completely 
it track of him at times. Bisdefen- 
work was only a shade behind his 
irkable offensive play, and his long 
- were one of the features of the 

>■• He may be small — but oh my! 

Sunday Union very generously 

1 I us credit for having three football 

•is on our eleven. We didn't see 

"I the maroon jerseyecl players, 

•i regular ot sub. who wasn't play* 

he gams of his life, and moreover. 
1 playing was often times a< good as 
bpringneld Hashed. 



Collins' punts were all Iohl', straight 

down-i he-lield spirals that carried blgh 
and far. They averaged fori v yards. 
His panting speaks well for "Jakes'*" 
coaching, and In snotbei year b'e should 
rank well up with the best Intercolle- 
giate hooters, 

Cammsck and Clvilelto did the most 
brilliant work lot Springfield; the for- 
mer with his wide end runs, and Ihe 
lalterwilh his 1 1 SO plunging. In fact, 
Ihe Western licscrve star was Ihe only 

back who gained consistently through 
tbe Massachusetts line. Camraack oer- 

lainly could tear in a broken Held. 

Between the balres, Springfield stu- 
dents staged a mock-football name, 
wii h 1 he ' farmer's "and "physical direc- 
tors" .is opponents. A pumpkin was 
used lor the ball, and t he st ri BUaagC 
was test and furious until the Aggie 
Cow was shot and slain. A funeral pro- 
cession wast bee formed, end ths corpse 
of the pom bovine, kicking sadly, was 

removed from the liebl on a stretcher. 
Atlei 1 his exhibition, a gTOUp of 

M . A. C. men, clad in physical educa- 
tion regalia, staged an act entitled 

"S. T. S. Travel i 11 ji Circus. " l.cwan- 
dowskl '22. was the strong man, but he 

failed to badge ihe otto pound (feather 

Weight) dumbbell. which a bottle ol 
'hooch'' enabled Ihe "living skeleton," 
Smith fj, to raise with ease. 

Both acts received prolonged sp- 

planse, ami were means of merrily p 
log lbs lime between the halves. 

We hail plenty ot seats reserved for 
us this fall, in marked contrast with 
last year. Perhaps this was because 
the Aggie cheering section was well 
filled at two o'clock. 

On Main Street, alter theyame was 
over, one cute little thing was heard to 
remark . " Aggie most have won j 1 heard 
1 hem cheering down by the Hridgway." 
It is bard for some people in under- 
stand how we can always look at the 

bright side. 

It is well that the spring field liolley- 
men do not have an Aggie parade to 
Contend With every day in the week. 

State Street traflte was well sigh para- 
lysed foi 1 few minutes, .1- lb« conduc- 



tors were busj oliushlngbach and fourth 
adjusting their trolleys. Many of them 
took it good-naturedly, but for those 

Who did not woe be it unto them. 
The Court Square audience knew that 

Annie was then-, and there sirotin Sat- 
urday night. The crowd nave a demon- 

st ration of the king of staging which we 

encourage here, mixed in wilh Si.nie 
good snappy Annie cheers, which 
brought down I he house. 

There was no question about Aggie's 
touchdown: it was clear-cut and well- 
earned. Poole, standing well behind 

t he line, shot the ball like a bullet di- 
rect ly into t in arms of Dame Grayaon 

who was running behind the goal line, 
not a man was in his vicinity al the 
time. "Cap." then added one mole in 
his 1<M»% record of goals kicked this 

season, this ranking his fourteenth 
goal. 



The class in sgricultural education f>o 

is making a series of memory tests with 

a view to determining tbe law of eco- 
nomical learning. 

'18.— 8. M Richardson, who is in tbe 

market gardening business at Arling- 
ton, was on Ihe campus lasl week. 



TUFTS VS. M. A. C. SATURDAY 



Aggie H 

Aggie 21 
Annie 21 
Aggie 21 
Annie 
Ann 
Aggie T 

Annie 10") 

Tufts 7 
Tufts «l 
Tufts 7 
Tufts 7 
Tuffs 
Tufts 2 
Tufts 

Tufts 2!) 



C. A. c. 

Bales 

W. P. I. 

I. V. M. 

N. II. Stale 

R. I. Stale 



Springfield 2* 

Opponents b4 

Bowdoin 

West Point 2* 

Norwich 

Dartmouth M 

Vermont 7 

Detroit »(."« 

Boston College '■>! 

Opponents 171 



1"). P. F. Whitnioie was on Ihe 
campus lasl week. lie is larmiug in 
Sunderland. 

S. S. HYDE 

OftlloUlll illltl J *- -v\'«» I *» 1- 

■i PtsSSant Street lie one lliclil 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Falls Qeaiaateesl 

N0VICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neat lv and prompt y done. 

Work called f«>i and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



lei. 9 J 



I i>i iiii'i |j < uluuibta < sfa 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 
WHILE YOl! WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Amherst 



M ass . 




\ 



Furnishings, Shoes 



The Mm— chuaetts Collcgkn, Wednesday, November 17, 1920. 



7 



The MaflMchueertB Collegian, Wedneedty, November 17, 1920. 



TUFTS GAME SATURDAY 

I Continued from page 11 



OMM of their heavier linen; and Rhode 
Island was very fortunate in holding 
the AirKie team to a tie. Tufts ban lost 
all l»ut two Karnes wnile her opponents 
have piled up 171 points. She has de- 
feated Norwich and Bowdoin and lost 
|0 several strong teams including 
West Point and BoBton College. Al- 
thOBgk Dartmouth defeated Tufts only 
14-7, i his is ino ndication that Tufts is a 
stronger team than others that have 
l.layed the (Jreen team for the team 
from Hanover was composed almost en- 
tirely of suits. Tufts only score was a 
long run l>y the fleet footed Macchia. 

Tofts has played a defensive game 
this year. So has Aggie; with a better 
line M. A. <'. should soon lire the Tufts 
defense and open holes for the back- 
field attack. Capt. Keefe at fullback 
iind Martin at halfback are two good 
men for line plunges but it in certain 
they will meet their match when they 
hit the Aggie line. LsOsJa at quarter 

in :i g I general but not as consistent 

a man as Capt. l'oole of the Aggies. 
Poole's {generalship is the games this 
season has been of the best and in the 
Vermont game, especially, was he at 
lushest. Vermont defeated Tufts 7-0 
and Aggie defeated Vermont 21-7. 

Last year Aggie defeated Tufts 14-0. 
Tufts had a team that had beateu 
Detroit 7-H. Now this year Detroit, with 
a stronger team to be sure, defeated 
Tuftstt5-2. Tufts has been outweighed 
by nearly all her opponents. The loss 
of such men as MacMamara, to Detroit 
has weakened the team this year. 
Macchia aud Keefe have been injured 
but will be able to play Saturday. 

The showing of the Aggie team 
against Springfield leaves no doubt in 
the minds of Aggie supporters but 
what Tufts will receive a bad beating. 
The line is going especially well now. 
Grayson and Cascio are playing the 
best games of the careers at ends: and 
with a few drills this week in funda- 
mentals and interference the backfield 
will be at top notch form. 

Coach Gore has a large string of sub- 
slit utes, some 14 of which are going to 
Medford. Lent's remarkable ability to 
run in an open Held, and Collins' punt- 
ing are again factors which will play a 
large part in bringing an Aggie victory. 
Mohor. King, Mackintosh, and Cotton, 
with Lent and Poole, spell DEFEAT 
for Tufts. 



S. A. (Dolly) Dole '16, Btands in Aggie 
football as probably the greatest center 
who ever wore the Maroon and White. 
He played varsity football at M. A. C. 
for three reasons, establishing an envi- 
able reputation as a hard, dean-play- 
ing, clever lineman. From lime to 
time in past seasons he has assisted in 
coaching the centers, lending valuable 
aid to the coaching staff. 

(ieorge \i. (Brad) Palmer 'It), is well 
known to M. A. C. alumni and under- 
graduates as quarter oil the 1»15 eleven 
which held Harvard 0-7, tied Tufts and 
beat Springfield. 'Brad'' was assistant 
varsity coach in 1W16 and again in 1010. 
While in the service he captained the 
Camp Devens service team. As assist- 
ant coach he worked mostly with the 
backs aud kickers, with great success. 
This season hej has assisted the coach- 
ing staff, giving instruction to the 
kickers when be was back on the 
campus for a few days. 

Emory E. (Em) Grayson '17 needs no 
introduction even to the present genera- 
tion of Aggie men. He played end on 
the victorious 1010 eleven asd captained 
the learn in 1910, playing exceptional 
football. Last season and this he has 
served as assistant coach, working with 
the ends. 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 

i 



Rmpmlrlng 

T. MIENTKAS 



Our Bread 
Rolls and 
Pastry 



— THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 



Just fill the gap between 
supper and breakfast. 



Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing | VV. B . DRURY 

II Pleasant SI., Amherst, Mass. 

BECOME A MEMBER OF THE UB6EST LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY IN THE WORLD 

You will insure later-why not now? Inquire about a 20-year Endowment loi 
your age. CHARLES W. CURT1N, I McClellan Street, Amherst. Tel. MJ-R 

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 



ALUMNI FOOTBALL 

COMMITTEE PERSONNEL 



Four Former Aggie Grid Stars Have 
Acted in Advisory Capacity 
This Season. 
An attempt to put Aggie football on 
the same basis, as regards supervision, 
as at the leading American colleges, 
has been the selection of an Alumni 
Advisory Football Committee for the 
1920 season. This committee chosen 
just previous to the beginning of the 
season consists of four members: H. 
W. Brewer 14, S. A. Dole '15, 6. B. Pal- 
mer '10, and K. E. Urayson 17, all of 
whom are former Aggie gridiron stars, 
and thoroughly familiar with M. A C. 
football. A brief sketch will serve to 
indicate the reasons for their selection 
as members of the committee. 

H. W. (Mike) Brewer 14 made the 
varsity football team his Freshman 
year, and played four years at left half 
back. He captained the varsity in 
1914, and during his four years on the 
team played brilliant football. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

W'KONKSIlAY, NoVKMHKH 17. 

4-00 p. m.— Annual Freshman Sopho- 
more Foolball (iame. 

TlllJKBDAV, No\ -KMBKIl IS. 

7-00 v. M.-Band Rehearsal . Social 
Cnion Rooms. 

FUIOAY, NoVKMItKIt 19. 

f-40 a. m.— Chapel. 

MO f. M.—CleeClub Rehearsal, Stock- 
bridge Hall 114, 
Saturday. Novkmhkh 20. 

2-00 p. m.— Varsity football, M. A. C. 
vs. Tufts College at Medford. 

2-30 v. m. — VarsityCrossCountry Meet. 
M. A. C. vs. Springfield Col- 
lege, at Springfield. 
Sunday, Xovkmkkk 21. 

9-10 a. m.— Sunday Chapel. Speaker 
to be announced. 

Monday, Novkmhkh 22. 
7-40 a. m.— Chapel. 

TlIKBDAY, NOVKMHKK 23. 

7-tf> p. m.— Senate Meeting. 

Wkdxksday, Novkmhkk 24. 
12-00 m. -Thanksyivinu receRs be- 
gins. 
Monday, Novkmhkk 29. 
7-40 A. m.— Chapel. 

Tl KSDAY, NnVK.MHK.lt 30. 

7-15 p. m.— Senate Meeting. 
7-30 p. m. — Poultry Club. Stock- 

bridge 312. 

WKDNK8DAY, I)K( KSIllK.lt 1. 

3-00 p. m. — Assembly. Mr. Adams 
Wilkinson, Holyoke, Labor 
Commissioner, American 

Writing Paper Co. 

Tiuhsday, Dkckmhkk 2. 
7-00 p. m. — Band Rehearsal, Social 
Union Rooms. 

Fkiday, Dkckmhkk 3. 
7-40 a. m.— Chapel. 
7-30 p. m.— Glee Club Rehearsal. 
Stockbridge Hall, Room 114. 

Sunday, Dkckmhkk 5. 
9-00 a. m.— Sunday Chapel. Rtv.John 
H. Holmes, The Community 
Church, New York City. 

Monday, Dkcf.mukk tt. 
7-40 A. m.— Chapel. 
8-30 p. m.— Mandolin Club Rehearsal. 
Stockbridge Hall, Room 114. 

l'UKSDAY, DKCKMHKK 7. 

7-15 p. m.— Senate Meeting. 

Wkdnksday, Dkckmhkk H. 
8-10 p. m.— Assembly. President Ken- 
yon L. Butterfleld. 



Sheep Lined Coats from $14.00 up 
Leather Coats from $30.00 to $42.00 

Stylish, well-made, comfortable All Wool 
Overcoats >» a style that you will like. 
Specially priced from $35.00 to $55.00 

Most of these are 

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX MAKE 

You can easily make a few dollars by 
looking these over before you buy. 



P. M. THOMPSON 8b SON 

Clothes for College Hod for over 30 yean 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 

*■«. U. i. MT. 0»». 

Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The (to-Mortimer Company 

BMBJBwM or tmi mMMSM »o«ioulto.»i omcp«ic»l eo«e»«» 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



tt 



'*• 



YOUR SHOPPING EARLY 1 
And easily. Our College Jewelry makes the ideal Christmas present. 
Plan now to give a ring or a pin, and solve several problems at once. 

Undergraduates Ourselves, We Know What Undergraduates Want. 



FRESHMEN HOLD 

DEERFIELD TEAM 0-0 



Keep Heavier Opponents in Check 
Throughout. 

The Freshman team staged somewhat 
<>f a surprise for the strong Deertield 
\cademy eleven in their game on Fri- 
.(.ty. Nov. 12, with a tie score, 0-0. 
' nach Hoyden of Deertield was confident 
<>f giving 1924 a had whipping. His 
it-am is much heavier and hasheen put- 
ting up a good game, having won from 
Holyoke High and .Springiield Central 
llinh by large scores. 

The playing of both teams was hard 
mil fast throughout the game. Tbe 
Deertield lads were held in check, so 
that not once did they gain entrance to 
\ Hide's 20-yard zone. On the other 
hand, 1924 were twice within scoring 
distance, hut owing to fumbles could 
not cross the line. 

Despite their heavy line, Deertield 
Kiuld not seem to penetrate (he Fresh- 
man defence. Myrick and Nelson put 
up a fine exhibition of football at the 
guard positions, in helping bold back 
he Deertield line. Tewbill, 1924 left 
half halfback, was one of (he most cou- 
Mstent ground gainers for his team, 
siaebner at right end broke up several 
ol Deertield's end runs, while Wilbelm 
1 1 renter showed good head work in de- 
ii-rting his opponents' plays. For Deer- 
i. Mackay played a fine game at 
right tackle. 

Salmon, Freshman left tackle, kicked 
off to Deertield, who lost the ball on 
•towns. Then 1924 started off with a 
good gain, but on the next play fura- 
I'led the ball, losing it to Deertield 
sfftio. Butterfleld, Prexy's son, play- 
ing quarterback for Deertield, tore off 
tone long end runs during tbe first 
part of the game, but tbe Prosb put a 
Itop to this before long. 

The lineup: 

ACADKMY, 

le, Snodgrass, Mitchell 
It, Adams 



I i;KKIIMKN. 

• 'hase, le 



Salmon, It 
Myrick, Ig 
Wilhelm, c 
Neltson, rg 
Barker, Noyes, rt 
Maebner, re 
Hilski.qb 



Ig, Howland 
c, Bixler (Capt.) 
rg, Russo 
rt, Mackay 
re, Fetersilge, Kinnear 
qb, Butterfleld 



Tewhtll (Capt.) Ibb Ihb, Robinson 

lint lett, rhb rhb, Wbitcomb, Gunnison 
Williams, fb fb, Switzer 

^ ore— Deertield 0, M. A. C. 0. Ref- 
eree — Kennedy of Amherst. Umpire— 
is of Exeter. Head linesman— 
' hilds. Time— 12 minute periods. 



i lie Garden Supervisors' Association 
ta in Boston next Saturday. Pro- 
r Hart has been invited to speak 
The Future of the Garden Work in 
tke Schools of Massachusetts." Tbe 
ual introduction of garden work in- 
tithe grammar grades has been pro- 
ving for several years past. Pro- 
r Hart is working on plans for or- 
ganizing this type of educaton so that 
it may become an integral or essential 
part of tbe work of the grades, or junior 
*>i«h school. 



TWO YEAR TEAM SLAUGH- 
TERS C. A. C. SECONDS 



'16.— Louis Sclotterbeck was married 
lo Miss Dorothy Tyacke (Simmons Col- 
iege '14) of Brookline, Sept. 4. 



M. A. 0. Team Superior in All De- 
partments. Pickard Stare. 

In their first appearance on Alumni 
Field this season the Aggie Two-year 
Football team tramped roughshod over 
Ihe Connecticut Aggie B—oadl last Fri- 
day afternoon rolling up a total of 53 
points before tbe final whistle blew. 
Tbeirown goal was never in danger. 
The Connecticut eleven wasi-mnpletclv 
outclassed in every department, though 
in fairness to them it may be said that 
they were not at their best, playing so 
soon after a cold ride from Storrs. 

Following tbe kickotT by Connecticut 
the Aggie team started a rush down the 
field which culminated shortly in a 
touchdown by Pickard. The offense of 
"Em" Gayson's charges literally swept 
Connecticut off her feet aud gained 
grown! almost at will.scoring two touch- 
downs in each quarter and only being 
held for downs once in the entire game 
Pickard was tbe particular star for the 
two year men and his numerous long 
runs were tbe feature of the game. He 
was responsible for six of tbe eight 
touchdowns scored by bis team. The 
other two were made, one by Wiggin 
and tbe other by Keating on a forward 
pass from Pickard. 

On the 'defense the* line of the M. 
A. C. team was impenetrable and Con- 
necticut could do little when she ob- 
tained tbe ball. Only three times dur- 
ing tbe game did she make first down 
and one of these was the result of a 
penalty. 

Tbe strong wind not only drove off 
all but the hardiest spectators before 
the end of the first half, but it also 
hindered in kicking off and kicking 
goals. It prevented either team from 
resorting to a punting game. The 
lineup: 

M. A. C. TWO YKAK. «\ 

Gerard, re 



Snelliug, rt 
Merwin, rg 
Raymond, c 
Burnett, lg 
Betlerley, It 
Keating, le 
Pickard, qb 
Richardson, rhb 
Wiggin, lhb 
Steele, fb 



A. 1 . HKCOMDS. 

le, Purple 

It, Good ear I 

Ig, Mills 

c, Beach 

rg, Schlelchert 

rt, Small 

re, Putnam 

qb, Peterson 

lhb, Wooster 

rhb, Morley 

fb, Eddy 



Score— M" A. C. Two Year 53, C. A. C. 
Seconds 0. Touchdowns— Pickard 6, 
Wiggin, Keating. Referee— Holmes. 
Umpire— Lewandowski. Head linesman 
-Ball. 



PLANS FOR TUFTS TRIP 

Up to the present date, no special 
train to TuftB has been arranged for. 
However students can leave M. A. C. on 
tbe B. & M. at 8-05 a. m. and return to 
Amherst at 5-44 i\ m. The game is to 
be called at 2 p. m.,so such connections 
are possible. As usual, cuts used to 
make this trip will not be excused at 
the Dean's office. Some students are 
planning to leave for Boston Friday, 
and spend a little time at their homes. 
Tickets for the game can be purchased 
at Tufts for $1.50, although they were 
sold at the Physical Education office at 
M. A. C. the first of this week for $1.00. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



WRIGLEYS 




THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



Callage Jewelry-Caff Links. Soft Collar Hue. 
DreM Hull Hats. Violin. lUnjo. Mandolin Hti Inge 

Plae Watch Repairing, alto Brakes Lease* 

Replaced Promptly. 

» Mela Street, Amherst. Mass. 



Maita 



Northampton 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 



Where the licet 



PHOTO-PLAY 



Are shown. 

Program changed deity except Menday 

and Tu aider . 

rtttn I'. UKI.MOM. Manager. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., 4, Hamp." 



A $50O Stock of College Banners and Pennants 

TO BE SOLO AT COST 

See me before you buy — Where U buy the paper. 

TASK, 12 North 



AMHERST LAUNDRY 

Has just installed a new machine, the latest "Prosperity Homo in Hotly I'resa" for 
nliirtH. Th in presses the entire front and around the neck at one time. saving 
wear and giving the whirl a uniform smooth finish. 
Citizens of Amherst cordially invited to visit tbe Laundry and see it in operation. 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, llll Northampton, Mass. 



An optical shop which measures up to the 
highest standard of modern service. You 
can rely on our skill and good taate in all 
optical matters. 



Our Art Department ia tilled with pictures 
suitable for the decoration of "frat" houses. 
or for birthday and wedding gifts, erecting 
cards for particular people. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trooser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



\ 



1 — . — — 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 17, 1920. 




Cold weather should not worry you when you glance over 
our line of Overcoats, Sheepskins, Mufflers, etc. 

And speaking of Hats, we are closing out our Dobbs and 
Crofut-Knapp Felts at $6.50-these Hats are $12.00 value. 

You're losing a real opportunity if you're not acquainted here. 



M. A. C. TEAM PLACES 

SEVENTH AT N. E. I. C. C. 



Captain Slate's Harriers Finish 

Further Up Than Was At 

First Thought. 

The cross-country team ili<i not place 
as well in the New England Intcrcollcg- 
lal« Cross Country at Franklin Park as 

was expected, taking seventh plaee 
among tbe twelve tearai represented. 

However, it will be of inierest to those 
wlio read I lit- score in I lie papers to 
learn tliat tlie M. A. C. team actually 

raptured seventh place Instead of the 

eleventh place which was officially al- 
lowed it. Due to the contusion of prc- 

partag to leave tbe grounds, the aggie 

manager accepted the official allotment 
of eleventh position, ami it was not dis- 
covered until the next moraiag that 
MacCrcady's finish had not been noted 

at all in the official 1 1»g. Manager 

(iilbert will enter a protest to the Inter- 
collegiate management. 

The If. A. C. team. Including Capt. 
Slate, Wood worth, MacCready. Kollins, 
West, Even, Irish, Manager Gilbert, and 
coach Dickinson left for Boston 
Friday morslng, walked over the 
Franklin Park course Friday afternoon, 
and ran at LfbtQ Sal urday morning. The 
course covered practically the same 
ground as in previous years. Our team 
got a good start. Kollins leading the 
field of eighty men at the start. The 

paee soon heeams too fast and the 

Aggie men dropped from the lead, 
altboogfa MacCread J was fourth at the 
two mile mark. The Aggie men placed 

as follows: BlatotSBrd; MaeCreadyJMth ; 

Woodworth, :Ust; Kollins, Bfltb; West. 

59tb, making oat actual score, U»7. For 

some reason, the officials failed to count 
in Mart ready at all, Kvers who was 
tlTlh man according to their count being 
sored with the team, making our score 
officially 218. 

MacCready, despite a had foot ran a 
tine race from start to linish. Several sur- 
prises occurred in the running. Loath 
of New Hampshire whom many were 
looking to to win individual honors, 
came in alter three Augie men had fin- 
ished. Captain Mate was beaten i»y two 
Worcester Tech men and two New 
Hampshire men whom he had heaten 
easily in the meels with those two 

eollegee, The insertion of IfacCready's 

name would chance the entile scoring, 
bria gi ng I he order as follows : 
1. M.I.T.. 

Kates, 

Maine, 

Wesley an, 

Williams. 

New Hampshire, 

Massachusetts Aggie, 

Colby, 

Worcester Poly., 

Tufts, 

Vermont, 

Boston College, 



l»v and industrial problems. Mr. Fx-TH.- J. 1 Well is workiiu, forthe 

S.el/le is widelv known for h.sin.iucnce Mossebe.g S.eel Company, A.Hebmo 

am.u.g the working...*., He was him- He W« „ visitor on the campus las. 
lelf 



tdosely associated wilh New York week. 



tenement conditions, where for M years 
he faced the problems confronting the 
city workingman. He was intensely 
interested in the welfare of his associ- 
:l ics and took active part in the conven- 
tions of the American Federation of 
Labor. He organized and eoaducted 

Ihe famous Labor Temple in the most 
eongeetad district of the h.wer eastside 
,,f New York. DttrlOg tbe winter of 
l«.H4K»ir.. when New Yolk was in the 
throes of its most serious unemploy- 
ment problem. Mr. Stel/.le was an ex- 
ecutive on Mayor M.tel.el's committee 
„n unemployment-ami for months he 
spent his nights in breadlines and in 
lodging houses, in labor halls and open 
forums, discussing the labor sit nation 
and potting up constructive plans to 
meet their needs. He has arbitrated 
for live yeais important labor disputes 
in the daily newspaper offices in New 
York and his absolute fairness alwav I 
won both the bosses and the men. Mr. 
Stel/.le has studied the labor .piestion 
in nearly every industrial center in this 
country ami in Kurope, also making 
important surveys of how workingiiiei) 
spend their spare time and of the eco- 
nomic aspects of the liquor problem, 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Clara Kimball Youns ami 
Conway Tearle in The 
Forbidden Woman." Deals 

wilh tbe life ;<n.l love secrets 

,,f a ita/zilnu Partstan <>l*«':» 
■tai at tlieiietuht of bar fame, 
with wealtb, position and tux 

arte* .i» liei |.jii>tliiiitf». 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Matt and Jeff 
Comedy 



Friday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 

Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eve. I Ibuwi 

6-45. 8-30 



RED CROSS DRIVE 

(( ..ntinueil from saga ll 



Newt 

Tosict 

Wm. Farnum in "Meart- 
■trinss." a new rata t"i 

I'uriiiiin ;i musician whose 
whole life Is music, w nan 

ilis.m.l, .niies into his life, lie 

drops tits BMlodi sad be* 

CODMS the man. 
Scenic reel, -.'reel Comedy. 
"llrliiL'iinf C|> father ' 

Habel Normand in"Jinx." 
This ■tory <T a little slavei "I 
a t m* elinu liri us is one of 

the greatest and most ortetnal 
cowadtas svet sereaaed 
"Hidden Danger*" 
Newt Comedy 

Constance Binney in "39 

Eatt," from the itage see- 

MOndaV •?»■« In Which Miss Kinney 

' ' starred for two years on the 

staite 

Hat. at 3 Pathe Newt 

Eva. at 8 ■> reel Chrittie Comedy 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 

night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

i Give at a trial < 

We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



8. 
g. 
4. 

:.. 
«. 
7. 

M. 

10. 
11. 
12. 



.V.I 
M2 
!>7 

iu» 
188 
168 
197 

2(H) 
207 
222 
220 
2.V.I 



CHARLES L. STELZLE TO 

BE HERE DECEMBER 5 



Prominent Labor Reformer 
Speak in Sunday Chapel. 



Will 



At the Sunday Chapel exoreleee, Dee. 
.">. there will be ■ speaker of exceptional 

ability, anil one whom evei yonc should 
make ii a polat to bear, (harles. Stel/.le 
of New York, expert in surveys, public- 



Hass: llasla.n 21, Law '22, Friend '88, 

Barrows '24 and BJtaa 8-year. Ulaa 

lit nee lias charge of the co-eds. 

In the collcgesjhis drive started Nov. 
11, and will end Nov. 17, although >' 
lasts anollier week in tbe country as a 
whole. The New England college* are 

competing to* ihehlghaai pereeotwmas- 

bership. and the winning institution 
will receive a large banner from the 
Bed Cross. 

On Nov. 14, M. A. C. was eleventh 

among theN. k. colleges, with subserip- 

timis coming in at a good rate. The 
drive ends tonight, Nov. 17, at 10 

o'clock, and all subscriptions moat ha 

in at that time. 

The drive is the fourth annual roll 
.all, and its purpose is to gel money R> 
carry on the work for next year, 'the 
bulletin entitled, "bed CroSS Facts fur 
Collage Men." enunierales Ihe activities 
of the organization at present. "Todaj 
the bed Cross is serving 17,000 men and 
officers Of the T. B. army in (.errnany. 
Today there are 20,414 men in the army, 
navy ami public healih hospitals reeeiv- 
|ag bed Cross ministrations. Today 
every man who is blinded ol partially 
blinded in tbe service of thel'.S. is 
able to receive treatment and instriie- 
ttoa at the Ued (loss Institute tor the 

blind at Baltiaaora.' 1 The organisation 

is also lighting foreign plagues, furnish- 
,,m social service for army and navy 
men, aiding stricken communities, com- 
battag avoidable accidents, and keeping 
IB touch with 880,080 families el re- 
turned service men. 

The bed Cross is confident that those 
whom it helped once will not forget it 
„ow, and that others, who are not so 
familiar wilh its useful service, will 
fall in line and subscribe for member- 
ship now. 



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-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place lof 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 





DEC I 1920 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, December 8, 1920. 



No. 8 



FOUR M. A. C. GRID MEN GE0RGE A COTT0N 22 M. A. C. FOURTH IN COL- 
MAKE ALL NEW ENGLAND ELECTED F00TBALL CAPTA,N LEGE RED CROSS DRIVE 



King, Poole, Lent, and Grayson 
Among Union Selections. 



Interesting Talks Add to Football 
Banquet. 



In the Springfield Uniona reeen) 
selection <>t ■ li'st, le e oad and third All 

New Baglaad eleven were ineluded for last week. 'I'in-sda> 

: in- first tiiiu- la flee aneo— tout —a> theevaolai 

. <>l this season's Maroon and White 
..iillit: King left tackle on the lii>i 
leain. OrayaOD right end and Lent full- 
baek ea the second selection, and Po<>le 
4I1I halt on t he t hird team. 
The Union selections, showing the 
.lass of material anion" which these 

\-iiie gridaten rated aoaltlooa and the 

Cciiitinued on page 3 



The annual football hau«|iict In the 

eoaehee, plajera, and advisors of the 

M. A. ('. sipiad was held in Draper Hall 
ii eight o'clock ii 



MUSICAL CLUBS TO MAKE INI- 
TIAL APPEARANCE DEC. 10 



Lorenzo Fuller, manager of the team, 
acted as toasi master. His ready wit 
and humor made liiin an ideal otlicial 
in this position. Miei I h< I >:i :■• | u t-l . 

which wa- tenred i>> MIm Dletber.Caj '. 
Harold Poole ol Hudson was called OB 
for a talk. He took hut a few mlaatet 
vsiih a digetf <d the past aeaeOB and 
its lessons. 

At the conclusion of Toole's talk, ihe 
ballots for the election of next year'* 
captain were passed out. QeOtgt \sa 
Oottoa of W'ol.urn. left tack!e. w.i- 
elected, ami lespnmled with a -holt 

talk pertaielag to the 1031 aeaaon. 
lley Concert Will Open |>ns Ull , It>l|i| . , ,,„. ,, lllri; ,. m . xl 

Season. gave a few inlere»i ing words mi ihe edu- 

lonal value of football. 



Final Standing Shows Us 60 Per 
Cent Subscribed. 

The Baal result of ihe lied (loss di\c 
for 1081 memlicisliips amour, ilie Sew 

England college! limK \|. A. tin fourth 
place. Allhouuh A«gie climhed from 

eleventh to second plaee,Browi aadWot- 

■ I l'ol.v teidinic Institute look an 
eleventh hour spun and ended in second 

and third placet raepeotlvely. Tbe Red 

(toss Honor Flay lor the men's colleues 
went lo Williams, while Wellcslev and 
Wheatoii of the girls' colleges I ied for 
Brat place, each haviuu HM)'^ ni>Miil»er- 
ship. The New I'.nyland Division 

Manager has r o t e ed his appreciation of 

the evccllenl manlier in which M. A. ('. 

■indents have eoatrtbated lotaa fnad, 

The folluwlag list shows how Ihe New 

England colleges stood when the com- 
petition ended : 

< OlMMJC. I'''i < •• 1 1 1 . 



AGGIE ELEVEN ENDS WITH 
BRILLIANT 21-0 VICTORY 



The Musical Clubs are spcedils 

rounding Into shape loi tbe conceit 

which will take place Fridav. Dec. 10, 
,i the Hadley Town Hall. The clubs 

are of the first qaaltty this year, being 

the best that aVggie has turned out for 
Koms lime. 

The (ilee Club. with Harlan Worihley 

jo ii» coach, has >hown fJOOA impro\e 

! in the past few weeks and is in 

eoneerl shape at Ihe present time. 

However the icmaininu t eln-ai sals will 

of value !■ working up the tine 

loiiits. Howard Ooff, the leader, has 

ted some excellent music which 

Deludes humorous as well as theuioie 

■ eal sonus. 

Tbe Matubdin Club under the gold- 

ol I'rof. Kat/enbach of Amhcrsi 

< ullege is also showing good form in 

spite of numerous difficulties, one ol 

which is the lack of co-operation of the 

■ i. lassinen. Freshmen, who com 
I a large proportion of the Club, will 

be allowed to make the Hadley 

i ip. but will be eligible for the Boetoa 

...ncerts. The popular airs and marches 

beiag played in a very acceptable 

merand by Friday ni^ht should be 

- condition. A dress n 
'sal will be held in Stockbrid-e 
ilall. l'hursilay Bight, at which time 
combined clubs will run through 

sal Ira pcoajraai. 

Maaagat Howard has not been able 

range a complete schedule aa yet, 

besfds the Hadley concert, theic 
bS one at Slowe. Dec. •».» : Copley 

i Hotel, Boetoa, Jan. 1 1 Ghree»> 

. I el.. :; ; and Amherst Town hall. 

16. other eoiicerts will be an- 

Dced later. It is aotieabls that the 

cert dates are gTOapcd more closely 

usual, thereby reniovintj the ditli- 

• > of a long-drawn-out seasOB, and 

iring a successful one of short 

i:ttion. 



[.ewi present w'>'* hie 

usual optoinisti. words to the men. 
His speech on the sue, ess ot the season 

compared with otbet yean contained 

the eternal Ni^ie motto thai the 
bl spiiil ensures success in the long 
run." 

Dr. Leatl fallowed the Dean's talk 

with the Imptaaetoa he had gained b] 

the season's show in;.'. Facb Senior mi 
the team was called on for a 'ewjnin- 
Btea talk. The eveiiinu oloaad with ihe 

kiagtag ot ibeeoHageaoaa;. Bvarj man 

was present, including Ihe following 
Seniors who will not be back i 
yeai : Harold I'oole, Donald l.enl, Flton 
Mansell. Petci ( as.'io. ( harles Mackin- 
losh. stair Kiim, Irvinu (.ra>. Justin 
M.t an by, Albert fjOBg, Uoberl (ioiild, 
Richard Watte, and John lirieham. 

Oeorata Vsa Cotton ti ot ffobaie , 
gradiiated from VFobora Bigfa School in 

1918, and entered M. A. C. tbe followlag 

fall. He played consistent ball as full- 
back on the Freshman team in 1!»1*. 
ami the next year made a substitute 

berth on the varsity. His opportunity 
to make fpoA came til and he 

certainly t"'>k advanta-e ot Ihe chain c 
With KlBg, he helped make a pair 
of the strongest tackles Aggie has 
had. His playinn is always consistent. 
and with his experience, he should 
make an Weal leader for the next tall. 

Beside bis foot ball work, Cotton has 

stnis.' for two seal's" n the (.lee Club, 
has held several class ollices. and Wl 
member of tbe six-iuan rope pull lie 
beloBga to the Sigma Pbl Bseiloa fra- 
ternity. 



Williams 


H« 


Brown Uatveralty, 


m 


Worcester I'olv Last., 


70 


t , 




Boetoa 1 niv . (Hus. Adas.), 


I] 


1 ).it t tnoiil h. 


t* 


Boetoa Ualv. (Col. Lib. a ns). 


40 


Noiw lefa Uoivereltt , 


4(1 


Mass. Inst. Teehnolog] . 


M 


Boetoa, 




llllls. 


2\l 


V II. State. 


1H 


Univ. of Vermont . 


u 


i; I. Stab . 


1L' 


Clark, 


r> 


The class standing at Ag«i 


e is as 


follows : 




Poor \ sal Mint. 


Per Cent. 


Juniors, 


7.1. r, 


Freshmen. 


(5H.lt 


Seni 


11 | 


Sophouioi es, 


11 J 


IWo \c:o fHndeem. 


I'd 1 rut 


Senic 




Freshiuen, 


71.7 
T5J 


I'llil Colllse. 


Voc. Poultry, 


814 


Unclassified, 


H4.4 


\ verage tor M. A c. 


iltl.tl 



FOOTBALL "M" AWARDS 



20 Varsity Football 
Coveted 



Bfen To Receive 
'M." 



II,,. |920 football seism was a suc- 

,.,.ss. Kveryoae wbe sag tbe 'cam play, 

who saw the Spirit Ihe men showed will 

bat Uaptala Poole's eleven tinish- 



agrea 

ed a very saUafactorj season when tbay | ajopaosaufa 

Continued on paga 8 



Uoadaj Moraiag in ebapel, Daaa 
Lewie, a- Presldeat of the Athletk 
Board, annoaaeed tbe aamaa af twwatj 

men who will recefva the varsity foot- 
ball sweaters. These men are ; |,,.ieu/o 

Fuller, maaager; Baajald Poole, captain ; 
Qeorge Cotton '88, eaptala elect; Bten 

Mansell, .lusliu McCarthy, I'etel QaeU jlU . 
[rviBgGray, Starr Kinn, Charles Mac- 
kintosh, Donald l.eni. Robert OowM, 

Albert Loag, Biehard Waile, Frank 
Davenport, all Seniors: Herbert Col- 
lins and Stanley Freeman, Juniors; 
It .ben Mohor, Oliver Latour, Bayasoad 
Orayaon and W e b m e a d Sargeant, 



Captain PtMile's Team, I iu'luinn All 

the Way, Downs Old Rivals 

at Medfnrd. 

For I he second lime inasiuanv seas 

ons the Hassacbusetts Agglea aehleved 

one of the goals Oi lion season by de 

feat log Tufts at lledford en tfov. iitt. 

Tbe 1980 team went last year's eleven 
one better, and scored I hree I o lie In low its 

lo ihe two regiatered againal the BtV>wn 

ami llltie last fall, makinn the score 

•2i-(t. Coach Parke's protegeee, after a 

season of reverses, came down to the 

Haaaaehosetta game determined to, ami 

cmilidciit ol, liol.liim the speedy Annie 

offence in obech and winning by a small 

BMUrgla, the Ay^ie fiu ht inu spiiil. 

stimulated by tbetavaiaa af tbe week 

before at Spllllulield, Was llol to be 
downed, and was an impotlani factor in 
carrying the Al'uo-s through to a clean 
awl win Tulis" best men. saved from 

ihe Boetoa College and Detroit gaaaee, 

plus their best team pla.v ol the season. 

counted lot mile agaiast itaa Maroon 

and Whit, onslaught. 

The uaine hsell was an exhibition ol 
good football by both learns, and a 

eloeer battle tbaa the scon- indicates, 
with Massachusetts leading by a af agrls 
louebdown until the latter part of th( 

fourth period, when the* added two 

more in rapid succession. Aggtc BW 

Ibwadgi ovei bei rtvala in all depart 

meiils ot Ihe name. will, a noticeable 
su|.erioiii\ in ability to run the ends, 
forward pass, and kick, ami it was 

these three taaton that oootrtbttted 

most to the viriory. Fml runs pave.' 
Ihe way for the first touchdown, a wide 
skirling of one ol I he wings scored the 
ol her, and I he third came on a forward 
pass. Collins' kicking, gaining ground 
consistently, kepi M. A. ( . in a threat 
cuing position for most of the game. 

The play in detail : 

First Quarter. 

Killam ran King's kiekoff back lo 
Tuf ta' faVyard line where the ball was 
put in play. Holding, on the titst play, 
cost the ISrowu and 111 ik- team 1.') yards., 
an attempted end run lost three more, 
and they were forced lo kick. Aggie 
followed suit almost immediately, and 
an exchange of punts took up the first 
part of the period. Following a 10-yard 
run of Lindell's punt, by Sargent, Ihe 
Aggie baekfteld, starting on their Hft 
\ aid line, launched a dn ve that carried 
the pi-skin over lulls goal line in nine 
plays tor the BlBf seota A 15-yar.l 
penalty on the liist play set ns back to 
I be 20-vaid line. Then Sargent skirled 
Macchia's end to a < leal Held, racing fgj 
yards before be was brought down b) 

Haeeblaoa Tufts' flb-yard line, a fei 

ward pass went incomplete Lent slid 
off right tackle for eight yards, and 
Sargent, through left tackle, made it 
first down. Lent reeled oft Yl yards 



\ 



> 

n 

•r 

^* • 
w 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 8 t 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December *, 1920. 



arouiul right end, making first down 
again, thin time with only six yards to 
the Koal line. Saruent got a yard 
througfa left tackle. Lent added four 
more around rigbt end, and "Cap" 
■muhed through center for a touch- 
down. Be k'.U.'l ihe goal. Score— 
M. A. 0.7, Tufis 0, An exchange of 
kicks ended the period, with Tufts in 
possession of the hall at the close, on 
their 22-yard line. 

Second Quarter. 
.Starting the second period Tufts 
pushed the hall to their 35-yard line, 
where Lindell fumbled and King re- 
covered for Aggie. The Tufts line held. 
Neither team seemed able to penetrate 
the other's line at this junction of th'e 
game, and the quarter settled down into 
a punting duel. Collins' hoots, giving 
Aggie the advantage, had forced the 
Hedfofd !•«■ to accept the offensive at 
their own 15-yard line as the period 
ended. 

Third Quarter. 
1'unlH were exchanged, starting the 
second half. At the middle of the 
period tho Aggie eleven started a drive 
thai netted 44-yard* before a penalty on 
their third down forced Collins to punt. 
M. A. C. had come into possession of the 
hall on their :$<>-vard line. Sargent went 
around left end for live yards. Collins 
picked up four more through right 
guard. Lent added two more through 
right guard and then Poole was held 
for no gain. On tho next play be 
hanged through left guard and dashed 
to Tufts' 22-vard line, a 112-yard gain. 
Lent skirted right end for six yards, 
Sargent slid oil tackle for one, and then 
a 15-yard penally on the next play ne- 
cessitated kicking. Caplain Keefe's 
eleven gained hut nine yards in four 
downs, and the Maroon and White took 
the hall. They rushed it to Tufts' 20 
yard line; Lent went through tackle for 
nine yards, and Sargent made first down 
through the same position left. Lent 
was sent around right end for a one-yard 
gain, hut the Tufts line held against 
the plunging halfback on the next play. 
A Tufts live-yard penalty for offside 



season percentage of 1000. Score-M. 
A. C. 21, Tufts 0. Tufts, after making 
a first down, was held, and forced to 
kick. The Aggie backiield pushed the 
ball from their 38-yard line to the Med- 
lield eleven's 28-yard mark, Lent rip- 
ping off 12 yards around right end, and 
Collins plugging left guard for 12. The 
game ended here with Massachusetts 
on the offensive on Tufts' 28-yard line. 
The play of the entire Aggie eleven 
was superb, with Poole showing excel- 
lent judgment at quarter, and Sargent 
and Lent's long gains featuring the of- 
fense. King played his usual stellar 
defensive game at right tackle. Macchia 
excelled for Tufts. 



The summary : 

M. A. <*. 
Mansell, le 
Cascio, le 
McCarty, le 

Marsh man, le 

Cotton, It 
Davenport, It 
Brighatn, It 
Mohor, lg 
VVaite, lg 
Long, lg 

Mackntosh, c 

Latour, rg 
Freeman, rg 

Alger, rg 

King, rt 



TUFTS 

re, Ntlsson 

re, Hurd 

re, Carey 

re, Stephens 

re, Kontoff 

rt, Kiliara 

rt, Cohen 

rt, UiggluB 

rg, Shepherd 

re, Thompson 

rg, Saklad 

rg, Segel 

c. Kusso 

lg, Petrone 

lg, Steward 



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Lent, rhb 
Collins, fb 



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gave M. A. C. first down on Tufts' four 
yard line. Lent banged through right 
tackle fMr a yard and I'oole got a yard 
through center. The quarter ended 
here. 

Fourth Quarter. 

It was fourth down with two yards to 
the T'ul t h goal line as the last period 
opened. The opposing line stopped 
Lent on his piling! I bYoagfa right tackle, 
a bare yard from the coveted mark, and 
Lindell punted. Sargent brought his 
kick back to Tufts' 30-yard line, and 
Aggie pushed at less for a touchdown 
in five plays, as follows: Poole hit 
center for three yards. The Aggie 
quarter "foxed" the Tufts defense, who 
had been covering the ends for forward 
passes, by shooting a pretty forward to 
Lent for a 14-yard gain. Then "Don" 
gained a yard through right guard, 
bringing the ball to Tufts' 10-yard line. 
From here Sargent went around left 
end for a touchdown. I'oole kicked the 
goal. BOOH — M. A. C. 14, Tufts 0. 
Kicks were again exchanged until the 
middle of the period, when Aggie scored 
thd third touchdown by the prettiest 
play ol the game in a piece of aerial 
work that was well nigh perfect. Poole, 
standing just behind Tufts' 40-yard 
line, shot a long forward to (iray, racing 
toward the goal line far down the field, 
lie turned and gathered the ball in 
over his shoulder while evading two 
tacklers and dashed over the goal line 
for the third touchdown. Poole kicked 
the goal, his 18th consecutive for a 



It, Vita 

It, Haworth 

le, Macchia 

le, Morrell 

qb, Jeffrey 

qb, Cain 

rhb, Martin 

rhb, Tirrell 

lhb, Roach 

fb, Lindell 

fb, Keefe 

Score-M. A. C. 21, Tufts 0. Touch- 
downs-Poole, Sargent. Gray. Goals 
from touchdowns -Poole 3. Referee — 
U. A. Swaftield of Brown. Umpire— 
R. F. Guild of Harvard. Lineman- 
Henry Butterfield of New York. Field 
judge— P. R. Carpenter of Harvard. 
Time— 16 min. periods. 



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WHY WE WON 

M. A. C. gained 227 yards by rushing. 
Tufts gained 111 yards by rushing. 

M.A.C. completed 2 forward passes 

for a gain of 54 yards. 
Tufts completed no forward passes. 

M. A. C. made 11 first downs. 
Tufts made 6 first downs. 



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SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

During the entire game M. A. C. did 
not take time out once. This speaks 
for itself concerning the condition of 

the men. 

From a local sporting page "If the in- 
dividual football records of eastern col- 
leges included Massachusetts "Aggies" 
then Harold Poole, captain and quar- 
terback at M. A.. C. would rank with 
the first half dozen. Poole scored 66 
points for the A^ggie during the past 
fall, making eight touchdowns and 
booting 17 goals from touchdowns. In 
this department he had a perfect per- 
centage. Poole didn't miss a minute of 
any game, was a fine field general and 
made all the forward passes for his team, 
of which more than 60 per cent, were 

completed." 

How that man Macchia could travel . 
The speedy Tufts right end nipped a 
seemingly sure touchdown on at least 




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! wo different occasions. 

Aggie played a wonderful defensive 
game as shown by the fact that Tufts 
at no time during the entire game had 
possession of the hall wit (tin our 40 
\ard line. 

•Sonny" Mansell, piayiug for the first 
lime since he broke his arm in the 
Bates game, deserves special credit for 
the brand of football he Hashed at his 
old position after a six weeks layoff and 
with m> practice previous to the game. 

The playing of LaToiir and Mohor at 
tb« guard positions was reminiscent 
of the game that thai famous li>16 guard 
combination of Jordan and Dunn used 
to play. And "Habe" got oil a sick-bed 
to gel into togs. 

For individual defense and offense 
play Lent was almost in a class by him- 
■elf, and showed some of the reasons for 
his later All New Kngland status. 

«>neof the most interested spectators 
al I he game was the father of (he late 

Baa" Pond, who sat on the bench all 
aliernoon. 

Mackintosh, King and I'oole certainly 
passed out of intercollegiate football in 
ft bias* of glory. Cotton, at the other 
laekle position wasn't far behind Starr 
In defensive play. 

Col Una Hashed a wicked right toe and 
Rave the ball some long rides. 

That forward pass, both on passing 
and receiving, was timed to perfection. 
'•ray had a faculty of being "Jonny- 
"ii-the-spot" all afternoon, and played a 
cooking good game. 

It Mat tared little to the Aggies 
whether Tufts was playing its strong- 
Mi cotiihinalion, including Macchia. 
kecle, Martin and i.eCain. They were 
"lit to win and they came through with 
a hang, against still opposition. 

To Team and the Seniors of the 
-mad not regulars, Davenport, Hrig- 
liaui, Waite, bong, McCarthy and Could, 
must go a lot of credit for their work 
this season. Some one has said that a 
D is as good as the subs make it, 
and tho these men haven't been in the 
iight they have more than held 
dp their end. 



ALL NEW ENGLAND ELEVENS 

Continued from page 1 



STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

MEETS STIFF OPPOSITION 

M A. ('.sent a team to the International 

k Judging contest held recently at 

tgo, All classes of live stock were 

'litre judged. The Middle West swept 

>hing before them in this contest, 

tod Aggie had to be content with 20th 

H ne among 21 competing teams. Syr- 

e was the only Eastern college 

I >>f M. A. C, and it was only lWh. 
I &Badiea teams participated, and 

II ih. 12th, and 18th in tbe stand- 
Aggie was the most easterly team 

'Land New Mexico the most wesl- 
I he Western teams showed the 
"t iimiinuons work in judging, 

aate unbearable as a result. In 
"f these colleges, almost the 
lirst term is spent in making 

&fl trips, tbe degrees in animal 

■ndry are given. 



Henry B. Pierson has recently 
pointed Forest Entomologist for 
<"e Department of Forestry. He 
' serving as Entomologist for tbe | 
>rd ForeBt School. 



colleges from which the selections were 
made, follows: 

FirBt Team 
Walters le, Springfield 
King It, M. A. C. 
Crisp lg, Dartmouth 
Iterlew o, Wesleyan 
Shun left' rg, lirown 
O'Brlee rt, Boston College 
Williams re, Brown 
Jordan, qb, Dartmouth 
Kitzpatrick lhb, Bostou College 
(iagnon rhb, II. C. 
Shelburnne fb, Dartmouth 
Second Team 

Macchia le, Tufts 
Neidlinger It, Dartmouth 
Cowell lg, Springfield 
Cildeac, U.C. 
Crabam rg, New Hampshire 
Clapp rt, Amherst 
Crayson re, M. A. C. 
Peek qb, Wesleyan 
Bleecker lhb. Trinity 
Armstrong rhb, brown 
Lent fb, M. A. C. 

Third Team 

Comerford le, boston College 
Steele It, Norwich 
Caselg, H. C. 
MeCunly c, Bowdoiu 
Keppler rg. Middlebury 
Walker rt, Norwich 
Codding re, Williams 
/.ink qb, Amherst 
Oden lhb, Brown 
Po.dc rhb, M. A.C. 
Civiletto fb, Springfield 
Commenting further on the choice 
of these mythical all-star outlits tbe 
Union says: Starr King of M. A. C. 
stood out as one of the best tackles in 
the small college lists, lie was easily 
the support of the Aggie's line." King 
was chosen as a member of the firs! 
team with three Dartmouth players, 
two from Brown, two from Boston Col- 
lege ami one representative each from 
Holy Cross, Springfield and Wesleyan. 

The Springfield Itppxhlican, which 
picked King for the same position on 
its all-western New Kngland eleven, 
with Grayson right end, and Poole 
right halfback on tbe second siring 
selection, has this to say concerning 
the work of these tbis season: "A 
•eeoad eleven made up of men nearly 
as good as those picked for the first 
team, and in some cases quite as good, 
might be made up, with Grayson of tbe 
Aggie's end ami Poole of the Aggie's 
halfback, a crack at both running and 
forward passing. 

The announcing of these three selec- 
tions among New Englang colleges ex- 
clusive of Harvard and Yale and All- 
America selections, serve to give Aggie 
football Block a big boost. All season 
long their work has been way above 
tbe average, and their selection does 
not come as a surprise to many. That 
individual M. A. C. players rank with 
the best produced by colleges far be- 
yond our class in size and football facil- 
ities, in a season productive of no mean 
lot of real stars, tbis rating speaks 
volumes for tbe work of tbe Aggie foot- 
ball department, both players and 
coaches, during the successful season 
J just closed. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



■•UlLMlia 1 

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CLUB AND OOLLKdK 
PINS AND KINUN J* 

• OLD. «II. TBH AMD HKONZI MIDAU 



Suits Pressed, 65c 

' on Sanitary Pressing Machine. 

LABR0VITZ, 11 Amity Street 



SKE OUK LINK Of 

Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hose for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A good 
assortment of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 
LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Oeerfielo, Mass 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILETT ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



Ke'» 



SPECIAL 



Slon 



$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.C0 



MOEANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 
Institution Cooking Apparatus 



Manufacturers 
of 



86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON 



No 



C&rpfrvter St Morehouse, 

PRINTER, 

i, Cook Place, Amherst, Mass 



The Ma»u>chi»ett8 Collegian, Wednesday, December 8, t920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 8, 1920. 



THE M\SSACMISETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Student! 0* the Massachusetts A«- 
riciilfnral College. 

BOARD <>K HHTOBB. 



LAItW o«F.M*wi«tt. ■2f?£!J!! 

Bobkbi i. Jobbs ■« HMMtai K.tu.., 

ABSOrlAIK. Kmtoiih. 

<iK>UtUK W. Kl>M U< '•* 

KKNNKIII A. B4BBABB '2V 

Si ssi.KV W. lilt'-: Ml. Y.\ '•■.''-' 
I'AII I. Hi HNKI I tS 

FJOBABI W- MMW "-"-' 

BSUHBU K. JAOBSOS "M 

John M. wiiituku ?B 
i,. it. aaamaToii ■■ 

lillHISKHS ItKI-AKIMINl'. 

■■,, — i.. asm «. — to — » Msb s t 

"I:,,, r.P>-m»1l A,he,«Win, Manager 
ZmAWMJ* k, aCOHW C-|r.M.latlo., iHMM 

MYBOM O. Mi SBAl "-"-' 

II.. i mm Wiiii i SBBS •-':> 

i.« ks B. rwsoB •» 



proper eastosas. 0*a of lueee, «j 

,,,si of adhering lo it"' dignity oi 

BuodHj chapel. There appear to bt 

„ol a few iSBOBg iis. wlm 'I" BOl ><t 

realise the difference between Wednes- 
day assembly Bad Sunday chapel. II 
|, ,,„,,,- natural i bat we welcome our 
issentbly speakers with hearty applause. 
Bat, lo applaud at Sunday ebapalabowt 
exeeediagly bad Judgment aad exceed- 
ingly hail tenia. Wo* »aaj ol us Bud- 
day .impel is our only church. Lei j 
„s conduct our chapel m i icrvlce aad 
not a> ■ public forum. 

DoxAl.ii II Smith. 



Buhfleriptio.i tjB.OQ par year. *"> K le 
copies, 10 cants. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of ebaaffe «>f address, sub- 
scribers Will ptoaae notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Baestsdasssiisai naua ■■lli r ettaa Amherst 

p„.t oinre. A.r..,.i.-i (at swlnea stseeslBl 
rate of postaea provtose foi lBseettoalMB,Ac1 
„f October, mi ■atBorlsad AuauM ao. i»w. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The V. M. C A. OB thiseampus !•. an 

ofgaataatloa wbleta works to compare 
tWeaeereey. The results obtalBad are 

hard lo deflaa la ■ barely malt rial way. 
[| does not seek I lie limelight of puhlc- 
ilv. II ll ■ modest, hardworking gro*] 
Of hum. Who ate a. lively interested in 
gtolag Christian m-iamc til taelf fellow 
men. They bare, and are, accomplish- 
iuo (his in a manner worthy of the 

blgbeet commendation Taeyare dolag 

a worthwhile job in a worthwhile way. 
Vou, as a student, .an glee I hem defi- 
nite aid by aaawerlag Ibeli eppeal eexl 

Wednesday. 



:1-IM) r 
»i-:{(i r 
7 -:;n r 

6-8Q r 

7-iih I' 



7-40 
7-tM) 
H on 



•I-IKI 



7-40 v. 



H l\ M. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wins KSDA1 . DW 8. 

m. Assembly. Prealdeal 

liulieiliel.l. 

\i in. Seerlej . Bowker Audi- 
torium. 
m. Y . M. C. A. Lecture, boom 

114. Btoekbrtdge Hall. 
Tin B§r»A> , 1»k ■ •'• 
M —in. Beerley, Bowkar iudl- 

| Ml ill 111. 

M. Musical Clubs, Press 

Bebearaal. Boom 1 14, Stock* 
bridge Hall. 

|'l:ll>A\ . DW 10. 

, \|.— Chapel. 
H. Mi bice.. social I'nioii. 

M - Musical Clubs Concert, 

lladlcy Town Hall. 
BA.1 i i:i>\^ , 1>i ••' 11 

Meeting ol Truateee aad Prea- 
identsof LaadOrautCollegea. 

m MDA1 ■ I>»•• , ti. 

k: . m. -chapel. Cbarlee Stelale, of 

New York City. 
Mnvuv v. I>k< . It. 
m. Chapel. 
\\ I UNI si> \ \ . I»i ' lb. 

County Agenl Coafereaee. 

Assfiiihly, student debate. 



TOWN HALL 

N () | |. f -Tlie sdvanCSd prices are for 
Thursdays ONLY. The "'her .lass the 
prices are as asaal. __^ ___ 

rtrsl of the w in. s. Hart 

,, . pro. lie tions. wm. >. 

Thursday Hart and Anna NilMoa In 

1 ; "The Toll Gate." A twe-aai 

1... tAIUfkl 

Hat. at 3 

Eve. i.' show* 

6-45. 8-30 

Friday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



tale of an outlaw who fouahi 
on the aqoare. Loaded with 
robbery, iretaway. cbaae and 
battle. New; Topic* 

Matt and Jefl 
Mat. I Tc. t»€ Km. 28c. 33c 

HadKe Kennedy in "The 

Truth," ii Clyde Pltcn'a 

freal stase luccess. Tbe most 
■parkllna domestic comedj <>f 
the season, sad that's ru 
Truth." Scenic reel. 
j,.-. I HacK Sennelt Comedy 

Constance Talmad** sad 

^s-itliriLlV Hilton Sills In "A Virtuous 

SUlUrUdy vamp." from Clyde I'lt.hs 

play, "Tbe Bachelor." Bbe 

Hat. at 3 tiirted with them all from of 

ST— „wiu,«. tirehov to . lii.t an.l one «la> 

Ew.-Jhli..»« ght . went too far. 

6-45,8-30 New* Comedy 

Last - !■ "Midden Dan»er«" 



Eltie Feritueon in "Hi« 

MntldaV House in Order." from the 
muuuay i)|ti) )liy bj S|| A ,,,,„, ,.,. 

nero. Brilliantly acted, hand- 
Hat. at 3 tostely Kowaed and Mated 
Eve. at 8 Review Christie Comedy 



Contemporaries, and The American, 
which is his lamest work, consisting of 

tweat) -eight volumes. 

TH. K. S. Leonard was a visitor here 
last week. 

J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing and Printing 

Hills Studio- Phone 456-R 

The Margin of Safety 

The need ..f a "niacin of safety" Is 

,,,,i lined to the batldlagof bridges 

oi sU> scrapers. 

Milk and milk producis need the 

"aafatj aiarglo" which efxcteBl ami 

depeudable cleanliness provides. 

The growiag use by the dairy indus 



PAPER CITY ENGRAVING CO., Inc. 



I IV of 



Makers of High-grade Cuts for all 
kinds of Publications. 



RADCLIFFE BUILDING 

Phone 700 

Holyoke, Mass. 



H^aMffHL 



C/eaner.<?m/ C/ejnse£ 



is contribulino very largely to il"' P 1 " 
I,-. 1 1011 of the dairy and cicaincrv ffOBi 
I he pievenial.le losses which result from 
uiisanit.uy ...nditioti in nianufaeturinii 

plO.CS.l-. 

Thau, too, they say that this clean, i 

supplies this adequate protecttoa rerj 

economically . 



In.lian in circle 



ALBERT BUSHNELL HART 

TO BE AT M. A. C. DEC. 19 



Freedom and the Razor. 
The question of just how far ■ person 

can enjoy personal freedom and .just 
how far lie can exercise his OWB jttdg- 

lnent comes up occasionally, even here 

in our democratic college, And it is 

always answered in the right way by 

student opinion ami subsequent st udenl 

action. The ever-bright yeariiag always 

liuds h ; s way to I he inui ky depihsorto 
the sawdust arena. There is usually no 
argument la his case. But when one 
iii a more elevated position than a 

Freshman becomes a hit too daring, the 

rjoeetloo appears harder. Yet the 
answer is evident any breaking of 

conventions which will cast a bad re- 
tlcclion on the good reputation of the 

college should not be tolerated by 

1 hose who love the name of \oo.ie. 

The college barber, assisted by a few 

sr..r hers, answered tbe question eOT- 

redly a lew Rights BgO. There is a cer- 
tain religious sect where a lonsorial 
artist is considered an assistatil of ihe 
devil, Noah probably did n<>t own a 

Gillette, either. Buthereal m. a. c. 

oonreation hacks the shaving-stick, and 
the student bod j hacks the convention. 

is. r. .1. 

Communication. 
Being democratic, we men at Aooj,. 

dislike o> follow the hard and fast rules 
of convention. However, there are cer- 
tain customs that we try to adhere to, 
because we all know that they are the 



Noted Author and Historian Ib 
Sunday Chapel Speaker. 

The speaker for Chapel on Sunday. 

December 19, will be Profesaor Albert 

Bushaeil Hart. «<t Harvard I niversiiy . 

Cambridge. 

Professor Han was I... in in < larks- 
ville, Pennsylvania, on July I, l*"<4. In 
ISMti he graduated from Harvard ami 
received his A B. and in 1888 was 
awarded his l'h. l>. fel lh? Cuivei'sity 

of Baden ia Qenaaay. a few years 
later he was giren the degree of Lilt. I>. 
by Tufis, Blchmoad, and by the 1'ni- 

versitv Of t'Ciieva. of Switzerland. In 
18Ko, he returned to his Alma Hater 
an.l was appelated Instruct..! of Ameri- 
can History. In lHt>7, lie was given the 
professorship in History hy the I diver- 
sity, which title lie still retains. In 1H'.>4, 
he was made editor of the ll<irr<i,<l 

Grredaate's Haowrfne, which poslttoa 

be held until 1908. He also has heen 

editor..!' the American HfcdoricelJleefew. 
in 1909 and in ttfj he was President of 

the American Historical Association 
and ol the American Political Science 
AMOCtatioa rcspecl'vely. In 1!UU. was 
Chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the National Municipal League, and 
has also heen a member of the Council 
Of the Massachusetts Historical Society . 
He is a noted author on history, and 

MBOUg the 1 ks he has published 

may be found the followum: War in 
Europe, MHO, Aaaarlea at War. 1M7. 
He is also RdHoi <>f the following: 

Kpoehs of Ainerian History Told by 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 

up some real Bargains le 

HI6H GRADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 

AND CORDO CALVES 

and Othef makes and styles of shoes. 
Vou can't afford to miss this BALE! 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on your way BB town. 




Order from your suppl\ 
house. 

It cleans clean. 



in every vk* 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfts 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




Conn. General 
Life Ins. Co. 

BAHTFOMD, < <>\.\E< ll< I I 

placed over $100,000 INSUR- 
ANCE on M. A. C Students in 
1919-1920. 

OVER THREE-FOURTHS M.A.C 
STAFF 

have insured with this company. 



We believe in keeping straight 
to our course ! 

All wool fabrics ! Fast color 
dves. Highest type of tailoring. 

Dependable clothing. 

The beet of everythiait collese men wear 
Alto Sporting Goods and lufttarfe 

Rogers Pert Company 



You can carry $5000 converti- 
ble Life Insurance for 10 years 
at a quarterly cost of $ll (}() 
\(agt to) 



Full information on plain: 
vonr insurance for the frc^ 
and future gladly furnished- 



Broadway 

at Kith Si. 



Broadway 
at 34th St. 



"Four 

( onvenient 

Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren *» 41st St - 

NKW YORK CITY 



H. £. R0BBINS 
Amherst. Mats. Tel. 442-R 




Creations From Guid Auld Scotland 



CLINCH sheet) wiis pfcorn lo rovtr MM BO fiiu-r m«h»I litis over boon prorimod Mum 
-— s^ flint of the I. undo' the Leo). It is tbe pr e roi f H we aA fliosoil **•] r| H . ndinirii- 
lioo oi tho world. CLANSCOT SCOTTISH PRODUCTIONS omhriM in,v Ciolf 
Iloso, Wiiistoouts. .Iii< ktts. Boll Iloso mifl Knitted Reefers »ro bore for tbooe di«- 

oriiiiiiitifin^ ueiitloiiion who huy tho Host mid skip tho Root. 



BASKETBALL CANDIDATES 

SHOW GOOD E0RM 

Thirty Candidates Answer First Call 
For Practice. 

The lirsl week of baskelhall practise 
has brOUffhl .ml a wealth of good ma- 
terial from Ihe lower classes which 



Coach ,0ore Is fatl putting into shape, teams la the last, ai \\i the teams 

Two teams of Class \ calibre are al the arc: Harvard, Tefta, Middlehury, M. 1. 

head ot the squad now' Tbe five mea I , imberst, Wcsl.van, and St. Lau 

wh.. linally land regular berths ibis reeee rJalvereity, Tbe eumpleted 

year will make a team which will be schedule will he announced in next 

Ihe laslesi ever put BUl al Aggie, week's C.n 11 1.1 vv. 

Haaager Bunker baa nearly completed In former years, kegic baa patent a 

a schedule which Includes wbai will basketball team which baaofteoti ■ 

probably be 1 • ..1 lbs strongest defeated some of the itrongeel leama 




^. 



s_J 



What Is Air? 



BEFORE 1894 every chemist thought he knew what air is. "A 
mechanical mixture of moisture, nitrogen and oxygen, with 
traces of hydrogen and carbon dioxide," he would explain. 
There was so much oxygen and nitrogen in a given sample that he 
unply determined the amount of oxygen present and assumed the 
rest to be nitrogen. 

• 

One great English chemist, Lord Ray high, found that the nitro- 
gen obtained from the air was never so pure as that obtained from 
some compound like ammonia. What was the "impurity"? In 
co-operation with another prominent chemist, Sir William Ramsay, 
it was discovered in an entirely new gas— "argon." Later came the 
discovery of other rare gases in the atmosphere. The air we breathe 
contains about a dozen gases and gaseous compounds. 

This study of the air is an example of research in pure science. 
Rayleigh and Ramsay had no practical end in view— merely the dis- 
covery of new facts. 

A few years ago the Research Laboratories of the General Electric 
Company began to study the destruction of filaments in exhausted 
lamps in order to ascertain how this h ap pened. It was a purely 
•del ndcrtaking. It was found that the filament evaporated 

— boiled away, like so much water. 

Pressure will check boiling or evaporation. If the pressure within 
a boiler ir, very high, it will take more heat than ordinarily to boil the 
water. Would a gas under pressure prevent filaments from boiling 
away? If so, what gas? It must be a gas that will not combine 
chemically with the filament. The filament would burn in oxygen; 
hydrogen would conduct the heat away too rapidly. Nitrogen is a 
useful gas in this case. It does form a few compounds, however. 
Better still is argon. It forms no compounds at all. 

Thus the modern, efficient, gas-filled lamp appeared, and so argon, 
which seemed the most useless gas in the world, found a practical 
application. 

Discover new facts, and their practical application will take care 
of itself. 

And the discovery of new facts is the primary purpose of the 
Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company. 

Sometime. must elapse before the practical application of a 

discovery b< < 1 -parent, as in the case of argon; sometimes a 

practical application follows from the mere answering of a "theoret- 
ical" question, as in the case of a gas-filled lamp. But no substantial 
progress can be made unless research is conducted for the purpose of 
discovering new facts. 



Hi ® ran Electric 

Company 




General Office 



Schenectady, N.Y. 



in ibis Motion. The addition of Hai 

\anl and SI. Lawrence Cniv. lo the 

schedule Is testimony lo the , li.lelice 

1 lie management has in this \.ais learn. 

S. S. HYDE 

OfSffofUBM niul Je\v«>lci< 

I Msasaal Street iiiiione tllulit'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

I'"ulljr UiiRiiiiitii'cl 

NOVICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly end promplj .lone. 
Work called for and delivered, 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



10 Pleasant St. 



lei. 9 J 



I Ol llo-l |] I oliinilil.i I ale 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 
WHILE YOU WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 192-4 



jjjnsjj 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - . . Mans 

Students: Attention! 

FREE! Beautiful Calendar* for 1921 

Especially ordered for Fraternity 

Houses, (all early before 

too late. 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

5 
H 

E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



The Mawachuaette Collegian, Wednesday, December 8, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 8, 1920. 



Of the mmmi out, Captain Carlyle 
(Jowdj, IMS, i« already shosriag U»« 
form t t>:it nun bin bis regular position 
liis tirst (WO years at M. A.O. Hi« plej 

us a hark this J ear should rank bigfa 
amoim eollegiatS players. The other 
ground position is open now, hut is 
sure to he tilled hy a eapahle man. It 
i_ haid to find two hetter men than 
<irays..n and Lent. Both are natural 
athletes and elean, fast plBggen. As 
understudies to these two, (lark and 
Hale are competing lor a regular berth. 

t;. \. Thompson vs is playing "> «•'■"- 

lerOOW, hut as soon as eli«ihility rules 
will permit Marshman to play , t his tall 
nthlete from Springfield will undoubt- 
edly mak.- a line man to fill the position 
vacated when S. V. Smith left college. 
\ number of lirst class men are out 
for the forward positions. A. \Y. Smith 

'fj will probably hold oaepoeltton. His 

uneirint: eye is already aecotintinu tot 
many haskets which will help "AT to 
a I. a unci season in scoring two-pointers. 
His defense work is also of line quality. 
He is all over tbe floor, and also ri»;bt 
,,, ■ hall. LI. Ball '« is also shoot- 
ing well jind proving to all contestants 
I hat his Mat's absence from college 
lias only increased the keenness of his 
eye. Tlllliey , k Illist roll if. Uosel. Mose 
ley, ami Alexander are also men con- 

tnndlag for a forward position. 

The prospects for the season are ex- 
ceptionally bfJfbt, and with no hard 
luck, the linal results should show 

kCfiewell up amoog the Eastern Col- 
leges. 



HILL AND DALE TEAM ROMPS 
TO VICTORY AT SPRINGFIELD 



Capt. 



Slate's Men Land Five Out 
Of First Six Places. 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing Q ur B|- ea d 

Rolls and 



Shorn 

Repairing 



Shorn 
Shin* 



T. MIENTKA'S 



SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM 

INCLUDES NINE EVENTS 



Opens with Mr. Phidelah Rice, Dra- 
matic Reader, Friday Evening. 



Oaeoftbs Heal programs <>t enter- 
tainments ever arranged hy the Social 
Inioii OommHteS will he presented dur 
lag the SOmlng winter months in Slock- 
brldgs Hall. 

There will he a series of al BO enter- 
tainments, beglnnlBI with the one on 
Friday. Dec. 1(1, and coiiclu. liny wit h 
the one l'roin concert the date of which 
will be announced later. On Friday. 
Dec. 10, Phidelah ltice of BoStOfl will 
gtvS his own dramatization of "(ileal 
Expectations," IBS popular novel writ- 
ten hy Charles Dickens, Mr. Hire is 
very well known as an impersonator 

end render of plays, and his "Greet Ex- 
pectations" has been pronounced by 
I.eland Powers as an 'art istic master- 
piece." 

The program for the season is as 

follows: 

Dee. 10, Friday, Phidelah Uice, dra 

math- reader. 
.Ian. M.Saturday, Pill F. Parker, car 
tooiiist. 
11. Saturday, 15. F. Ford, electri- 
cal scientist . 
gob. 4. Friday ,J«din Kendrick Bongs, 
humorist 
1'.*. Saturday. Freshinan Show. 
2d, Saturday, Suwanee Uiver 
Quartet 
Unreh l», Saturday, Hawaiian Quartet. 
•2(1. Sunday, Haven's Wo, 

Sunday, Prom Concert. Albert 
Sands Quintet. 
IB order that members of the stall 
may have an o,. port unity to enjoy these 
entertainments, senson 



The AK«ie Cross-country team walked 
away from the Springfield Harriers over 
the Springfield course Saturday, trim- 
ininiS the previously unbeaten Spring* 
lield runners to the tune of 1!» to M.and 
piecing B men oul of the lirsl 6. 

The Springfield course was a genuine 

cross country, being through the woods 
for practically the entire distance <d 
live miles, I he path BTOSSlBg a good 
sized brook twice, and one piece of 
maish. The Springfield men, who have 
won all Iheir previous meets ngeJBSl 
some of the best teams, were under the 
impression thai the Aggie men were 
the last to finish at the New Euglands, 
and confident of an e*S] victory over 
Iheir own course, allowed the AggtS 
men to lead at the start. Uollins set a 

tremendous pace for the first couple of 

miles, end they discovered their mis- 
take tOO late. Peabody, Sprinulield's 
star who has been their winner previ- 
ously . coine to I he front in I he last two 
miles, but proved unable to sprint as 

fast as Wood wort fa who Bnlsbed lirst In 

•2d minutes and 4 seconds, lowering the 
season's record for that course by It 
seconds. I'eabody took a close second. 
Captain Slate easily grabbed third po- 
sition, closely followed by McCready 
and Uollins. Irish sprinted by Bobbins 
of Springfield In the last ten yards, 
making four red jeiseys to cross the 
line in succession. Springfield then 
captured 7th, 8th, <*tb, 101 fa, and lllh 
pieces. West and F.vers lost themselves 
on the poorly marked course but 
pluckily stuck io the chase, wlaatag 
12th and 14th respectively. 

The linish was at lbs gran d s t and, 

where Au-uie's slashing victory was 
witnessed by the thousands gathered to 
watch the Sprinulield Detroit game. 

The M. A. C. runners had a somewhat 
exciting experience OS lbs way Io 
Springfield, being In the railroad wreck 
which OCCUred near Holyoke. Most of 
the team was in the coach which went 
farthest of the tracks, nadoererelof 
the harriers underwent the serve- 

rack i ni! -experience of assisting dozens 

of frightened Smith tiirls from the 

wreck. The team then walked to Hol- 
yoke and took the special to Sprinu- 
lield. Judging from the race after- 
wards, their nerves were little injured 
The order of linishini: was as follows: 
Woodworth. M. A. C 

Peabody, Bp< 

Mate, M. A. C. 
MacCready, M. A. C. 
Uollins, M. A. C. 
Irish, M A. C. 
Uobbins, Sp. 
.Stevenson, Sp. 

Eilinwood, sp. 

Otter, Sp. 
Stalsy, Sp. 

West, M. A. C. 

Ueid, Sp. 

F.vers, M A. C. 



Pastry 



— TKY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for tirstclass 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

IS Pleasant St.. Amherst, Mass. 



Just fill the gap between 
supper and breakfast. 



W. B. DRURY 



In These Days of High Prices 

Life Insurance is one of those few commodities that has not taken ■ Jntep 
upward in cost. CHARLES W. CURT1N, 2 McClellan St. Tel. $.a * 

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 



CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 

CLOSES GOOD SEASON 



Won Two of Three Dual Meets. 
Credit Due Coach Dickinson. 
With their victory at Springfield, Sat 
tickets »a J l » p unlay, Nov. 20, the Cross country team 



obtained bj them at 

office for H.6Q aaak. 

which will admit all 
immediate fami'v may 
$3.60 each. 



1 he treasurer s 
Family ticketn, 
members of the 
i,e obtained for 



completed a sueeeeetal neason, winning 

two out of three ilual meets, losing the 

third hy only two points, aad wlaatag 

seventh at the New Kngland Intereol- 
legtatee. 



Sheep Lined Coats from $14.00 up 
Leather Coats from $30.00 to $42.00 

Stylish, well-made, comfortable All Wool 
Overcoats IB * style that you will like. 
Specially priced from $35.00 to $55.00 

Most of these are 

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX MAKE 

You can easily make a few dollars by 
looking these over before you buy. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for over 30 years 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 

Will help you secme "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

II you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

SU M.oi»»v or the ««t«tc»p. »Q«lcuiT.j»«t choice co«e.»r 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



Original Christmas Suggestions 

Have you ever thought how excellently a flexible notebook is suited for a 
private cook book? Or a five-pound box of Bittersweets is both reason- 
able and sure to please. And Don't Forget Our COLLEGE JEWELRY 



Training started eaily in October willi 

i small bat promising squad. Goacb 

Dickinson gave Hie nun a good Hi i IV 

daily work-out, specializing oa bill 
work, on Oet. 88, the lnterelaes Meet 

ni' a line on the baal men. The Var- 
sity team, consisting of Mate, Wood- 
worth, efaoCreedy, Uollins, Irish, West, 

and Kvers went to Worcester on the 
.'.nth ami easily defeated \\\ |\ 1.. M-gl, 
M this meet, the men elected Slate as 
their Captala, This team ran in all 
the other ineels; and in fact, the squad 
s/aS now so sadly depleted hy Ineligible 
physical troubles, ;ind lack of com- 
petitors, that there were practically no 
alternates for the varsity. 

Nov. 6, M. A. C. met the V. II. Male 
Harriers on the Aggie course, and in a 
• lose and extremely fast rate lost to N. 
II. 27-^C, due to the superlative work of 
l.eath of \. II., who has been considered 
"in' of the best cross country runners 

in New England, 

Nov. 18, the Aggie runners entered 

■lie New England [nteroolleglates at 

I- ran k 1 i ii Park. No one of the men was 
it his best, and the team took seventh 
• ui of twelve colleges entered; al- 
though, due to an erTOl on the pait of 
the ofletala, we were only credited with 
eleven! h position. 

Oa Nov. 20, our team went to Spring- 
field and ran late previously unbeaten 

Springfield barriers on their own course. 
I he race was a ureal surprise to the 
confident Springfield runners; Aggie 
Hi) lading five men out of the lirsl six, 
and rnaaiag up a score of 1!)-S6. 

i aptain Slate and Woodworth shared 
liar honors for the season, Slate lie- 
the first Aggie man to come across 
in two meets, while Woodworth cap- 
tured the blue ribbon at Sprinulield, 
lowering tbe season's record for that 
counts hy 13 seconds. Uollins and Mac- 
< ready alternated for third and fourth 
honors, while Irish was fifth man for 
'be team in all tbe dual meets. 



The man who buys a 

§f LAVAL 

is taking no chances. 



MOST any kind of cream sepa- 
rator will do fairly good woik 
tbe lirst few months, when it is new. 

Bal if it is a cheaply made or in- 
r ma. -bine, after tbe first few 
months your trouble will begta. 

Why take chances when you come 
lect a machine that may mean 
• in m-h in increasin" the profit trom 
' COWS '.' 

There is one cream separator that 

has been the acknowledged world's 

lard for over 40 years. It's tbe 

ream separator that is used by 

leainerymen almost exclusively. 

■ ' ty farmers tbe country over know 

r He Laval and tta sterling quality . 

perienee has shown them that 

It la Ihm host cream sepa- 
rator thmt money can buy. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



I -W YORK 
BJ Broadway 



CHICAGO 

HE. Mad lion St. 



The team was handicapped through- 
out the season by lack ol 'material but 
owes most of its saeeess to the hard 
work of Coach Dickinson who gars his 

services voluntarily. 



THE Y. M. C. A. BUDGET 

Hy II. M. i,ni i 
It has always been I bs custom of the 
v. M. 0. A. of the College to a>k the 

student body for financial support of 
the Association. Heretofore the Col- 
lege has found the means to empioj I 

General Secretary to keep the organisa- 
tion in running order. This year it BM 

been necessary to do without a General 
Secretary and place the entire responsi- 
bility of administration ol ibis work in 
the hands of the students. In order to 
carry the Association through a success- 
ful season the Cabinet has spent consid- 
erable time ami energy in drawing up a 
budget, which it was though I best to 
brine to the attention of the entire 
student body, before ask inn for a con- 
tribution, so that all might know defin- 
itely where the money is to go. 

The movement of the Association this 
fall has gained steadily in impetus, and 

already several deputation learns have 

been sent from tbe College to nearby 
communities, where entertainments 
have been put on, much to t be enjoy- 
ment of tnose who have but little to 
brighten the daily drudgery of their 
lives. The student body has always 
been very generous in support of its 
lasociatlon, and it is felt that lbs 

response this year shosld be equal to 

that of other years. 

The budget is as follows: 
Trips to Conventions #75. 00 #75 00 

Deputations 86.00 16.00 

(Teams expenses) 
General Expeaees 

Correspondence 5. (to 

Deficit on Handbooks 10.00 

Kinploy meiit bureau It). 00 

Miscellaneous 60. oo 



Social (Flowers, sick, etc.) 

Publicity 
Cards and Envelopes 

( Iranian and Miscel- 
laneous 


25. 00 
18.00 

2."».lMl 


25.00 

40.08 
80,08 

111 oo 


Bible Study (Tsxta) 
Mission Study 

Texts 

Magazines 


20.00 

5.00 
5.00 



State Committee 
Telephone 
boy's Work 
'Transportation 

Equipment 
Entertainment 

Miscellaneous 

I)wi«ht Station 

Speakers 



25.00 96.00 
25. 00 25.00 

90.00 

15.00 

15. 00 

5. (HI 

55.00 

15.(M) 15.00 
50.00 60.00 



*450.0O 



Suggested Additions 
Ef angel Istic Campaign $150. oo 



ALUMNI 

HP. — wilbert Field is in charge of the 
Medford branch of the A m e ri c a s 
Express. 

'19.— Quloeey Bagg aad Balph Suth- 
erland were last heard from in the 
corn fields of Iowa. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Collet* Jewelry (hit Links, s<>rt collar Plus, 

I'ldiSult Sets. Violin. Haiijo. MiJintolin SiinnjH 

Fine Watch Repairing. aUo Broken Leasee 

Keuluceit I'romutly. 

32 Mela Street, Amherst, Mass. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



WRIGLI 

JEt ■ radtase 



Before the War 

pscksss 

During the War 



5 



£s packafts 



NOW! 



/Tbe Flavor Lasts 
[So Does tbe Price! 



PLAZA 

MOfthSMBSM • • Mass. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Itest 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Are hIkihii 

Program chanted daily except Monday 

•ad Tuesday. 

kkkii'k P. UKi.Movi. Naascsr. 




Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hfttnp." 



A $500 Stock of College Banners and Pennants 

TO BE SOLD AT COST 

See me before you buy — Where U buy the paper. 

TASK, 12 North 

AMHERST LAUNDRY 

Haw just installed u new machine, the latest "Ptoaperitj Donosj Body Press" for 

sbirtH. This presses ths satire front and around Ihs nick al one time. Having 

wi ar and gleiag t he shirt a iiniforin kmiooI Ii Intah. 

( 'iti/.t-ns ol A in li«Tst corditilly invited to vinit tin- Laundry and see it in operation. 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IllC. Northampton, Mass. 



An optical shop wblcn measures ui> to ths 
hiifhi-.it standard of modern service, v<m 
ean rstf on our skill and good taste in all 
optical matters. 



Our Art Department l» titled with ptctarai 
suitable for the decoration of "trat" bouses, 
or for btrtbdas aad ireddtns uifts. Qreetlns 
cards for |>artiriilar people. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to sec you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 




The Mas-irhnsetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 8, 1920. 



Cold weather should not worry you when you glance over 
our line of Overcoats, Sheepskins, Mufflers, etc. 

And speaking of Hats, we are closing out our Dobbs and 
Crofut-Knapp Felts at $6.50-these Hats are $12.00 value. 

You're losing a real opportunity if you're not acquainted here. 



FOOTBALL CAPTAIN ELECTED 

Conl buMfl* from p»ge 1 



defeated Tufts 11-0 on Tuffs Oval. Tbfl 

OOlj defeats of tbfl season were suffered 
ill the hands of BpringfleM and \«vv 
Hampshire Stale, and these Raines 
were not won l>y large and decisive 
scores. The Cuivcls'ity of Vermont 
name played at lb* height of Hie sea- 
son was a name that will long no down 
in Annie history as an example of won- 
derful team fight and supporting spirit. 
Vermont papcis were loud in their 
(.raise of the M. A.C maehine-like play 
and the individual play of several line- 
men. It was about this lime thai Bob* 
Dunbar mentioned Kino as an All New 
England laekle. 

Four consecutive wins at the start of 
the season is a record thai any learn 
should he proud of. lively one ol these 
victories was won by a scoie of over 
iwenty points. 

The shewing made in the last two 
games auainsl Sprinylielil and Tults 
w.isol the highest standard. In Spring- 
fiehl. Agglfl showed up very well con- 
sidering the superior WOlghl and ex- 
perience which was lined up against 
her. 

The 1'iitts name w a- an inspiration lo 
the many people who expected to see 
Tufts bold \oo| ( . lo a 7-0 score. Mae- 
ebla was counted on to score one or 
more touchdowns, leu" the defensive 
work of the Aooj,, ends and Lacks kept 
the Tuts secondary defense in check. 
Only those at the name know how very 
mar Annie came to scoring tWO more 
touchdowns. 

The seasons scoies follow 
M. A. C \i# -Connecticut <». 
M. A. C. H- Hales 7. 
M. A. C. Jl Worcester 0. 
M. A. C. II -Vermont I'niversily 7. 
M. A 0. 7 -Uho.le Island State 7 
M. A. C. tl-New lliitupshire Btatfl '.' 
M. A. C. 7-Sprinnlield SB. 
M. A. ('. 21 -Tufts li. 

Totals,— 12o\ Opponents, 04. 
Captain l'oole ranked as one of (he 
lirst half dozen leadinn scorers wilb ttO 
points to his credit, lie has played 
every nunuie of every name during his 
last two years at college. 



lively to I bfl atitomohile, which is not 

complete wiih iis chassis, its engine, Itt 

gearshift, or any one of Itfl parts '•> 

itself, hut raiher is a clever combina- 
tion of all Of th«m. Character is the 
assembly of all the parts. 

lie must he a man of vision. 

Not avis: IT] man, hut one who can 

look clearly and analytically ioto the 
future. 

:5rd. lie musi he a man ol power 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

STIRS UP CUB REPORTERS 

The Col. i. K.«. t \\ compel itioii this fall 
has bronchi out ■ nuinernus assortineul 
of embryonic editors and others. As a 
neucial rule, however, l he "cubs" are 
ahout up to ihe usual standard. The 
c, eds are display inn quilfl ■ hlt ul l )e T> 
and if past records are any indication 
i they will gtVfl I he men quite a contest 
for the positions. The compel Hois w ho 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



„e must he aide lo bring tblugs o J^ dleplayed much flathttet. 

pMO; to do the thinns he purposes to 



Hotel Worthy 



do. 

The speaker spoke of I he need of 

iiinh ideals, lie Mentioned the little 

known fact that there are seven, Of 
possibly eight, Otbei countries which 
surpass us in literacy. We must "grow 
in km.wledne and then no forth to ex- 
press that knowledge >» service" 

man; money 



Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



asm toward Ihe job are about due with 

some work-get going, the CoLueoiaa 

wants workers, not men who consider a ' 
job done when they have handed in 

their names tot ha competition asaaager. — .....__ « 

The following Us. giver a record oi Main and Worthington Streets 

tbe competitors up lo this issue: r.ive u§ • trial. 
MOPIfOMORKS. 



Muscle doesn't make a 

.ioesnt make a man: neither does 

dress, mentality or morality alone 

make a man. It i» ministry, service. 
charily, that makes a man. '•Charily 
should begin at home". says Ihe old 
sdngO, bul "home is a relative word". 
- Dr. Alkins.m. "It I were in Am- 
heisi. I would say my home was on 
Pleasant Si.; '! 1 »•» '» BoetOW, 1 
would say my home was in Amherst : if 

l vara la the Booth, l should eaj my 

home tola Massachusetts: while if I 
were in France, 1 would Raj my home 
was in America." Today we are World 
Citizens, and to the World BOal we nive 
Ml 1 ice. 



Blade, 
Lobrovlt*, 

Irish. 
Hallett, 



< reclits. 

14.7 

11.8 

6.1 

1.1 



we carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



Kin-sii mi \ (Editorial). 



IJIiss. 

Wood, 
White. 

I - . Barteaus, 

li. Slecre. 
J. Ilolteeii, 



(Uualnt 



8.0 
I 1 

in.:. 
:{.-> 
1.6 



G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

catki:in<; H'K 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 



REV. W. A. ATKINSON SPEAKER 
AT SUNDAY CHAPEL, NOV. 21 

4 The 20th 



Takes For Hie Subject, 
Century Man." 

The speaker at Chapel Sunday. Nov. 
21, was (he Kev. William A. Atkinson 
of Amherst. Dr. Atkinson took as his 
subject, "The Twentieth Century Man." 
The twentieth century, said the speak- 
er, is not the greatest because it suc- 
ceeds the nineteenth, history proving 
that PTOgro— does not follow time, but 
rather proceeds in grant cycles. Il is 
because of multitudes of reasons t hat 
this century is the peak of all cen- 
turies. 

What Cod needs and what the world 
needs in this wonderful era is leaders. 
The type of man who can make a leader 
in the twentieth century must be pos- 
BOeeed Of certain unusual character- 
istics. 

He must be a man of character. 
Character may be compared ligura- 



POULTRY AND EGG SHOW 

TO BE HELD ON DEC. 16, 17 

The Fourth Annual Dressed Market 

Poultry and BggBbowwill be held on 

Thursday ami Friday . Dec Hi, and 17, 

... Btockbridgn Hall. Il Isstaged under 
,Hc direction ol the Ponltrj Dopartmonl 

M a < limas to the fat teeing and killing 
work of ihe fall term, and some unusu- 
ally line birds are always to be seen on 
the display tables. 

As last year, the exhibit will be di- 
vided into three main parts. Tbe com- 
petition for prizes in dressed poultry 
will include an entry Coin each student 

taking a marketing course with tbe de- 
partment, and from such commercial 
ponltryman en cafe to enter, it isex-j 

peeled' that several members ol last 
year's classes will make entries. The | 
egg show will have (lasses tor Students, 
commercial poultry men, ami also for 
faculty members, many of whom have 

backyard flock*. The educational ex- 
hibit will include commercial packs 
from the Boston market, charts, ami 
display! of the tools ami equipment 
used tor fattening, and dressing, it is 

hoped that the show will be again 

lodged by Mr. Boomer of F. N. Boomer 

& Co.. Boston, WbO gave such satisfac- 
tion last year. 

Thursday evening will be devoted lo 
an Interesting program which includes 
demonstrations id different processes in 
preparing poultry for the market, and a 

student's Dry Picking Content. 

Friday afternoon all college exhibits 
will bo auctioned to the public, giving 

a line chance to net fancy birds mt 
Christmas. 

\ feature of the show will be a miess- 
log contest, similar to the one which 
aroused so much interest last year, 
when all visitors WON given an oppor- 
tunity to sitiess how many kernels ol 
corn a pair of capons would eat during 
the show. The winner was jjiven a 
choice pair of roasters. 



VI I i: VI I. KM TIES EVERY NIGHT 

(let the Habit 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

Tkt Leadi ng Taitor "ml 

Gent*' Furnish hi;!* 
— Full Dress Suits to Rent — 

Clothes s| gad and pressed by 

Hoffman Mmchlnm 

(iur Work fa Oeejramlerd. 

(..me and open an account with me. 
Phono 302 -W 

11 Amity si., Amherrt, Mam, 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUtlS AND CARPETS 

- K. U. MAKSI1 KSTATK- 

High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



-AT — 



Economy Prices 
M. 



The Shoeman. 



Main St. 



Amherst 



**l 



?» 



BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Wattles Our Specialty 

And other gees' things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STE3BINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 41.VW '» lla.lley. MaM 



KINGSLEY'S HENRY ADAMS & CO. 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, • Mass - 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



—The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place : ' 
the real home cooking and 
college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, December 15, 1920. 



No. 9 



FINALS SCHEDULE IS 
ANNOUNCED BY REGISTRAR 

Exams to Begin Monday, Dec. 20, 
Ending Thursday at 5 P. M. 

MONDAY. D1C. 20 
7-50 to W0 A. M. 

Klori.ulture M, V. B. C 
I'omology 50, F. 11. F 
Poaolofj 75, W. H. li 
Kntomology 7«, K. B. K 
\lgel»ra 1. MaclimtT, ('. II. li 

Moult-, M. B, U 

(lark, C. B. A 

< liemistry 25, ('. I.. I 

s,,ii Fertility s-l, F. L. M, 12, 102 

< .(Mi. Hon. S-25. S-27. F. II. 1) 

10-00 A. M. to 12-00 M. 
\11i1nal II nsli. 75, 102 
Dairy 77, F. L M 
IN.ullry 77, tit 
Floriculture 50, F. II. <' 
7af, tianl.50. F. H. D 
l.oiany 78, C. B. B 
1 hfinistry 51, ('. I.. V 
KogltsaOO, F. II. II 
llur Jourir'iwni 50, 110 
Zoology 25. III. la lv 15. I) 

II. lb C. 11. A 
i'omology s-i. French, F. II. ¥ 

Gould, K. li. K 
Drain, W. II. li 

1-(M) to 3-00 P. m. 

Rnr. Joiirnalisin 68, 110 
/.oology QS, K. li. K 

Tactics 50, V. L. li 

loipsiry 50, F. II. II 
lu-slmian Fn-ncli. Maikimmif, F. II. 
Patterson, 111 

Parker, m. li. B 

I itsliinaii Barman, Ashley, F. II. f 
Julian, C. I- V 
Peedlag ami Banag. s 25 

red. lid. l, II, 12 

III, IV, F. I.. 

Animal Diseases S-27, V. L. li 
3-10 to 5-10 i\ m. 

Microbiology H2, M 

M ciohiology 88, M 
Uni. 80c, 50, E. li. K 
Tactics 25, H, U> C. B. A 

III, la K. li. D 

H, Bard. B-8B, S-27. F. H. F 

I'niltry S-25, 12 

TIKSDAY, DKC. 21 

7-50 to 9-50 A. m. 

-ics 25, C. II. A 
I'tiry 8-8, F. L, M 
Bar. Kim. s-2, VII. VIII, IX. 12 

X. XI. XII, 102 

10-00 \. M. lo 12-00 M. 

Dalrj 50. F. L. M 

Poultry 50. 113 
I; ii. Bog. 75. 114 
landscape 75, W. II. A 
' liemistry 80, C. L. V 
Mathematics 80, M. Ii. Ii 
Mathematics 70, M. li. I) 
Veterinary 51, V. L. B 
igrie. Kcon. 77, C. U. B 

CoBtiaaad om pip • 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

FOR SEASON ANNOUNCED 



Excellent List of Games Secured by 
Manager Bunker. 



.Ian. 



CHARLES L. STELZLE GIVES 

IMPRESSIVE ADDRESS 



M. A. C. SEVEN PROM- 



ISES TO BE FAST TEAM 



Feb. 



I) 



S< I1KIM I.I.. 

8.— Connecticut at Ambers! 
15,— < >o«'" 
81, I'niversily ol Vermont at 

Bnrllogtoa, Vi. 

22. -Mid.llehuiy, at Midillebui y. 

Yt. 
88,— Harvard IniwiMty at Cam- 
bridge. 
27' — Mass. Inst. Technology at 

Cain bridge 
88.— Amherst at Amheisl College 

3.— st.vens lost I tale at Amherst 
" 5.— New Hampshire Mate at 

Amherst 
" 11 —Connecticut State at Storrs. 

Conn., 
" 12. — Wesle.van at BtddletOWB 

•• 18, -Mass.. Institute Technology 
at Ambers! 

" 24. -St. Lawrence I'niversily at 
A mherst 
March 4. Tufts at Bedford 
" 5. N m !!.. 1 -hue BtaU at 
Durham, N. II., 
.Ian. 15. Is opea cause.i by Bbods 

Island Stale's cancellal ion. 

The sqnad is holdlag dally praetles 

with Coach Gore and is sbowlag rOTJ 

m,,o«I form and exceptional speed. The 
■quad to date ..insists of Captain 

Cowdy, Bala, Tbompsoa, Bosar, A. W. 

Smiih, Ball, (lark, Mac-Anile. Hooper, 

Alexander, Brajaoa, Tomey ami Bersb- 

man. 



FRESHMAN ELECTIONS 



At the Freshman .-lass aseetiag held 
last Tuesday eveolog in (lark Ball, the 
folloaiag membem were elected as 
officers for tbe second term: Presideot, 

M|Kenuelh Salmon, of N'ee.lliam: vi.e- 
presi.lent,l{iisscl \'.,yes,of Newlonvillc: 
secretary, Theodore M. Chase. Milton : 
treasurer. Charles \V. Steele-, of Marhle- 

hea.l : ■ergeaot-at-enos, Chariea .1. Taw- 
bill, of Florence; captain, Kdinund Per- 
rar.ti, of Wc-st BrigOWater; elan his- 
torian. Miss Both Wood, of North 
Andover. 



Prominent Authority on Labor Speaks 
at Sunday Chapel. 

At Sunday Chapel. Dec-. 12. Mr. 
Charles I.. Mel/.le of New York City, 
made one more addition to thenumher 
Of line speakers heard at college I his 

fall. Br. stei/ie did sot go lo college; 

he received his education for his life 
work in an Fast Side machine shop 

Be Is still a member of lbs Machinists' 

Colon; hut bfl has risen to I ie of 

the foremost authorities on lahor prob- 
lems in the United Stales. 

Takinif "Radicalism" as his subject, 
Mr. Btelslfl said in pari : "In this 
•Igotflcanl Igfl we art; not only Baking 
a nation, we are reshaping the world. 

one andsrlylng feet is elear this li 
the last stragglfl lor democracy, Both- 

lag ran stop the march of industrial 
democracy; the labor union is a mere 
instance of It, and it this were aholished 
Something worse would take; ils place. 

The labor agitator was not theeanet 

Of all tbfl lahor troiihle; he himself 
grew out of this troiihle. We are not 
ho much concerned today with tbfl 1 td- 
i.-alisth as with tiie eonservatlves, those 

who have not J el learned the lesson of 
supremacy of the common people-, a 

condition which is Inevitable. 

Tbfl American Federation of Labor 

has beea a grand bulwark sgalast Hol- 

shevism iii ihis country. Then there 
arc oilier forces at work. The public 

library has become ■ great Influence la 

the education ot the common workman. 
The art naileries in the cities must also 
bfl considered. When a man comes out 

of an art gallery, be see-s the e omn soa 

things ahoul him in a iiiuc-h clille-reiii 

light than before. Bui tbfl greatest 

leveller ol classe-s. affecting us all. is 
I he public school. 

Badlealtsm is not s lead thing, The 

church has l.ee-n the greatest radical 

sgilstor throughout history; mission- 
aries .ause radicalism, for when foreign 

Continued cm p8K« 6 



ANNUAL 



Boston Concert 

COPLEY PLAZA HOTEL 

Jan. 1, 1921 

8-00 P. M. 



INFORMAL- 



TICKETS, $2.75 PER COUPLE 
Dancing After the Concert. 



PECK '22 ELECTED MANAGER 
OF VARSITY FOOTBALL 

At assembly Wednesday afleri n, 

William II. I'eck of Stow, Mass., was 

elected manager of fbs varsity football 

team for tbfl season of 10fl . 

I'eck is a graduate of Stow High 
School and entered Aggtfl Ifl the class 
Of 10S8, whe-ii the S. A. T. C. hroke up. 
He- has since heen an ae-tive member of 
that class. His freshman year he was 

elected resnagei of the; class tennii 

i team and was I member of his class 
rille team. He- ISSlsOOH the- li»22 Index 

Board. As assistant manager this fall 
he became popular with tbe foothaii 

tqaad sad his election to tbfl manager- 
ship is proof of his position in the 
st udent ho.lv. 

I'eck is a member of the- Lambda Chi 

Alfdia fraternity. 



Three Veterans, Wealth of New Ma- 
terial, New Rink, and Good Sched- 
ule Complete Bright Prospects. 

'This wi r. it present judical ions are 

to he relied upon, hockey is to assume 

a more Important position amoag A^ie 

spoils than it has hcrelolore held. 

The new rink is n<>v\ completed and 
will present a battel surlacc and 
will climate to I larjje e Mint I he- un- 
certainty which baa baadleapped leaaaa 
in the pasi wh.i win- dependent on the 
pond. 

The Athletic Department is boosting 

hockey and doing much to gel things 
underway. Besldflfl tbfl varsity team 
it is planned lo suhsl il ule- a tsrlflfl "t 
games for tbfl annual Freshman -Sopho- 
more halt Ie. 

M. A. «'. has liirned .oil some noted 

hookey teams Is ibc past.bnt ihis year'i 

seven promises lo he; on a par with tbfl 
hest. Twe tity-live eandidalc-s have- re- 
ported to Coach llanasll and prellmln- 
wry practice Is sow being held regularly 

in Ihe Drill Hall Utttt] ihe ice will a I 
low the men lo ijel out doora. 

Captain McCarthy will hold down his 
old position at rtgbl wint; ami should 

■how at bis best this season. "Moo" is 

a product ol Arlington lli^h School ami 
while I hen- was placed on I he all-inter 
scholastic- team in 1916, Bfl now ranks 
as one of the- best winy men in Kastern 

collegiate hockey . 
Collins is enotber veteran who hails 

from Arlington and was on Ihe same 
inler-scholastic te-am with McCarthy 

"iiubiia" at |M>int is a etellar defense 
perform* r. 

'Sonny" IfnOSSll bc-sules COachlOR 
the- team will play at center position 
and il is safe 10 say that bfl can hold 
his own with Ihe best men in collegiate- 
hockey. Newell, last year an iindei 

study lo Deiahunt will probably be goal 

14-iid. He is captaiii-e-lcet of baseball 
and at guarding the net be- should piov. 
a "Dave" Buttriekwho was formerly all 
Intercollegiate goal tend, M. A. «". '17. 

Cotton, captain elect of fool ball is also 

a contender for thia position. Leavltt, 

i bfl star left winy of two seasons will bfl 

out of i he game on account of a renin! 

attack of typhoid fever. 

In addition to these veterans there i» 
a wealth of new material out and Home 
Of them are flhOWtng up particularly 
well. In this list are: Lyon 'li. Mallon 
'21, Snow 'il, Anderson 'Sl.CO omb fl '11, 

Hodgson 'IS, Gordon £•{, vTbittaker "'2;i. 
Terr ffi, Pleard t\\. Priced &\ and 

Hardy 'SS. 

Ifaaagei Beerfl has arrantfed a fin»> 
schedule whic-h includes trips to Boaton 
and New York and yaines with such 
teams as Boston College, M. I. T. an. I 
Dartmouth. There are also twogamefl 
with Amherst Collflgfl and tentative 
dates with Harvard and West Point, 

During tbe Cbrietmse vscstiea the 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 15, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 15, 1920. 



team will hold practice in the Boston 
Arena in older to yet in jjood condition 
for the first two Karnes with Amli'io 
and Dartmouth. After the Christinas 
vacation t he Freshman seven will prac- 
tice with the varsity, a plan which 
should henctit both teams. 

I'll*' schedule is as follows: 
•Ian. 12, Amherst at M. A. C. 

" 15, Dartmouth at Hanover. 

" 21, Open date. 

" 22, Tufts at Boston. 

" 27, Colgate at Hamilton, N. Y. 

" 28. Hamilton at Clinton, N. Y. 

" IB, Kennsalaer at Troy. 
Fcl». 2. Bpriogfteld at S|>rinnlield. 

" 3, Tufts at M. A. C. 

" 5, Boston College at M. A. 0. 

" 1>. Amherst at 1'ratt Kink. 

11, M. 1. T. at Boston. 

12, Boston College at Uostoll. 
17, Dartmouth at M. A. 0. 



o 



ijraduates went into business; this num- 
mer has lately diminished so that nearly 
80 per cent are now fotaf into some 
sort of agricultural work and a mere 20 
percent into husiness. Yet outsiders 
are still suKUestiny that we give up the 
agricultural courses for general work. 

Our problems are constantly cbanu- 
|Bg, hut our leaders are trying always to 
work out fundamental principles. The 
htudenls often misunderstand the prob- 
lem! of t lie faculty ; likewise the faculty 
may fail to see things from the point 
of view of the student. In the college 
of the future there must he a larger 
interest in all of the prohlems by all 
concerned. 

FIRST SOCIAL UNION EVENT 
PLEASES LARGE AUDIENCE 



CALL ISSUED FOR 

FOOTBALL CANDIDATES 



PREXY TRACES EARLY 

HISTORY OF COLLEGE 



c views Aggie Problems in Assem- 
bly Talk. 

President liuttertield, speaking to the 
student body at Wednesday assembly, 
Dec. 8. outlined some of the main prob- 
lems which today ( front the colleges. 

Various alumni, in talking with l'rexy, 
liave assured him that athletic fame is 
by no incun- the limit of their interest 
in Aunic; they appreciate the larger 
problems here, and are willing to help 

in any way . 

V hrief historical survey shows that 
in 1K;Y7 Michigan A gu'ic Ik came the liisl 
college ol agriculluie in the country. 
S.m.ii afit-i , I he Morrell Ac! was passe. I 
giving each state in the Union a certain 
amount ol laud, with the revenue from 
which state colleges have been formed. 
This law provided for instruction in ag- 
riculture, mechanic arts, home econo- 
mics. However, owing lo t he establish- 
ment of fcf. I. T.. which receives one- 
third of the revenue from Massachu- 
setts, this college stands alone in the 
country as having remained purely 
agricultural. 

Formerly very little practical agricul- 
ture was taught in any college, because 
the investigators had no material to 
hand over to the teachers. Now, due 
to the extetisive work of the experi- 
ment stations connected with the state 
colleges, thorough helpful courses may 
be presented to the student. The work 
of the research man, of whom we have 
several here, is fundamental, since ap- 
plied science is tbe key to all our teach- 
ing. 

Another important branch of work at 
state colleges is tbe extension service, 
which, in this state, is working in co- 
operation with the county farm bureaus 
to reach the farmers throughout the 
state. Extension service has grown 
steadily in importance since its inau- 
guration in Michigan in 1801. 

The leaching at Aggie follows the 
theory that the courses must deal with 
the problems of citizenship and of life 
as well as of one's occupation. The 
first two years' courses are general in 
nature, and are required of all stu- 
dents alike. The last two years' work 
is more specialized and is governed now 
by the "major" system. 

Then there is the question of salaries. 
Last year their was a 12 per cent in. 
crease here as opposed to a much greater 
increase elsew -here : t h is year simply a 
10 per cent increase is being asked. 
There is also the building problem; 
nothing need be said of this need, for it 
is apparent to any visitor on the campus. 
Dp to 10 years ago, 50 per cent of Aggie 



The first of a series of entertainments 
to he given by tbe Social Union was 
held last Friday evening, December 10, 
in the Uowker Auditorium. Stockbridge 
Hall, and was attended by an audience 
of over :UH) persons, consisting of stu- 
dents anil townfolk. 

The entertainment was in the form of 
■ dramatic reading of Charles Dickins' 
famous novel, "(ireat V.\ pectaiions' and 
was rendered by Mr. IM.idelah Uice, 
who represented the versatile cast of 
characters most successfully. The 
reader was obliged to present a variety 
ol , I, aracters.froin that of a sweet-voiced 
girl to that of the husky blacksmith. 
His control was of the best. He was 
especially good in bringing out the 
character ol the lawyer, and of Tips 
sister. 



Seniors Emplasize the Need of a 
Large Squad. Eighty-six Re- 
spond to Call. 

Following Wednesday Assembly a 
call was sent out for men to sign up for 
next year's football team. Captain- 
elect Cotton and the senior members of 
the team each spoke a few words in re- 
gard to the team and its future. 

Captain Boole outlined the program 
for the coming year and emphasized the 
need of a sciuad of at least 7". men, inas- 
much as new material must be pro- 
duced to offset the loss of eight letter 
men who will graduate this year. 
"(Fid" Mackintosh said that football not 
only developed a man physically but 
also mentally, and it would benetit 
every man's education to go out for the 
team. "Don" Lent suggested that since 
eo-eds were fairly numerous it would 
be a good idea for them to do the cheer- 
ing in the future and let all the men go 
out for the team. Marr King gave 
three reasons why a man should go out 



for the team; principally because even 
man who went out could help toward 
the success of the team in some w 
and at the same time learn the game of 
football. He also emphasized the fact 
that too many men of ability wait until 
their last year before trying to can. 
their letter, and as a result their - 
vices are lost to the team. "Tabby" 
Long gave the real talk of the after- 
noon, but at that said he had forgotten 
hall what he had plauned to - 
"Tubby" has been out for the vat 
every year and though he has newr 
beta on the lirst team, he was awarded 
bis letter as a result of his hard work 
MCtl season. George Cotton, capta n 
elect, said that as tbe team would ba 
much lighter next year than for sum,- 
time, the light men as well as the 
heavy would have a very good oppor- 
tunity of winning their coveted M. 

In response to the call for candidates 
hO men signed their intention of K«»>'»g 
out for football next season. 



'20. — (i. B. Crafts is with the Bowker 
Insecticide Company, with territory in 
Maryland. 



POMOLOGY TEAM TAKES 

THIRD PLACE AT COLUMBUS 



Oeer '21 Places Second in Individual 
Scores. 



A SPECIAL SUIT 

Single or double breasted in a cheerful brown effect, cut form-fitting, at $50 
for young men. Hand tailored— character in every curve. Individuality 
in every line. Overcoats in very snappy models from $40 to $75. 



Aggie ranked third in the apple judg- 
ing contest at the international meet 
held at the exposition grounds at Co- 
lumbus, Ohoi, Dec. 2. The meet is an 
annual affair and was held in connec- 
tion with the American Pomology So- 
ciety and the State Fruit Show. There 
wasawonueifnl display of fruit from 
all states of the nnion and also varieties 
trom Fngland. Nova Scotia, and Ontario. 
The fruit judging team, consisting of 
three Seniors majoring in Fomology, 
(Jeer, Mallon, and Feck, made a very 
creditable showing on their recent trip 
to Columbus, Ohio, where, on Thurs- 
day. Dec. 2, they judged at the Ohio 
State Pomology Show. Out of live 
teams, Maisachusetts stood third, while 
in the individual scoring (leer placed 
second, Peck eighth. Mallon thirteenth. 
The standing of tbe teams (with a 
possibility of each team getting 10,800 
points): 

Ohio, 

New York, 
Massachusetts, 
Iowa, 
Ontario, 
The standing of the rive highest men 
(with a possibility of each man getting 

3ti00 points): 

Laisy (Ohio), 
Geer (Mass.), 
Niles (Iowa), 
Howlett (N. Y.) 
Almey (Ontario), 



MEREITT CLARK & CO. 

Horn* ot Mart Schmftner * Marx OMhmm 

\r • c.,^» Northampton 

144 Main Street, r _ 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KK8 IN 

DRV AND FANCV GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Candy Shop 



Soda Parlor 



BECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Maaaachuaettt 



i>443f 

9'270 

91881 

8H7tti 
8813J 



89881 

31761 
3143i 
81881 

3130 



E. A. Thompson of Amherst, has been 
obtained to overhaul the large portraits 
of the college presidents, in the reading 
room. Each portrait is to be removed 
from its frame, and the whole thing is 
to be cleaned and put into ship-shape 
condition. 



When Vou Are Down Town 

DROP IN 

The Candy Kitchen 

— FOR — 

Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



u 



The Home of Sweets 



» 



HAVE YOU THOUGHT 

flow handy it is to drop into the Aggie Inn for a bite and your smokes 
when on the way to those morning classes? 

AGGIE INN 

For the convenience of Aggie men. 



MUSICAL CLUBS GIVE 

EXCELLENT PROGRAM 



First Concert is Greatly Appreciated 
by Hadley Audience. 

The combined Musical Clubs held 
1 heir first concert of tbe .year at the 
Hadley Town Hall last Friday evening. 
The program was executed in tine style 
throughout and for the first concert it 
was undoubtedly ihe besl program in 
years. A great deal of credit is due to 
Mr. Worth ley ami Mr. Kat/.enbioh for 
their able work in coaching. 

"The Sword of Ferrara", sung by the 
OlM flub was prei-ented wilh much 
■kill. The opening phrase sung loudly 
was succeeded by varying soft and loud 
tones the whole club ended with gieai 
volume and laappiBMaoi "in Spain". 
In direct contrast to the last two years, 
this <dub is singing six snappy songs 
with nothing which will allow sleep iii 
the audience. "A Calamity*', sung ai 
the opening of t he. second part ffMI 
i;iiise for much laiighier by the specta- 
tor*. 

The Mandolin Club shoyvs great im 
piovement over last year. A college 
medley and a medley of popular pieces 
were delivered with the necessary pep 
and jazz aft that the young folks could 
scarcely wait for the dance afterward. 
The Hikers" and 'Chain of Daises " 
also came in for prolonged applause. 

I.ahrovitz and Viuten with their man- 
dolins played several ".Scraps" which 
more than delighted the audience. 
They were very good. 

Davidson, in Scotch Highlander cos- 
tume, managed a numerous solo en- 
titled "A Little Scotch". 

The quartet composed of Sloan, Coil. 
Viuten and Haslain was very good. 
They responded to three encores. 
I he program : 



MUSICAL CLUBS TO MAKE 

ANNUAL BOSTON TRIP 



Mm h. 'The Hikers" 


Wci.lt 


.Mandolin (lub 




"Bwtri of Kerrara" 


Kullard 


(ilee Club 




'si raj*', 


Selei tcil 


Labruvitz and Viuten 




\ Little Scotch" 


Heleiteil 


Davidson 




"< liain of Daises" 


Weiilt 


Mandolin Club 




\ < alamity" 


Sjkjss 


<; lee Crab 




I lie Kour Fandools" 


Selected 


Quartette 




1 "ileife Medley" 




Arranged by Coach Katzenku li 


.Mandolin ("lab 




"OB The Road to Mandalay" 


ttlieaks 


lilee Club 




"Son of old Massachusetts" 


Knight '01? 


Combined Clubs 




Dancing until 12 was in 


order after 


the concert. 





Will Give Series of Concerts During 
Christmas Vacation. 

The Annual Alumni concert will be 
held at Ihe Copley I'la/a Hotel, liostoti, 

January 1st at B-00 o'clock. Aaaninao- 

valion this concert will be informal Ibis 
year, and a large number ol undeigiad- 
uates ate expected t<> attend, as well as 
alumni. Tickets will be #8.76 a couple. 

The scheiiiile of conceits as arranged 
to data is as follows: 

Needham, Dec. ltd. 

stow. Dae. :d m Dec. •_".!. 

Copley Plana. Hotel. Boston, Jan. 1. 

Creenlichl, I'Yb. :t. 

Auditorium, II. A . (.'.. Feb. A. 

A inhelsl Tow n Ball, Feb. 15. 

Other concerts will be announced 
later. Arrangements are being made 
tola joint concert with Mt. Holyokc 
College and for a concert in Northamp- 
ton. The Musical Hubs will furnish 
Ihe I'roin Cabaret this year, as usual. 

It is planned to end Ihe season with 
tbe second li-rni. as interest always lags 
dining Ihe I bird term. 



The management for this season is: 
I " ulty Manager Frank P. Bend 

Manager Frederic Howard 

laat. Manager John Lowery 

lei of Glee Club Howard M. Cotf 
Leader of Mandolin Club Kdward B. 

Labrovitz 
leader of Quartette C. Raymond Viuten 



There will be a meeting of the New 
r-'igland Fruitgrowers Association in 
Wilder Hall, Dec. 20-21. One of the 
purposes of this meeting is to decide on 
a 10-year program for apple growing in 
Massachusetts, including both produc- 
1 and marketing, with special empha- 
sis on the latter. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 



SKK <>Uk LINK OK 



1924 



BASKETBALL 
BEGINS 



PRACTICE 



The initial call lor candidates for the 
Freshmen basketball team was made 
last Wednesday. Dec. l.tinl a sipiad ol 
22 men reported for the liisl practice. 
There is a wealth of ex periiiiental ma- 
terial, with several prep school captains 
in the sipiad, ami the outlook for a suc- 
cessful team seems in bfl more promis- 
ing than usual at the lirst ot the season. 

Among tbe candidate* aie hike, cap- 
tain of I be LttO West held High learn, 
liilski, captain of Hopkins Academy, 
which won the championship in (he 
Hampshire County League last season, 

Bronner, of Peddle Institute, Hutebina 

ol Arms Academy and Barker and Fei 
ranliof West Bridgwater, whose team 
were the North Shore champions last 
winter. Westlield High has three 
representatives on the squad :— Bike. 
Kane, and Barllell. Ball. '20, is act ing 
as freshman coach since the resigtia 
lion of .lakeuian. 

The schedule for this season has not 
as yet been completed, but will call lor 
12 games with the leading high and 
prep schools in the valley. As arranged 
so far it is as follows : 

.Ian. 21, Hartford at Hartford. 

.Jan. 20, Cushmg at Cuahing. 

Jan. 20, Sm i Hi Academy at Amherst 
(pending). 

Feb. .'1. Willisloii at Fasthampton. 

Kch. 12, Hartford at Amherst. 

Feb. 2.*., Deeilieldat Decrlield. 

DR. SEERLEY OPENS SERIES 

OF HYGIENE LECTURES. 

Contrary to previous years. Dr. B ee r - 
ley ia brought here this season under 
the auspices of the Department ol Phys- 
ical Education Of the college In conse- 
quence of this, all Freshmen are re- 
quired to attend Ihe lectures, while 
the rest of tbe student body is cordially 
invited. 

'10. -C. O. Mattoon is working in the 
PeiraOB Hardware Co., I'ittsheld. He 
was recently married. 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

K«T*»i.i.i.»l. I MltS 

Stkphkn Land FoXjOBB. taaa>i 

XUNI'HI'rl'HINII JKWMI.KKH 
ISO HKOA1IWAY, NKW VOUK 

OTA7B AND OOXXJBOB 
I'INH AND RQtea «* 

GOLD, MII.VMK AMI) HKONZM MH|IAIJ> 



Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hos.e for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A good 
assoitnu-nt of colorings, exct lien 1 
qualities and reaaonabl) pricei 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 



G. EDWARD FISI EI 



THE 
DRAPER HOTFL 

Northampton, Mass 



Suits Pressed, 65cj Tne Leader for College Bauq«eti 

on Sanitary Pressing Machine. 



LABROVITZ, 11 Amity Street 



Wm. M. Kimball, Proi 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 
LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

%i Rea$onablt in dollars and stti^r." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield, Mass. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOI 



ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



F*e»«:e'fci> Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 

MOEANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 
Manufacturers institution Cooking Apparatus 



of 

86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTfif 



£«\rp<{ivter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherat, Maaa 



The Mamchuaetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 15, 1920. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 15, 1920. 



/ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEulAN 



IMiblUiied every Wednesday >>y the 
Btud«ntl of Dip MuMCBUMtta Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOABU OK EDITOaa. 



I. a. ur.v. i P. Ma.c.in ".'1. K.litor-tn-Chlef 

K..MKKI I.. Jonkh "21 Manaitinif Kdltor 

A-BOCIATK KlUrOKH. 
0«<>b''! V. . Bum an '21 

KK.NNttTH A. lUKNAIlD « 

siANi.itv w. g a o w . ni "-"-' 

I'M I. I.. I?t KNKTT VI 

lioitAiti w. Braise "ei 

ItK.I.IHNO V. .lACKHON "22 

Juki m. Wiimn "at 

1.. IS. AlCKINHTnN *■ 



The Chemistry, Landscape and agri- 
cultural Kcoiioiniis Clnb* should he 
mentioned. 411 Ol these could he 
broug&t to l it*- i»y developing; programs 
of general Interest and by giving then 
timely publicity el tbe ntgenl kind. 
The Animal Husbandry and Pomology 
< lulls of last year are examples i>f Ihe 
height! which orgaalsatloni of tins type 
may attain. The material is there fur 
those who do tbe necessary work of 
bringing it before the Btndent body. 



BUBINKRB DKPAKTMF.NT. 
Hkkhkkt I.. Ok mi '21. lUmlneaa Manager 

Evkimii C. n!Ksi..N'2l AdverttaliiB Manager 
Chak.ks A. BCC« -!■•. Circulation Manager 

my kon «•■ Kb en** '22 

Hol.llKN WlllTTAKKIt '28 

OWBS K. I'ol.BOM "28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copiea, 10 centH. Make all Ofden paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Bnteredatteconrt-rlaaa matter at the Amherst 
Pott Office. A.--."|.t.- 1 | for niftillni: Si eyeeM 
rate of pontiige |.r..v|.leil for in ne.tlon 1108. Act 
of October. 1917 iiutlwrUed August '20. 1918. 



The editor does not wish to "raz/." 
any of the organizations mentioned. 
He is attempting in a public way to 
bring to the attention of those leaders 
involved,! he fact that they are allowing 
worthwhile organizations to die. Of at 
least to sink Into the limbo of partial 
or even total oblivion. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

WlUNKSHA V, DSC. IB. 

County Agent Conference. 

:j-(K) i'. m. — Assembly, student debate 
6-80 P. m. -Dr. Seeley, llowker Audi- 
torium. 
Till KBI) vv, DlC. I*. 
County Agent Conference. 
tt-30 p. M.— Dr. Seeley, Bowker Audi- 
torium. 
7-tM) p. m. — Baud rehearsal. 
Fkiiiav, Dk< . 17. 

7-40 a. m.— Chapel. 

County Agent Conference. 

Poultry Show. 
SA'II lil'W, Di«. 1H. 

Poultry Show. 
Mettawampe Trek. 
M-(K) p, m. -Student Vaudeville, Bow- 
ker Auditorium. 



E. E. GRAYSON 17 

LEAVES BACHELOR RANKS 

Kmory Qmyson T7, well known on 
campus as football coach, and two-year 
mentor, was married last Friday eve- 
ning to Miss Sus ; e Squire* of Belcher- 
town. Mrs. Craysoii is the sister of 
Paul Severe Squires, M. A. C '17. The 
Bret knowledge of the wedding, even 
to "Kin's" most intimate friends in 
Amherst, came Monday at a formal 
announcement following the ceremony. 



Tuk next issue ol Ihe Cw.i.kuian will 
appear January 11, 19H. 



Tuk coi.i.koian staff extends it« most 
cordial wishes for a merry Christinas 
and a happy New Year to the alumni, 
student body, and faculty of M. A. C. 



DormantP 

Where are the informals of years 
none by.' Why has there been but 
one informal this year? Why has there 
not been made a serious attempt to 
have an informal Saturday in conjunc- 
tion with the student vaudeville '.' Why 
has there been but two meetings of the 
informal committee this past fall?. 

The questions end more Pke them are 
being agitated in the minds of many of 
the students. The natural reaction has 
been the increasing numherof fraternity 
house dances w hieh have been held dat- 
ing the past two weeks. There is no 
doubt but that the substitution of house 
dances for Ihe general college dance 
tends to create the "cliquey" spirit 
within the group. This is to be avoided 
at M. AC. The various ditliculties of 
holding informals could be remedied 
by a definite policy of forcsighted man- 
agement. The Informal committee is 
asleep on a job which carries with il a 
real responsibility of upholding of dem- 
ocratic ideals. 



Along the same line might be noted 
the inactivity of other organizations on 
the campus. Adelphia, composed of 
the foremost men in the senior class. 
has not held a meeting since before the 
last student forum. There is much 
work for it to do in the guidance and 

expression of stadednt opinion. 

Phi Rappn Phi, made up of those of 
superior scholastic attainments, could 
and should take an active part in stu- 
dent affairs. Its present program con- 
sists essentially of the election of new 
member! and the mbeeuuent banquet. 
Surely men of brains of Phi Kappa Phi 
calibre could do more to foster the 
ideal scholarship than liy mere elec- 
tions. What has become of Le Cercle 
Francais? Why not an English Club 
or a Spanish Group? 



COMMUNICATION 

To Tin; BDITOB 0» tuk. Coi.i.koian : 

Finals in less than a week; examina- 
tions that will test all of us, and of 
which we are all thinking considerably 
about at the present time. But our ex- 
atiiinations % are not the only tests that 
are to come during these finals. There 
are two tests one of which the majority 
has perhaps thought little SDOUl. The 

Smt Is the Honor Bystem; tbe second, 
t he freshmen. 

The crucial moment for the Honor 

System and the I' res I n is at hand. If 

the freshmen can pass their finals this 
term, the roughest part of the trail to 
their degrees has been covered. If they 
can live up to the ideals set forth in the 
Honor Constitution at this time, the 
Honor System will have passed over 
the roughest p art of its trail in its re- 
lation to the class of MM. For ' his lirst 
term, Ihe freshmen have been on trial, 
and the finals will prove whether they 
are true Aggie men of strength and 
character, for at no other time is the 
temptation to crib so hard 10 conquer. 

Freshmen, watch your step. We want 
every man of you tti slay with us, but 
If you can remain only by soiling our 
character, we don't want you! We want 
good, wholesome virile men at Aggie, 
and honesty is our first requisite from 
you. If you break our trust by infring- 
ing upon t tie Honor System Constitu- 
tion, you are undermining the bulwark 
of the atmosphere of honesty that we 
are trying to build up in our relations 
in the class room and on the campus. 
The College does not want to have its 
Honor Council force any man to leave 
College, for we need you and you need 
us. 

Therefore, freshmen, every man of 
you make up your mind to show us that 
you can be trusted, that you are real 
men who will stand by the Honor Sys- 
tem and uphold the Honor of M. A. C. 
the cause she has given you to uphold. 

If you Hunk out if you die, let it be 

an honorable death and not a disgrace- 
ful one. 

(Signed) P. J. Cab* 10, 
President of the Honor Council, 



Sl'NUAY, Dae. 1». 

ii-iti a. m. -Sunday Chapel, Profeseoi 
Albert Bunnell Hart, Har- 
vard University. 

Hobday, Date. 20. 
New England Fruit Biowers 1 
Association Meeting. 
7-50 a. m.— Final examinations begin. 

li BSD kl , D«C. W. 

New England Fruit Growers' 

Association Meeting. 

140 p. m.— Special Assembly, Pilgrim 
Centennial Program. Speak* 
ei, Pres. I.. H. Murlin of 
Boston University. 

Till KSDAY, Df« . fg. 

5-00 p. m.— Fall term ends. 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 



Hat. at 3 

Eve. 2 shows 

6-45,8*30 



Friday 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eve.- 2Sli"\\s 

6-45.8-30 



SI I'KIM'KOIMITION DAY I 

John Barrymore, Hartha 

Mansfield and Nita Naldi in 

"Dr. Jehyll and Mr. Hyde." 

from Robert l.otiia Ste\en 
son's world famous drama of 
lev! iiiul dual identity. The 
greatest piece of ctiaiai tci 
acting ever filmed. 
New* Mutt and Jeff Topics 
Mat. 17c. 22c Kve. 28c. 33c 

Dorothy Da 1 to n In 
"L'Apache." An amazingly 
\iviit picture of tnenUbt life 
of parte— of the "apBedere*' 
in garteb cafea. of thestrantre 
"half-world" of the fierce 

Snathes 

Scenic reel 

•.reel Haelt Sennett Comedy 

Billie Burke in "Away 
Goes Prudence." A madcap 
romance of laiiuliH and ex- 
citement that takes the 
' prude" out of Prudence. 

Newt Weekly _ „ 

2-rct-l Fox Comedy 



.. , Olive Thomas in "The 

Monday Flapper." Knoseh real ha- 

mnr to keep von chuckling— 

enough real drama to keep 

toe Interested 

Hat. at 3 Pathe Review 2 reel Chrit- 

Eve. at 8 t j e Comedy/'Seaside sirens." 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real Bargains In 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this BALI I 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. 1 >n your way up town. 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men taught to lead by unickest methods. 
Inquiries ml Mill* Studio, 

P. O. Hullding. l'hone 4S6-K 




Conn. General 

Life Ins. Co. 

•f 

IIAlil lOHI). CONSECTICUT 

placed over $100,000 INSUR- 
ANCE on M. A. C Students in 
1919-1920. 



OVER THREE-FOURTHS M, A. C. 
STAFF 

have insured with this company. 



IMPORTANT SOPHOMORES 



Competition for the 1»2:5 Index Board 
will start now. 

Men will compete for one or more of 
the department heads listed below. The 
business manager and editor-in-chief 
with the department heads will be 
picked from the competitors. 

All competitors Bee II. W. Spring or 
1J. f, Jackson at once. 

Departments: 

Literary, Statistical, Art, Photogra- 
phy, Advertising, Sales and Collections 
and Business Department Photography. 



Why bow to a high priced 
tailor? 

In fabrics- our evening suits 
are identical. 

Fit ? You see fa. yourself. 

Price? About half. 

The best of everything college 
men wear. 

Special " Shopping Ser\ice" 
for orders by mail. 

Rogers Pert Company 

Broadway 
at 34th St. 



You can carry $5000 converti- 
ble Life Insurance for / years 
at a quarterly cost of $11.00 
{age 20) 



Broadway 
at 13th St. 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 



Full information on planning 
your insurance for the present 
and future gladly furnt shed. 



Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren at 4tst St. 

NEW YOKK CITY 



H. E. ROBBINS 

Amherst, Mass. Tel. 442-R 




COMPARISONS ARE ODIOUS THE EXCEPTION PROVES THE RULE 

VI 'T ANY havo alrefeaV compared our suits mid overcoat* with fliose 
^1 i offered In <li«' eltieo. Why waste your lime and effort? liny h«*r<« 
before you j»o home and i»et what you Wftat moderately priced, lie- 
memher WALSH is here all the time to live up to every guarantee. 




ANNUAL STUDENT VAUDE- 
VILLE ON DECEMBER 18 

The annual student vaudeville ihon 

will be itaced December 18, at 840 p. I 

M.. ill Bowker auditorium. There are 
to be twelve acts, Including I variety ol 
bright music, fancy dames heart- 

thrilling stunts, and other added 

attractions. 

Dress rehearsal takes place Thursday 
evening, starting at 7-imi sirup. Bach 
fraternity will report for its set at tbe 

time announced in assembly. It is ab- 
solutely ncoeasaq for ever] fraternity 

putting OS an act lO be present at this 
rehearsal. 

Jack Smith will appear In one ol his 
fantastic roles, and a wortbj substitute 

has been loiind who will attempt to fill 
Cohen Leavitt'i ibuee. "Bob" Junes 
will make a startling appearance In a 

snappy new dance. Nat Ames is to 
make hi! debut as an Easl side jugaler, 



NEW HOCKEY RINK 

IS COMPLETED 

As a result ol 1 be new bockej link 

which has reeentlj been completed, 
prosrtecti look bright for Aggie com- 
pleting her schedule oi home uockej 
gamei during Ihe coming year. 

In former years, a rink has been eel 
off on tbe college pond, but the eimwa 

which have been cleared and banked 
outside the rink have caused the Ice IO 

crack. Difficult j has b1«o always beeu 
experienced lu flooding the top of tbe 
pond for new ice. 

The new rini isted noi 1 h 1 

of t be ai bletic field near t be brook | 
and its construction has been made pos 
sildc by grading with material from tbe 
lite of* Ihe Memorial Building. The 
rink can be flooded from ! bydrani con 
neeted nil h the si reel main. 

In the spring, 1 he space non occupied 
by the rink will be utilised eithei foi 
tennis ur for held ho, 'key for tbe 



LAND GRANT COLLEGE 

CONFERENCE AT M. A C. 

'The meeting ol president! and 

trustee! ol tbe Hea England land graol 

college! was in session at M. A. <"., 
Dec. M> and 11. Fi iuay and Saturda.s 

mora tnga were epent visiting tbe n 

rioiis di'pai'liuenis. Diniiel was served 
to the delegation In Draper Hall r'rida.v 
evening, and question! of mutual in- 
terest to the different college! were 
discussed. Conference! were held Bat- 

urdaj morning, 

'This meeting was the first of a aerie! 

of like < ferences, to be held regular!) 

at i he land grant college 

The following men sttendi I the meet- 
Ing: New Hampshire, Mr. i:. D. Hetael, 
president, Mr. Pelkef and Ur. Daniel, 
trusteea; Bhode Island, Mr, Edwards, 

president. Mr. Banger and Mi. Math, w 

■on, trustees: Connecticut, Mr, C. b. 
Beach, president, trnd Mr, Longely, 



treasurer; M. A. C„ Mr. K. I.. Butter- 
field, presldeut, Mr. Prost, Mr, Uleaeon, 

Mr. Howe, ami Mr. Bowditob, Irusleis. 

S. S. HYDE 

opt U'lini mill Je w eler 

'.' I'leawint Street di|i one flight 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Bis Ben Alarm Clocks 

AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

iniiy i anteed 

N0VICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 










MARK 



WHAT man doesn't like his pipe? There's nothing whets 
your smoke desires like seeing a good pipe lying around. 
Because you know that in it is the only real smoke satisfaction. 
Your appetite will he doubly whetted if it is a W DC, because in 
W D C Pipes all the sweetness and mellowness of the genuine 
French briar is brought out by our own special seasoning process. 
Then too, WDC Pipes are good to look at. I he designs are 
pleating and workmanship perfect. You'll agree with us that our 
craftsmen are accomplishing their purpose-to make pipe, that 
are without peers in all the world. Ask any good dealer. Be 
sure and look for the Triangle trademark. It s a guarantee agamtt 
cracking or burning through. 

WM DEMUTH & CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLDS LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 







Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Seal I v and prom pi j done. 
Work called foi end delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



10 Pleasant St. 



lei. o j 



I 'miii .1 1) i Mhiiiil.i.i I ;ilV 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 
WHILE YOU WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Ambers) - - afaat. 

Students: Attention! 

FREE I Beautiful Calendar* tor 1B21 

Especially ordered for Fraternity 
Houses. Call eai ly before 

too 1st • 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 



E 



SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



6 



The MawachuaettB Collegkn, Wednesday, December^ 1920. 



HILLS BOTANICAL PRIZES 



in i he competition tor tke "ills Be 
tastes! prtsM the Jndfea save inidtd 
the first prise of |M to Mr. U B. Wood- 

Worth, an.l the sccoml prise of WB •" 

Mr. K. N. Tis.lale. The following 

Damn are recommended tor Honorable 

Mention: I.. B. ArringtoB, I- B. Dickin- 
son, I,. J.FHseatriek, Miss Mary Gilder- 
ntelatar. A. .1. Heath, Miss M. L. Uwli, 
i.. K. It. Undskoff, W, !■• Paddock, .1. 
I', sn.ii h,T. L. snow, it. G. Wendell. 
Bpeelal mention li ma.le "' [[u ' B * r ' 
barium of sUes D. P. Clark, graduate 

slmlcnt. 

Prom Ibe Ml «>t seventy-nine barbarla 
reoelvad from the class in Botany 35, 
twelve were •elected as of eneeptionsl 
merit and entered toreompetlllon. Pro- 
It More C. II. Thompeon, Gordon aad 

Harris. >n kiti.lly acted as Judge*. 

The Bllle priaae in Botaaj are *i*es 
aniuiaiiy ami awarded ai Commence- 
ment, for the beat two barbarla received 
m, 1. 1 naembere of the Ibrae apper 
elaaaaa. Theparlod for th<' preparatloa 

of the ragalar berbarl roqnlred of 

taeb siii.ifi.i in botany i.as been sa- 

leaded fr Jaaa to November. Tims 

all Bophomorcabaeome entitled t.. eater 
tbe eompetltloa for 1 1 » «- UlHe prises. 

rii.' membera of the class arc to be 
oommendad for the general excellence 
,,i tiicii eollectlona. With ao many 
ooateataata the eompeiitlon waaoeeea- 

saril.v very keen ami mans barbarla BOt 

entered for the prise are deecrvlag ol 
blgb credit. 
The }udgae gave particular atteattoa 

to id.- iw.-iiiy-iivc ■pectal ebeele pre- 
pared to iiinsnaic the general prledplce 
of morpbologj . 

Bedpieeti "t the prisea arc i>- be eon- 
uratttlated oa t hair ecat aeea, accuracy 

an.l originality : ami particularly on the 

excellent Interpretative and deecriptlve 
•beete appended to tbe epecimene. 



MIDWINTER ALUMNI 

DAY FEB. 4 AND 5. 



Winter Alumni Day called Huh year 
the Beml-cantennlal Wmtcr Alumni 

Day will DC held IVb. 4 ami ',. it was 
voted at the committee BBeettBg to clrop 

tbe formal alumni talks in classes but 
have alumni invited to attend the 
classes Friday. 
Friday morslag, Visit t.. elaaaaa aad 

inspection Of college. 
gvenlagi Complimentary alum- 

ni supper. 
7-00 p. m., John Kemlrick 15aii«s, 
followed by musical 

club concert. 

Satur.lav.iMKlA.M. Alumni maetlBg room 

U4 Btookbrldga Hall. 

lO-Iitl v. m.. Heating of alumni in- 

tereated ia athletlce, 
room 114 Btookbridge 

Hall. 
•i-tMl p. M., Hiit key Came. BOBtOB 

College vs. M. A. C. 
:uh> r. a., Baahetball game H. 

H. Stale vs. M. A. <'• 
Drill Hall. 
7-:ttl i'. M., Fraternity banquets 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing Q ur Bread 

Rolls and 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 15, 1920. 



Repairing 



Shins 



T. MIENTKA'S 



— THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first -class 



Pastry 



Just till the gap between 
supper and breakfast. 



Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing ^/ # B . DRURY 

|| Pleasant St., Amherst, Ma-*. 



In These Days of High Rrices 

Life Insurance is one of those few commodities that has not taken a jnmp 
upward in cost. CHARLES W. CURT1N, 2 McClellan St. Tel. $••>*. 

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Company^ 



Membera ol the Kolony Klub, com- 
posed of Bboft Coarae aad Two-year 
■ludent* beld ■ very ■ueeemful dance 

at Masonic Hall. Sat unlay SVenlng.Dec. 

11. Twenty-live eoiiplcs w.-ie present. 

The patroaa aad patroaeaaaa were 
Profeaaor ami Mrs. Pbelae, Mr. aad Mrs. 
\ eta, ami Mrs. .1. Bacbracb. The 
orcheetra una coa» poa ad of at. A. I 

men. I >av enj.ort . I.al.n.v it z. Adams, and 

Hunter, farniabed a program "t nrcl 
daaa dame music The committee in 
charge were sfessers. Newell, Baxter 
reaa, MacLeod, ami Hancock. The 
Klub i> planning to bold a >eiics ol 
similar dances during the winter. 

SUNDAY CHAPEL 

Continued from page 1 



PROF. PATTERSON TALKS ON 
CHARACTER OF LEADERSHIP 
Prof. Patteraoa gatra ;» rer| luterest- 

iDgtalkto chapel M«. inlay morning OB 

tbe "Character of Leadership la Onr 

i;,.|.resenta!ive Bodies.' 1 He declared 
that the nation It gaUfcd h.V men who 

ate not above tbe average intellectu- 
ally, that the ureal call was for men of 
such rallbrs, practical men hut not 
nivalis*. Explaining that these men 
are well adapted to run small alfairs 
successfully, be illustrated their inca- 
pacity for handling the lamer problema 
of the country. We tind that there are 
few men who haw achieved bag tblBga 

la oar aaacaabllea, Tbis brings ap the 
qaeatloo Of the practical man and the 
idealist. One tries to get all he can out 
Of the country, while the other works 
for its uplift. America is really an 
Ideal, aad ta going oa to higher ldeala. 

The community is not educating youiifj 
men so that they can cheat their BCigfa- 
bora, it tralna them In order thai they 
may better ttie wh.de community. This, 
I hen. is the reason for higher education. 



Selecting Types 

The vastly increased milk yield of the 
pure hied daily herd has vindicated the 

year.- of scientific study of Dairy prob- 
lema aad baa ale© established the prin- 
ciple that qnalltj li aVwajl economy. 

The distinctive and wholesome sani- 
tary cleanliness which the use of 



people sec the new light of Christ, they 

begin to bava aome aort of social an- 

rest. Hut this soci.il unrest is the 

deal bleaatag Ibal ever cornea to 

mankind. 

However, there ate certain elements 

in radicalism that must he overcome. 
There must be contidencc between the 

bees aad the workmen; now there 

M f as much crook. •.lne-s on one side 
„ ,»„.. other. There must be com- 
plete eo-OperatiOB ; tbe individual plans 
which concern-, are continually trying 
do not help much. Open toiutn discus- 
sion la alao Baeaaaary; the men should 
bare competent leaderahlp, la this, for 
,l,ev will diacuaa the queattone snjrwsy. 
Furthermore ,bot fa Ibe employer nnd em- 
ployee muel admit when I hey are wrong. 
There must be justice In both pnin-s 
\o matter what tbe ay Mem, it will 
work oat it are bold honor to God and 
respect tooor fallowmen above all else. 
•| h( . novation of "hat you and 1 SM 
individually will determine the qUOS- 
loa of our wh.de future lite 



WwTdottL 



C/eaner and C/eanser 



is providing to the Dairy Industry is 
likewise the result of years of seientilic 
study and careful selection. 

So consistent in protecting the deli- 
cate qualities of milk food is the use of 
Wyandotte Sanitary ( leaner and Clean- 
set proving that the results of increas.l 
milk production has been conserved to 
the Dairy Industry. 

An order on your supply house will 
convince you that with cleaners too, 
quality is economy. 

Indian in circle 




In every i>ku 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs.. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



Sheep Lined Coats from $14.00 up 
Leather Coats from $30.00 to $42.00 

Stylish, well-made, comfortable All Wool 

Overcoats in a «*»« lhat >' ou wi " like ' 
Specially priced from $35.00 to $55.00 

Most of these are 

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX MAKE 

Vou can easily make a few dollars by 
looking these over before you buy. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Hen for over 30 years 



E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers 

Rio o. «. rAT.orr. 

Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business fanner's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

»U.S.OI«eY OF THE MMM »O«.CULT0.«l CMCMIC*. CO««NT 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE 



b a • 



OF COURSE YOU DIDN'T 

Actually do your shopping early, but why not get it off your mind before you leave 

the campus ? Give a Conklin, a Waterman or a Moore Fountain Pen, or a Pearl M Pin 

or a Seal would certainly find favor. 

DO IT NOW ! 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Alberton Clark of Boston, won of 

PEN. W. N. Clark, li:is pmntij to tin. 

library several back iiumbcrs of L'lllux- 
trillion. 

l'res. C. S. Howe of tbe "ane Behool 
of Applied Science, Cleveland, Obio, 
M. A. C, '78, bah niven to tbe library a 
lot of colleKe history material, dealing 
witb tbe .period wben be was bere. 
The collection contains soinc wry inter 
cslinn and valuable papers, sii.b M 
Military Herniations, Schedules, and 
< ollene Periodicals. 

Professor Thayer of ibe Floricult uic 
Heparttnent was-at St. Anne.le Uellevue 
in Quebec on Dec. I, At Maidoiiald Col- 
leKe, and gave a lectin e before tbe I'oin- 
ological and Fruit tirowers' Society <>t 
tbe Province of Quebec. 

The Sophomore class held a PMfttlBg 
Thursday Dec. I at 4 i\ m. in ( lark 
Hall. The most important business 
was the election of two members for tbe 
Interclass Athletic Hoard. Of those 
nominated, Hates was elected. Alex 
auder and Smith lied which will necessi- 
tate another vote being taken. K. H. 
.I.ibnson was elected basketball mana- 
ger. A motion was carried that Newell 
'21 and Lewandowski '22 be thanked tor 
services rendered the class in the tl-inan 
rope pull and in football respectively. 

The Mettawampe Club will lake their 

THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Calleg* Jewelry ruff Links, ttoft collar IMni. 
l>r«M Hult Sets. Violin. Kanjo. Mandolin String 

Fine Watch Repairing, alio Broken Lento 

Replaced from nt ly. 

32 Main Street. Amhertt. Man. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



The man who buys a 

61 LAVAL 

is taking no chances. 



MOST any kind of cream sepa- 
rator will do fairly Rood work 
the first few months, when it is new. 

Bui if it is a cheaply made or in- 
ferior machine, after tbe first few 
months your trouble will begin. 

Why take chances when you come 
to select a machine that may mean 
so much in increasing the prolit from 
your cows? 

There is one cream separator that 
has been the acknowledged worlds 
standard for over 40 years. It's the 
.me cream separator that is used by 
the creamerymen almost exclusively. 
Dairy farmers the country over know 
the De Laval and its sterling quality. 
Kxperience has shown them that 

It I* thm bmmt cream mmpm- 
rmtor that money can buy. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR COMPANY 



NKW YORK 
166 Broadway 



CHICAGO 

29 E. Madison St. 



annual trek next Saturday. They will 
climb Mt. Toby from the south side. 
Alter the hike there will be a big din- 
ner at the l.athiop. in South Dceiiield. 

The January number of the Alumni 
Bulletin will have seseral fcatuies. 
Tlu-rc will be an all-Aggie football 
team, with the players selected from 
all the varsity teams since 1918, There 
will also be a special article on tlie ag- 
ricultural enrollment in New Kn^land 
colleges. Piof. l'helan will set forth 
the aims and parpoMM ol the Shod 
Course at M. A. C. in the same issue. 

The Q. T. V. fraternity held a house 
dance Saturday Dec. 11. Mr. ami Mrs. 
M. -flood of \mhelNl eha pel'oned the 

party which lasted from 8 to 12 aboatlS 

couples lieint: (iieseiii. The decorations 
were in red and white. I,i<jhl reliesh- 
ments were served during Ihe evening. 

V lew adventurous Aggie students 
were seen taking their first skate Mon- 
day morning. Monday atternoon one 
Of I he adv. ti' urers celebrated by break- 
ing through I he i.e. 

Lambda Chi Alpha had a house dance 
BUUdaj Dec ll at which there were 
nine couples. Mrs. I'ray .>! North Am- 
herst acted as chaperon. Music was 
furnished by a victrola and local talent. 

I). II. Smith '22 left college Tuesday 
to relurn to Cuba for the winler. lie 
will return to his former position in con- 
nection w i t li the sugar industry of the 
island. 

Christmas Party. 

I he ii i lis at Adams House are to hold 
a Christmas parly next Sunday evening 
Dec. lit. beginning at six o'clock. Miss 
Skinner and Miss Hamlin are to be 
guests of honor. The singing of Christ- 
mas carols and the customary hanging 
up of stockings about t he fireplace, are 
among Ihe plans for tbe evening. 

Informal Co-ed Dance. 

Tbe freshman and sophomore girls 
held a very informal victrola dame, 
last hriday evening from M to 11. at 
Adams House. Members of I he classes 
ol '2:! and '24 were guests. The big liv- 
ing room was brightened wit h an open 
lire, in which marshinallows wen- 
toasted between dances. The party 
closed with the singing of favorite 
Ag«ie songs about the fireplace. 
Floriculture Club. 
The annual eledion of officers of the 
Floriculture and Market Carden Clubs 
for the following year was held last 
Tuesday evening a combined meet- 
ing of the clubs which was held in 
French Hall. I'lc.eding the business 
meeting Mr. Thayer gave a talk on 
••(ireeiihoiises in Canada" and .losiah 
o'Hara gave an illustrated lecture on 
"GroOOBOUM Construction.'" Miss 

Bruce. Miss Towle. Mr. West and Ander- 
son were elected to serve as tbe social 
committee. The officers for the follow- 
ing year are to be .b siah O'Hara, pres- 
ident ; Harold Hunter, vice-president; 
and Miss low I. .secretary and treasurer. 
The meeting was attended by 2f>cliil» 
members and refieshments were served 
after thecompletion of all busin. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 



PAPER CITY ENGRAVING CO,, Inc. 



'20. — D. W. Belcher is teaching agri- 
culture, Chemistry . and manual train- 
ing at the high school in Walpole. \. H., 
besides leading the boys' and girls' club 
work of the vicinity. 



studio,MAs<>Niriii.n<k, Northampton, Makers of Hinli-gTadc Cuts for all 
n , kinds of Publications. 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular willi If, AC. Men 

Next Assembly, F RIDAY, Dec. 1 7, at 8 p. m. 

Private lessons | ( \ appointment. 

Tel. 761 Northampton 



IGLEYS 



Make the next! 
claar taste betterj 



after 

smoking 




KADCL1FFE BUILDING 

Phone 700 
Holyoke, Mass. 



PLAZA 

Nortia laptop . . Maes. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

\\ hill' III.' Ill-Xt 

PHOTO-PLAY 



s ii' ihewa. 

Program changed dally a*ccpl Monday 

and Tuesday. 

1 i;i.i> K r. ithi HUNT, Maaaear, 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



AMHERST LAUNDRY 

lias just inslalle.l a new machine, I be latest "Prosperity Boaom Bod) Pr*tt" f OT 

shirts. Thrs presses tbe entire front an.l aiotiml Ibe neck at one lime, saving 

wi ar ami t;ivinu the shirt a uniform smoot h finish . 

Citizens of Amherst cor.lially invited to visit Ihe l.aun.liy ami see ii in op.iaiion. 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IflC. Northampton, Mass. 



An optical than whi.-h maa iar ai up to the 
hinhfftt Ktaodard ol Bodarn tanrfce, \"u 

can rely on our skill and uonil latte in all 
Optical matters. 



our Art Department i» Blled with plrturea 

■oltable foi the ili-i ipo.tii f "tr;o" boaaea, 

<>r for birthday and wedding uifts. (IreeUng 
cards for pai i Iculai people. 



^=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 










SCHEDULE OF FINALS 

Continued from page 1 



The MMMchusetts Collegian, Wedne«d«y, December 15. 1920. 



QUALITY COUNTS 

The gift doesn't count, but how you give it tells the story. All the 
same there is no use in giving anything but the best. We carry 
it and our prices tell the story why it doesn't cost more. 

Just Around the Corner 



English 1, Patterson, 111 

Band, f. H. t 

I'll IKT, U 

Insect I'csts S-35, R. B. I» 

WEDNESDAY, DEC. M 

7-nn to 9-80 t. »«. 

l'lnsics Lab. 16, C. H. A 

Chemistry 1, ('. I,. V 
Chemistry 1. K. B. D 
Farm Machinery S-4, 1-VI. IS 

VI 1X11, BM 

Pomology 8-85, French, W. H. B 
Qonld, K. U K 

Drain t. II- t 
H)-tMI \. \i. I«. ll-QQ M. 
Kami Manag. W, H»2 

Horticulture :.o. F. II. D 

Spanish 7."., !•'. 11. II 
llotany s<>, C. II. B 

Poultry 7ts. US 
English 86,0. II. A. 

Hygiene and San. S-l, B. B. D, f. H. t 

Drainage and [rrig, B-SO, 18 

Holt. Maiiui. 8-16, F. I.. M 

1-(K) to :i-tHt i\ M. 
Entomology 68, E. B. K 
English ".:'.. Ill 
Auric Kiluc. 7">. 1 18 
French 85, 111 
French 88, F. II. II 
t lei man 2.">, V. H. G 
Microbiology 1. M 

t: 1 1 - 1 i - 1 i s-i. !•'. ii. i> 
(ias Engines 8-81, B-S7, 18 
U. II. L. 8-81. F. II. F 

:uo to 5-10 P. M. 

I'oiili iv 51, 118 
Landscape ho, W. 11. A 
Ponologn 77. \v. n. li 
Entomology 60, E. B. K 
Microbiology 81, M 
Microbiology 2.">, M 
Kur. Kngiii. 85, IS 
Tactics 1.1. 1 1 , III, F. B. I) 

IV, V. VI, C. H. A 
Arith. S-l. M. I'.. 11 

Floriculture 8-85, F. H. C 

Dairy inn 8-85, B-87, F. E*. M 

rini;>D\v, DF<'. 81 

T-.-.o to 9-60 a. M. 

Farm Manag. T5, MM 
Chemistry T6, C. L. V 
K. II. L. 59, V. L. B. 
Landscape 59, W. II. A 
agronomy 7">. 114 
VegeUblc (.aid. 7:., F. II. D 

Physic* 59 P. U 1$ 
Zoology .".it, F. B. K 
Botany 7.*., <'. H. B 
Drawing 25, W. H. B 

An. Hush. 85, 12 

Bygtenc 1. C. U. A 

Farm Law Si, F. 1- M 
Foti 1 try S-27. 118 

10-00 a. m. to 18-00 M 

Boon, and Boc. 15, 102 

Hist, and <;«>vt. 54, F. H. t 

Qerman 50, F. II. G 
A^ric. Boon. 60, C. H. A 

Auric Fdue. B0, HI 
Hot. B5, F. B.-D 
Wieulture 1. I. II. HI. IS 

IV, V. VI, F. L.-M 

li. II. I.. S-l, 111 

Plant Diseases 8*87, C. B. 1? 



1.00 („ MX) i'. m. 
Hort. Ifaanf. 76, W. U. B 
Botany 60, <'. H. B 

Mathematics 76, M. 15. B 

Veterinary 50, V. F. i>. 

BeonomloS and Sue. 51, C. II A 

Preach 50, F. II. II 

Auric. Boon. 7i>, 109 

TWOS and Breeds S-l, l-VI. IS 

Vll-Xll.F. I. . M- 



brought thu company to the troal tanks 
among augar companies. Bis program 
,,i welfare work for bla plantation is an 
excellent one. lie was one of the first 
managers to realize the Importance of a 
u I milk supply tor his employees and , 

has made an excellent start wilh an 
ideal dairy plant storked with imported 

Ayrshire*. Although the youngest 

siiuat mill manager la the Islands, he 

ranks with the best Inefficiency. 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



HO to 5-10 r. m. 
Floriculture 7-">. F. B. C 

Veg. Gard. 51, F. ll. l» 
Microbiology 60, M 

Spanish B0, P. B. f 

Boo. and Fcon. S-27, F. B. K 

Any examination not scheduled must 

he arranged bj appointment with the 

instructor in charge. 

When more than one room is Indi- 
cated, Instructors will please pod notice 

Of divisions to he assigned each room. 

l„ ease of conflict tor students having 
repeal courses, the lower olase subject 
muat take precedence. 



ALUMNI 

1:1. -Arthur Loadgren, who is teach- 
ing agriculture la the Orange high 

school, was recent l> married to Miss 
llerculsun. 

'17. Frank F. Webster is principal of 
Lbe high school at Westfield, Me. 

Bx-'aO. I'tiointon G. 'I'iiyloi Is study- 
ing forestry at Vale. 

10.— W. A. Goodwin is working la 

the Statistical Department of thetiov- 

er cut Census Bureau at Washington. 

D.C. 

•21).— F. II. Skinner is working lor the 
S. S. Fierce Co., ot Boston, la tbe mail 
order department. 

■jo. W.G.Baker is now working for 
th»- government Entomologj Depart- 
ment in Texas. 

•id.- s. F. Batchelder is with the 

BoWker Insecticide Company with ter- 
ritory in Michigan, 

"•20. -"Ted" Mitchell is state assistant 

in the Division <o Entomology in North 

Carolina. 

•20. — George Goodrich Is traveling 
for the Quaker <>ats Company. 

•gO.— LelandS Graff le teaching Eng- 
lisii sod Vegetable Gardening In the 
Norfolk County Agricultural School. 

Me also has charge ol the new dairy 
herd being formed there. 

10.— G. Blossom Woodward is now 
proprietor and manager of the Blossom 
Farm. Nassau. N V. He has just fin- 
ished retting out 599 young apple trees. 

'20.— C. A. Pike is working lor the 

Perkins Fruit and Products Company in 
Springfield. 
>g0.— Morton Casaidy Is'ruenlng a Bee 

Farm in Grot on, N. V. He plans to go 
U) Cubs lor the winter. 

•20. _ w. A. Lues is in Wenatcbee, I 
Wash., working on a t'ntit farm. 

••20. -B. F- .lakemau, after resigning 

his coaching position at M. i. C, ia 
now traveling fer the vVrigbt-Zlegler 
Dairy 8uppHes Company ol Boston. 
•07.— F. D. Larsen lias been managei 

,,f the Kilauea Sugar Company for 
about three years and in that time has 



A HAIR RAISING EXPERIENCE 

Amherst -a hair restorer, guaranteed j 

I., work is in ureal demand at Ihe Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College. If 

any ' hits such a patent, let him lake 

the first t»ln for Amherst, lor there his 
fortune is assured. 

A oollege tradition which requires all 

Preebmea lO SalUtS Seniors necessitates 
Ihe flowing Of moustaches hy the ineni- 
bersofth* latter class as a means of 

recognition, in spite of the agricul- 
tural ability of these men, a large ma- 
jority of the class members have been 
unable to raise any appreciable crop of 

hair on their uppet lips. Hence, the 

appeal for a guaranteed fertilizer. The 

nil I students of the class are exempt 

from participation In this "hatr-raiaing 
stunt.— -From the Boston Beeord of Oc- 
tober, 8, 1980. 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 

Main and Worthington Streets 

(Give u§ • trial « 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

<ATKKIN<; Ki'l; 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At I'ltATKIiSI'I'IKS K\ KISV NIGHT 

Get the Habit 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

The Leading Tailor and 
Gent*' Furnishing* 

— Full Dress Suits to Ben! — 

Clothes sponged and pressed by 

Holt man Machine 

Our Work U Onorunteed. 

Come and open an account with me. 
Phone 302-W 

11 Amity >sv., Am/>crxf, Mem 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Ap.pliances 

G. H, RUMERY, Electrician 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUGS AND CARPETS 
-K. I>. MAKSH K8TATK- 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

— AT — 

Economy Prices 



The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good thinns to eat. 

MRS. L.. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. ITel. 415-W) Hadley. MM 



KINGSLEY'S henrudams & co. 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy 

Amherst, 



Mass. 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place for 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






•«4a*ft«Mit*t W|MoU*P 

J/\l 132 

rricuttiir 

I ' 1 Orf*. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 12, 1921. 



No. 10 



FIRST BASKETBALL GAME 
A VICTORY, 28-23 

Connecticut Defeated by Superior 
Team Play. 

Tiie v;irmiy bashsthall ssasoa ttartsd 

,11 in llieriylit way Sal urc!:i> aflsraoOO 

whan t he Connsctteal Stats taam was 
defaatad in Hi** Drill Hall byatB48 
Beora. 

The uaine oommcneod jukI ath-i ilit- 
hockey trame at thMS i>'«luck. Ths 

ting capaciiy of Hi*' ball was all used 
and tas conafaal cheerlns, and Kiuuinn 

betwaSS the halves, aided materially in 

keeplasj up Ihe Bit hi >-i the \uu'"' teaaa. 

There was an seortag done hy either 

ilds until the middle of the flrat half. 

Uuser was the lirsl l<> semv. on a I. ml. 

Shortly afterwards tfarahaaaa, ptajtng 

l,is tilsl Aggie valsiiv name shot a loOB. 
Let Iroin Ihe center of the Blior. 

ihe playlet of Uarabssan tbrungboat 

ihe name was last. ( oimeci kiii '«* lirst 
I ; - .hi a loiil. Alexantler shoi 
nine fouls for t he visitors l> in t he foul 
Hbootlnf of I'.oser for M. A. ( . was ex 
eeptiooallj good, Me gaineil a point 
lor his team on ten iliilerein occasions, 
tbe last eight tries which he ma'lc l.e 

ing ■oeeeaaful. The half ended la 

iggle'l favor 12-11. 

K% the beginning of the aseond ball 

ihe home team ran up a lead ol live 
points hut two baskets from t he floor hy 
Connetleal made the score 11-80. 
tggta led all the way and at the leal 
whistle was ahead 2H--23. 

The superior pass work of the M.A.I . 

i mi was instrumental In their victory. 

Their defence was also exceptionally 

■ ■I and it was only on long shois 

Continued on pbb<' 7 



PREXY EMPHASIZES 

AGGIE'S NEEDS 



RECENT CHANGES IN 

FACULTY PERS0NNEI 



JUNIOR PROM 

COMMITTEE CHOSEN 

Seven Men from Junior Class to 
Choose Chairman this Week. 
Preparations for the Junior Prom were 

started last Thursday eight in class 

meeting when fourteen names came up 

..lure Ihe class, seven men to I.e. lected 

from this list to comprise Ihe coinmit- 

While the hallots wtre being counted 
. disenssioa upon the Index was carried 

and Bandall, Bilbert ami Basse!] 

• appointed a committee to bring 
papers at the neat meeting. 

l.ewamlowski made an appeal to ihe 

in to hack the class basketball leant. 

\s a result of the elections, the Prom 
•mmittoe is as follows: Clarence 1'' 
■\<. Sunderland: Henry Mosely, 

d astoabnty, Oona.; Alhen W. Smith, 
letbassptoe), Bobart W. Spring, Braln- 

• : Oeo. II. Thompson. Jr., Lenox; 
Bayatond Vlnten, Boston ; Prederlok 

Wangh, Amherst. The chairman 
i be elected by these seven ibis 
week. 



Mentions Need of Salary Increases 

and Building Program in 

Annual Report. 

In his annual report President Bnttei 

field slated that the college lares the 
most significant crisis in several dS 

cades. The problem is liol Ihe culllse 

that the College should take but the 

course that it is to be permitted to take. 

One of the most serious problems ll 

the ebangei Is the faevlty. "Nearlj 
hm> ebanges la i siatf of approximate!] 

2IM) have occuired in two years. Lets 
than one-third of Ihe Extension stall 

employed two years ago are no^witfa 

us" The reason for Ihisislhe ridicii- 
loiislv low salaries paid. Other slate 
Colleges have increased Ihe salaries of 

l beir professors Onrs also have been 
granted a slight Inereaes bat i> is In- 

I '..ntimu-il ..Ti BegS I 

ATHERTON CLARK '77 NOW 

A TRUSTEE OF M. A. C. 

Is Chosen to Succeed E. F. Mortimer. 

Sincere gratification is fell i>> many 
connected with the eotlege, nt tbe ap- 
pointment of Mi Aiheiton (lark as a 
Trustee of the oollege, to succeed Mr. 
ESdmnnd Mortimer, who has receatlj 

left the State. It seems very fitting that 

a son of one oi the earl] end most dis- 
tinguished Presidents should be so 
honored. 

Mr. (lark is a me in her of ihe class ol 
1S77. and for many years has Ween con- 
nected with Ihe li. II. Stearns Co., ol 
Hoston. He has lakeli an active inter- 

;n the welfare <>f the college, baviag 
been Presides! ot the associated 
A luinni. ami at present being the Chair- 
man of the Alumni Memorial Building 
i lommlttes 

There are now Bve grsduates of the 
college on tbe board ot trust ees. They 

are: Mr. William Wheeler, "71. Mr. 
Athertoii Clark. *77. Mr. Rimer D.lb.we, 
"hi, Mi. Charles H. Preston, '88. end 
Mr. Harold b. front, >•'>. 



Additions and Resignations Change 
Siaff of Institution, 

bines tbe opening of college last tall 

there have heen several addition! to Ihe 
faculty, in many rases to lake tbe 
place of t hose who have left for ot hei 

Belds. 
Profeesoi v M Snllsbnry was choeen 

to succeed I'r. .lessor McNult as head of 
the Depart incut of Animal llushandry. 

He graduated from Ohio state Univer- 
sity in 1918 ami since then has heen 

sagaged la work In animal husbandry, 
tiist as instructor at ihe oollege of agri- 
culture at North Carolina from tOlS- 
I'.u;,.;,- aaeiataal Professor at Ohio State 
ITnlversltj rrom I9HH918, ami as 

<■ it] agenl tor Medina county, Ohio, 

Horn I91N 1910, 

Mr. w. < . Thayer, a graduate of this 
college last yest is an Instructor in ihis 

depai tmeul also. 

Mr. w. i.. Duwd TO, a gradnaieoi M. 
A.c. .is now leaching la the Kolomol- 

Og] deparinienl and has ebargi of llie 
short course work. 

Mi. |{. I). Harris is a new instructoi 
in market gardening, lie is ngradnale 
oi Mlddlebnry college. 

Mrs. .1. <;. Btrabae, a graduate ot Co- 
lumbia is now leaching Home Boo- 
iioinics. 

Mr.Oiiv \ Ihelinisa new addition 
to ihe Agr ny Department. He is 

a graduate of South Dakata Mule 

t killege. 

Mr. \\ . K. Pb II brick a graduate of t his 
college in 1911 has heen appointed ex- 
tension esststssl Pmfeeeet ot Land- 
scape gardening, since his graduation 

he had been engaged in practical work 
in landscape gardening at Minneapolis. 
Minnesota. 

Professor Payne of ihe Poultry De- 
partment bes recently reelgned to take 
a position as professor of that subject in 
the depart meni of agriculture la Kansas 
state college. 

John .1. Vaginitis '10 is taking the 

place of Mr. Saw telle of t he Auricult u- 
I'untinued on psg* 8 



THREE CONCERTS GIVEN 

BY MUSICAL CLUBS 

Annual Christmas Trip a Financial 
and Social Success. 

Tbs annus! Christmas trip ol ihe ool 

lege musical clubs, which lasted this 

year from Dec. 18 to Jan. I. Included 
three concerts given In lbs riclnitj ol 
Boston. It may be considered a auc 

• ■essliil Hip from I lie linaccial Bland- 
point, and as toi enjoyment, the men 
all agreed thai the trip was well worth 

while. 

On Wednesday. Dec. 2!», Ihe tilsl cm 

ecu eras given at Btowe, a small town 
abont 80 miles outside of Boston; then, 

on Thursday ihe clubs went to Need- 
ham, just outside of Beaton, and on Sa,i 
unlay. New Veal's Day, name a li 
climax to the trip at the < upley I' 

lintel in ihS Hub City itself. This I.I I 
the men tree for Friday and New 

Tear's Bve,a lime which most ol ibem 
maaaged to pnl to good use. 

Meeting ai Hudson, on vTednesds) 
afternoon, transportation was fnrnUbed 

to ,-stowe b] the local i.ollv line. < n 
arriving at Ihelr dest Inst Ion, tbe men 

were furnished wilh a lieaiiy supper bj 

the ladies ol the town. Input tin in in 

( .nit iinieii mi pegs s 

GAME SECURED FOR MXAE 

FIVE FOR JANUARY 15 



Friday 



morning, 
evening, 

7:00 i- st. 



Seini-Centennial 

MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY 

February 4th and 5th, 1921 

PROGRAM 

Visit to (lasses and Inspection of College, 
Complimentary Alumni supper. 
John Keadrick Ban^s, followed by Musical Clubs 



Sat., 



10-30 



IO-3O A. 

2-00 P. 
3-OO P. 

7-3° P. 



\t. 

St. 



M. 
\t. 

M. 



COW 

Alumni meeting, room 



4, Sto< kbridge Hall. 
Meeting of Alumni interested in athletics, Room 114. 

Stockbridge Hall. 
Meeting of Alumni interested in non-athletics, Room 

1 10, Stockbridge Hall. 
Hockey game, Boston College vs. M. A. C. 
Basketball game, N. H. State vs. M. A. C. Drill Hall. 
Fraternity banquets. 



Varsity will Take on Wentworth In- 
stitute. 
The open <late on the baskstball 

sehednle Isal 11 1 day . .Ian . 1 •".. ci used b\ 

the cancellation <>t the Bhude island 
game, will be Wed '»> a gams with 

Wentwoilh Institute at the usual lime. 

:i-oo i". at. The manager had great diffi 
euiiy Infilling tblsdnteoa account ol 

I he lateness ol the season. Weill worth 
Institute has one of the fastest inslituti 
teams around Hoston, having lost onl] 
by .1 small score to Tufts. Com para 
lively little is known id their pn. 

in basketball aa their team has aevei 
dashed with aggie la previous yean. 
The Aggie qalutel ihowed up well 

last Saturday In their game, excelling 
in pass work and defence. Ol the two 

forwards, Koser ha.- saver played on 
the varsity before, but is going good 
and has hiseyeolithe basket. it. W. 
Smith, veteran letter man, lg begnnin- 
where he left off last year. Ma 1 -h ma u 
played wilh the usual good form that 
marked his w-uk last year in the inlet 

class series. He promises lo M e ot 

the fastest centers in New England in- 
lereollegiale basketball this season. 
(iowily. all New Knglaml guard, 
lost none of his skill on tbe defence. 
Thompson, the other back, is malting 
good in his position. 

The probable Aggie lineup is; 

Koser, rf ; A. W. Smith, If : Mar-h- 
man, c; Gowdy, lg; Thompson, rg. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 12, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 12, 1921. 



M. A. C. SEPTET MEETS 

DARTMOUTH SATURDAY 



MunselPs Return Should Strengthen 
Team for Game at Hanover, N. H. 

Tlic M. A. C Iio.key team will play 
its Mini out or town game OH Saturday, 
Jan. 16, when it BOOta Dartmouth at 
Hanover, N. II. Dartmouth this year 
has one of the Strongest teams in New 
England, and probably a stronger team 
than last year when she gained a 1 to 
verdict over Aggtt after three overtime 
periods. At that time the Maroon and 
While was crippled, with two men on 
the sick list, hut this time she is out 
lor reogeaOOC and the Green team will 
have iis work cut out on Saturday af- 
ternoon. 

Dartmouth, like Aggie, has practi- 
cally a veteran team. She is coached 
by I.e. m Tuck. .1 former Dartmouth and 
II A. A. player, and last Saturday de- 
lected Ainlieist College 4 to 2. The 
A inliersi-M. A. 0. game today will give 
some basil oi comparison hefween the 
! wo teams. 

The Aggie seven has not yet been put 
to a leal test but at present it looks like 
one oil lie hesl evci turned out here. The 

blgb score egaloel the Springfield 

Hockey (lull is perhaps some indica- 
tion of its scoring power. Since the re- 
cent cold weather thesipiad has been 
out on the ice and has got in some haul 
practice in preparation for the tirnt 
games. 

Harold Poole is now out with the 
Squad and should give added strength 
to the delelisive play. 

Ooaob Maosell has recovered from a 

recent severe cold and will be in the 
game Sgala Saturday, at point. 

The team will probably lineup as 
follows : 

M. A. ( . OAKTMOUTH 

McCarthj (eapt.), rw 

lw, Kothschild (capt.) 

Gordon ot Lnderson, H* rw, Smith 

LyonSi 8 c, Sands 

Snow, r r, Perry 

Ifausell, P P, Furry 

Collins, ep cp, Itoss 

\.-well,g t!, Neidlinger 



CARTOONIST ENTERTAINS 

APPRECIATIVE AUDIENCE 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

SERIES UNDER WAY 



Pitt F. Parker Opens Social Union 
Program for 1921. 

The first Social Union entertainment 
of 11*21 was held in the Bowker Audi- 
t OTt a a, Stock bridg e Hall, last Saturday 
evening, Jan. 8, at (S-'.W, and was en- 
joyed by an audience el over 400 stu- 
dents and townsfolk. The entertain- 
ment was given by Mr. Pitt F. Parker, 
and consisted of drawings and racial 
tlptttre work. Mr. Parker j»roTed 
himselt to be very witty and entertain- 
ing, and while sketching he kept up an 
entertaining run of conversation on a 
variety of subjects, A sly stab concern- 
ing the use ot cosmetics was made with 
the aid of I drawing and the recitation 
of a short poem. He sketched an in- 
verted scene of Niagara Falls, which 
proved to be Incomprehensible to his 
audience until be had set it upright. 
A not her beautiful scene which he drew 
was that of a mountain near Taeoma, 

Washington, He spoke on cartooning, 

Saying that it was the oldest thing in 

the world. The performance was Inter- 

esting as it was unique. The next "so- 
cial Union entertainment will be held 
Baturdaj evening, Jan. 22, and the at- 
traction will be Mr. 1$. K. Ford, electri- 
cal scientist. 



Sophs Defeat Seniors and Juniors 

Lose to Freshmen in Opening 

Games. The Schedule. 

lnterclass basketball started off with 
a vim Friday night at the Drill Hall 
when the Sophomores overcame the 
Seniors by the score of 20-11, and the 
Freshmen defeated the Juniors 15-11. 
Both games were fast and full of action, 
a fact which would seem to indicate 
that it will not be an easy matter 
to decide the championship of the 
series this season. The fact that both 
lower classes came through with vic- 
tories augures well for a keen competi- 
tion for the annual Freshman-Sopho- 
more numeral contest. 

In the Hrst game the fast teamwork of 
Tuiney with Sargent and Grayson kept 
the Seniors hustling during the first 
half, which ended with the score 9-3. 
In the other half the Sophomore for- 
wards were better covered, though they 
managed to score as many points from 
fewer tries. The defensive work of 
both Latour and Hunter was good. 
For the Seniors, Armstrong and Davis 
showed shooting ability, while Hrigham 
starred on the defensive. 

The line-up: 
1921 
Poole, King, lb 
King, Waite, rb 
Brtgham, <• 
Lent, Davis, If 
Cascio, Armstrong, rf 

lb, Hunter, Wirth 

Heferee — Ball. Time — 20--rninute 
periods. Score— 1923-20, 1921-11. 

The second game was close, hut was 
marred by many personal fouls called 
on both sides. Barrows '24, helped his 
team materially by bis good shooting 
of fouls. There seemed to be not a little 
ditliculty over the inside side lines, 
which make the court much narrower 
than last year. The defensive playing 
of both teams was good, but in the sec- 
ond half the Freshmen got started and 
showed a tine spurt of team work. The 
shooting of Kane, '24, was of the best, 
as was also the defensive work of 
Weatherwax and Hairston. For the 
Juniors, Clark and Webber did good 
work. 

The line-up: 

JlNlOKS 

Clark, lb 
Lewandowski, rb 
Randall, c 
Wentsch, If 
Krasker, Webber, rf 



1923 
rf, Sargent 
If, Grayson 
e, Tnesey 

rb, Latour 



FltKSHMKN 

rf, Barrows 
If, Kane 
c. Hill 
rb, Weatherwax 
lb, Hairston 
Referee — Gore. Time — 20 -minute 
periods. Score- 1924-15, 1922-11. 



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in every line. Overcoats in very snappy models from $40 to $75. 

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There are more than 2,500,000 
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DAIRYING with a Dc Laval 
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prosperity to many thousands of 
users. No branch of farming is so 
surely profitable as good dairying, 
%s ith its steady cash income every 
month in the year and no waiting 
for crops to mature. 

The De Laval saves cream twice 
a day, 365 days a year, it skims 
cleaner; produces smoother, better 
cream; lasts longer, and is easier to 
clean. It pays for itself the first 
year and may be bought on such 
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while being paid for. There is a 
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There Is a Dc Laval Agent near yea 
Alk bin lor a De Laval demonstration 

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Chicago, 29 E. Madison St. 

San Francisco, 61 Beale St. 



Soon er or later you will use a 

De Laval 

Cream Separator or Milker 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 
SCHEDULE FOR 1921 
Jan. 7. Freshmen vs. Juniors. 

Sophomores vs. Seniors. 
Jan. 14. Sophomores vs. Juniors. 

2-yr. vs. Seniors. 
Jan. 21. Freshmen vs. 2-yr. 

Juniors vs. Seniors. 
Jan. 2*. Freshmen vs. Sophomores. 

2-yr. vs. Juniors. 
Feb. 11. Freshmen vs. Seniors. 

Sophomores vs. 2-yr. 
Feb. 18. Annual game. 

Freshmen vs. Sophomores. 
Feb. 25. To deeide series if there is a 

tie. 
All games to start at 7 1*. m. 

BASKETBALL NOTICE 

Due to an error in the last Coeekgian 
we print the following: A game will be 
played with Worcester Tech on Feb. 22, 
at Amhernt, at 3-00 p. m. 



When You Ar© Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



-FOR- 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



L 



On those cold frosty days drop in for a cup of piping hot coffee and crullers, between classes. 

AGGIE INN 

Restaurant Notebooks Tobacco Candy Banners 



7-00 p. 

T-(H> v. 
840 V. 

tJ-45 P. 

7-40 A. 
MW v. 



», -10 A 



7-40 A 

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CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wkdnksday, Jan. 12. 

M. — Junior Smoker, at Social 
I'liion. 

m.— Basketball, Drill Hall, Fresh- 
man vs. Amherst high 
school. 

m. — Animal Husbandry Club 
meeting,Stockbri(lgeIIall. 
TutusDAY, Jan. 18. 

m.— Lecture on Japan.V.M.C.A. 
French Hall, Koom F. 

Fiuoay, Jan. 14. 
m.— Chapel. 
Satukdav, Jan. 16. 
m.- Basketball, Drill Hall, M. 
A. C. vs.Wentworth Inst. 
Hockey, Hanover, N. H., 

A. 0. vs. Dartmouth. 
Basketball, Northampton, 
Two Year vs. Clarke 
School. 
Sixuay, Jan. 16. 
, m.— Sunday Chapel, I'eter \V. 
Collins, Knights of Co- 
lumbus, Boston. 

Monday, Jan. 17. 
m. — Chapel. 

m. — Roister Doister guest night. 
Social Union. 

Tuesday, Jan. 18. 
m. — I'omology Club meeting, 
French Hall. 
Basketball, Drill Hall, Two 
Year vs. Amherst high 
school. 

Wkknkskay, Jan. 10. 

, m.— Chapel, M. V. Malcolm, 
York City. 



SECOND RUSHING 

SEASON PLEDGES 



The Following Men Were Pledged to 

Fraternities at Monday Morning 

Chapel, January 10. 

The following men were pledged to 
fraternities after chapel on Monday 
morning, January 10: 

Al.l'HA (iAMMA Kito— Carl <>. Nelson, 

Gloucester; Wemlall F. Mian, M*l- 
nisc; Allen ('. I. eland, K. llriclnewater. 

Kappa Skim a— Hobert K.Stectv, (he 
pachet.K. I.; Alfred P. Stael.nei \ Wind- 
ham, Conn.; Richard A. Whitney, New 
York City. 

Thbta Cm— Howard II. Davis, Brock- 
ton. 

Phi Siuma Kappa— Frederick Braa- 
ner, Bay Shore, L. 1.; Thomas I,. Var- 
num, Lowell. 

Lambda Cm Alpha— Perry Bartlett, 
Holyoke. 

Kappa Gamma I'm- Dana Turner. 
Chester. 

Alpha Siuma Phi pledged Francis 
• 'lark of Holyoke, a graduate of <ath<«- 
lic I'niversity, Washington, D. ('.. and 
a inemher of our faculty. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 



SKK <>UK LINK OK 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

BS.TABI.I.aaD 1BH1 

Stephen Lank Folgek. (Iae.i 

MAN OrACTTtTHINU J UW BI.KHM 

ISO I1KOADWAY. NEW TOaU 

OLUII AND COr.,I..K<iK 

I'INN AND KINUH •* 

SOLD, MII.TB9M AND BMONZB M BH>» I » 

Suits Pressed, 65c 

on Sanitary Pressing Machine. 

LABR0VITZ, 11 Amity Street 



Wool Sport Hose 

Just the hose for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A food 
assortment of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

THE 
DRAPER HOTEL. 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



DEAN BEEBE SPEAKS 

Tuesday afternoon, Dec. 21, although 
coming in the midst of finals, was re- 
MTTed la order that the Pilgrim Tercen- 
tennial might be celebrated, with James 
\ Ueebe, Dean of the School of Theo- 
logy, Boston University, as the speaker. 
Dean Beebe said it did not seem right 
tooail the Pilgrims "forefathers," for 
they were young men of an average age 
of only 33. It is superfluous to look at 
the surface of their lives, yet their 
inner life discloses something worth 
while. We are dealing with religious 
material when we deal with the Pil- 
.'i to. They subordinated the mater- 
ial to the spiritual, and by doing so 
•succeeded in producing one of the 
smoothest running governments ever 
known. The pilgrim group was not a 
oolooy, but a church composed of ideal- 
To-day the idealist is called a 
liolshevist or a Socialist. It is a fact 
that democracy is afraid of idealism. 

This brings up the question of bow 
much we really believe in democracy. 

r and race have quite a bit to do 
with our beliefs, and the unlimited ap- 
fttiofl of democracy is not thought 
»t at all. In other words, there seems 
'<> be a double standard of living. The 
-rims had the the courage to bring 
their beliefs to a single standard with 
■he subordination of everything to re- 

'ii. 
In closing, Dean Beebe showed the 
<lan»er that confronts young men to- 
day when they stand on the threshhold 
" f iportunity. and recommended that 

i ica strive to create an atmosphere 

enial to ideals as the Pilgrims did 
three hundred years age. 



ASSISTANT FOOTBALL 

MANAGERS CHOSEN 

The assistant managers of football for 
the coming year were chosen last Fri- 
day afternoon at a meeting of the cap- 
tain, student manager, and general 
manager. Tbey were rated on a basis 
of their merits and comparative stand- 
ing, in which a written examination, 
the amount of work, ami general abil- 
ity counted prominently. Those who 
were considered as being best <|uali- 
fied for the position are: John M. Whit- 
tier '23 and llolden Whit alter '23. 
Whittier is a graduate of Everett High 
School and Wbitaker is a graduate of 
Newton High School. 



OVER ONE HUNDRED IN 

TEN WEEKS' COURSE 

After areuistration lasting t he ureal at 
part of last week, more than 110 stu- 
dents have been added to M. A. 0, 
These men and women have enrolled in 

the Ten Weeks Winter S<1 1, under 

the auspices of the Short Course. 11*21 
marks the 22d year of a winter school at 
Aggie. The men and women taking. 
the courses this year come from all parts 
of the state, and represent almost every 
state of education, some being common 
school graduates, while a few are round- 
ing out college educations with a little 
practical work. The usual subjects in 
agriculture and homemaking are being 
taught this year. In addition, there is 
a "Two Weeks' Tractor Course." which 
will offer opportunities for regular stu- 
dents also to study these "machine 
horses." 

The limiting factor of the winter 
school is the lack Oi rooms, on or near 
the campus, for the students. This 
factor has been the only thing that has 
kept the enrollment below 120 for the 
last two years. 

In addition to these people, who are 
taking advantage of "ten week- a' col- 
lege," several new men have enrolled 
in the Two Year and Federal Board 
groups. 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 
LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Old Doerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield Mass. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



Ir*.aj£e'«* Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 

MORANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 
Institution Cooking Apparatus 



Manufacturers 
of 



86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON 



£&rptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Man 




The M—chuaettB Collegian, Wednesday, January 12, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 12, 1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Pabltsbed every Wednesday by the 
Students <>f ltit> MasKa. liiisetU Ag- 

rlettlturft] College. 

BOARD oK BDITOR8. 

LAI MHI r. Mahtin "St. U*m -in-rhlef 

Komkki I.. Junkh W Mt S— tlS I Kditor 

ABBOCIATK Kiutokh. 

Saoaaa w. eoman '21 

Kknnkth A. Haiinauo 'Tl 

h kiun w. Bmmiui "-"-' 

IWi 1. I.. I'.i KNim ".'■J 

II..11AKI W. Si-uis.i m 

HK.I 1'INd K. .IA< KHON '22 

JOMI M Whitiikh "-'H 
L. |{. AltltlNO'i'oN Ii 



BUSINKSH DlSI'AUTMKNT. 
BSMNHH I- «■*■ "•!. KimlnfM Manager 

KM K.11 ( . l-KKnios '-'I Advertising Manager 
CBABLBII A. Mi < k "M 



not merely a memorized aeeumiilittion 
of fads, ttul ih the preparation and 

training lot a fuller life expression. 

This idea was recently «iven by a mem- 
ber of an edncalioii class at M. A. C. 
Among ttie factors of a fuller life ex- 
pression were mentioned personality, 
reasoning power, culture, and others. 
These statements were iccepted hy the 
majority of the class as belag merest 
to the true dctinitiou. 

With this in mind, how many stu- 
dents realize what they are in college 
|©r? The majority would answer" To 
gO< an education." How many realize 
the opportunities for selt-development 
which are offered at ibis college? 
[low many are really Baking use of 
tl.enr.' There are to he heard about 
the campus such terms as "hay shak 



Mi dilation Manager 

MVKi.N <i. Ml 'UK ay '22 



EIOU»a> WlllTTAKKU '23 

Own B. KoI.hom '28 



Subscription $2.tM) per year. Single 
copies, 1<> cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered a» second-plans matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Aoepte.l for mailing at special 
rate of pOBta«« provided for in section 1103. Act 
Of ll.-tol.er. WI1 :oitli..ii/e.l August 20. 1918. 



We Turn to the East. 

In his annual report to the Trustees 
of M. \.C. President Uuttertield has 
laid hare t lie needs of the College, 
neediwhlefa must be Idled very soon if 
AggUtl u«»l '" 'all to the rank of a 
seeoad-grsda institution. 

Proxy stated that the College faces 
at this time a crisis, perhaps the most 
siynilicant one in several decades. We 
are crippled in four ways by lack of 
appropriations. First, we are losing 
professors tar taster than we can hire 
competent men to till their places- this 
because salaiies here arc so ridiculously 
low. Second, the scope of the College 

baa heen broadened la the past few 

years more extensively than BoBtOB has 

B iii t.. broaden our appropriations. 

Third, the building program has been 

■o shortened that "no major bnlidlag 

has heen provided f»f seven years, and 
new departments have no abiding 
place." Fourth, we are handicapped 
in publicity work l>y lack of funds. 

Kver.v Aggf« m.i 11 wlln ■*• been on 
the campus even for one year must 
lia\e heen oogoizanl of these condi- 
tions. He nana) realize how numerous 
Aggle'l "bllli of difficulty" have be- 
come. Most of us probably have little 
Influence over the political affairs of 
the bay State, but any pressure that 
can he exerted through inlluential 
parent! or friends— pressure to induce 
the legislature through its individual 
member* to do the obviously fair thing 
to M. A. C. in way of appropriations — 
tUCB pressure should be made use of. 

The real of us must gaze to the East, 
to the gilded dome on beacon Hill, and, 
like Mohammedans praying to far-off 
Mecca, pray that those assembled there 
will not forget us iu 1921. 



"Hayahakers" 

F.ducation and its various advantages 
has heen the theme of discussion in the 
learned gatherings of the world. By 
these discussions policies have heen de- 
elded upon and their development finds 
reaction la the system now in vogue at 
M. A. C. 

The later idea is that education is 



ei", "wheat", used in reference to 
some particularly indifferent fellow- 
stndenl. In brief, these terms merely 
indicate that these men are not taking 
advantage of their opportunities bli- 
the fullest development. They are re- 
tiring into a shell, avoiding contact 
with their fellows except ahmu ccitain 
narrow lines. Their view-point of life 
is one-sided. When t hey leave college 

they will be unahle to t ipete with 

olheis excepi along certain narrow 
lines, When jolted out of I he rut hy a 
stroke of Fate they will he lost. 

It is to these men that this is ad- 
dressed. The man who has chosen lo 
pursue agriculture should not disre- 
gard art, music, literature, the social 
graces, economics, sociology, and the 
other more or less cullural siihjccis. 
be aide lo meet your fellow-men on any 
Bt ending. Be cosmopolitan, it will do 
no harm. Afgfe presents these oppor- 
tunities, make use 04 I hem. 



bared Ibal when we go back on Cod 
we cause him great pain; bul when 
human belngl come into His truth God 
rejoices. lu the Prodigal Son. the 

rather represents the sufferer and not 

Ihe son, and in tbfl same respect Cod is 
the one who sutlers when we do VTOng. 
In referring to his war experience in 
France, bishop BugbSf spoke of the 
numerous addresses he gave lo the 
soldiersou profanity, and that in every 
ease Hie men realized the wrong they 
had heen committing h.V talking in pro- 
fane and mean conversation. The man 
who swears violates the laws of Qod 
Almighty, and above all be is not a 
good Cbrlatias. If, Instead of nsiug 

profane terms in a careless and mean- 
ingless sense, we make them really 
mean something, then we will have 

benefitted ourselves la no small respect. 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

( ATKKINO KOK 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At KKATKKM I1KHKVKUV NIOIIT 




MA BELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men taiiL'lit to lead by quickest methods. 

Inoulrlmm ml Mill* Studio, 

y. o nutldtas. PncneeM-H 

Conn. General 
Life Ins. Co. 

UABTFOMD, CONNECTICUT 

placed over $ 1 00,000 INSUR 
ANCE on M. A. C Students in 
1919-1920. 



OVER THREE-FOURTHS M. A, C, 
STAFF 

have insured with this company. 



BISHOP HUGHES DELIVERS 

IMPRESSIVE SERMON 



"Man's Friendship for God", is His 
Theme. 

liishop Hughes was the speaker at 
Sunday Chapel, Jan. t». and used for 
his topic the story of Hie Prodigal Son. 
Ue impressed the fact that ahove all 
Qod cares for everything that lakes 
place on earth, and if we do any kind 
of wrong it hurts Him. Qod shares 
both pain and pleasure, proof of which 
is found when running through the New 
Testament where we Bad Rgaln sndsgala 
phrases of divine pain and pleasure. 
Asone passes up the scale of the animal 
kingdom it is seen that the power of 
pair and of sorrow increases proportion- 
ally with the advancement of each 
animal. 

We must always keep in mind the 
friendship of Qod for us, and realize 
that it makes a vast difference to Qod 
the degree of our friendship for Him. 
Although brought up under good re- 
ligious training at home, it often hap- 
pens that when a young man goes to 
college, he goes back on Qod and (lod's 
friendship by not following his early 
teaching. It must always be remem- 



Speaking of evening clothes, ours 
speak for themselves. 

The finest fabrics. 

The highest type of tailoring. 

Style — advanced or conservative; 
as you prefer. 

The fit yott see before your order. 

Price about half a fine tailor's. 

I'lie lies! of evcrytliinu' college men wear. 

Rogkrs Pkrt Company 



You can carry $5000 converti- 
ble Life Insurance for 10 years 
at a quarterly cost of $11.00 
{oge *o) 



Broadway 

at 13th St. 



' Four 
Convenient 

Corners" 



Broadway 
at 34th St. 



Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren at 41st St 

N1.W YORK CITY 



Full information on planning 
your insurance for the present 
and future gladly furnished. 



H. E. ROBBINS 

Amherst, Mm**. Tel. 442-N 



NOTICE! 

Are you thinking of taking out the following Magazines lor this year: 

The Ladies' Home Journal - The Saturday Evening Post - The Country Gentleman 

If >o. I would like to get your order— I am a student at Aggie. Write 
me a card and 1 will be pleased to call and see you. 

LKON L. CI. ARK, iJl Northampton Road, Amherst 



TO ALL ALUMNI 

The 1922 fade* will be out during 
the 8rst weak* of next term. If you 
are interested in the Memorial 
Building, football at M. A. C. and 
other items of equal interest write 
to our sales manager, Hervey Law, 
Lambda Chi Alpha House, and give 
him your order. Price $3.25. 




MARK 



A PIPE'S the thing with men. Under the spell of 
W D C Pipes men relax, fagged brains are relieved. 
The specially seasoned genuine French briar breaks in sweet 
and mellow] It will not crack or burn through. The 
WDC Triangle on the bowl is your guarantee. Ask any 
good dealer. 

WM. DEMUTH 8t CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLDS LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 




A#H)fi) ^ r $™fitfi *fct HUui fcrrnra $rst" 



WH realise that it baa become not ■ ■•••fioa of wbettter mercbaDcjiM *v\\* ni n profit 
or ni n loss (be profit of the iiuliviiiiuil ia <»f nuihII moment wlirre I ho welfare of 



I ho multitude i< 



»lv«.,|. Th 



involved. 1 be eleariaa ol ebelvea baa become a public duty n 
patriotic duty so that future pu r< luisi nii imiy he done, to the end that the industries 
of America may not become ■taaaant. Your aarebaaec and our parcbaeee help to beep 
America employee 1 * 



up ami both -iilr- handicapped '>> pool 

IOC and lack of hoard* around Ihe link. 
The .V. A. C. men proved lo b* much 



bsvc a \ei > bncj afternoon, 
Captain M«< erthy, Snow, and Col Una 

tllii the liest work for If. A. <\ ami Art 



M. A. C. SEVEN DEFEATS 

SPRINGFIELD HOCKEY CLUB 

raster than inelr opponents. Thej Jobnson '16, an old Aggie baseball and 

On Saturday afternoon the Varsity kept ihe pack la Springfield terrltorj bocksy man. wa> tbe -tar of tba Springs 

iioekey team played a practice gs practleallj the vbole time and KCOrcd 

..n tbe pond sgalaet ■ leaai represent' almost at will. Tbe Springfield shooters 

ing the Springfield Hockey Club, aggie seldom broke Ibmngfc the agale de 

woe easily thoii«hlhe game wa» slowed feme and goallender Newell did not 



Held Kgaregation, 
Coacb "Sunny" Mansell eatcbed Ibe 

game from the sidelines as h. is jnsi 

n covering from ■ severe cold. 




What Is Vacuum? 



IF THE traffic policeman did not hold up) his hand and control the 
autcmobilcs and wagons and people there would be collisions, 
cor.fusion, and but little progress in guy direction. His bus!, 
is to direct. 

The physicist who tries to obtain a vacuum that is nearly perfect 
has a problem somewhat like that of the traffic policeman. Air is 
compo cd of molecules — billions and billions of them flying about 

in all directions a:.d often colliding. The physicist's pump ii designed 
to make the molecules travel in oi.e direction — out through the 
exhaust. The molecules are much too ■ » be set . 1 with a 

microscope, but the pump jogs them along and at least smarts them in 
the right direction. 

A perfect vacuum would be one in which there is not a single free 
molecule. 

For over forty years scientists have been trying to pump and jog 
and herd more molecules out of vessels. There are still i;i the best 
vacuum obtainable more molecules per cubic centimeter than there 
are people in the world, in other words, about two billion. Whenever 
a new jogging device is invented, it becomes possible to eject a few 
million more molecules. 

The Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company have 
spent years in trying to drive more and more molecules of air from 
containers. The chief purpose has been to study the effects obtained, 
as, for example, the boiling away of metals in a vacuum. 

This investigation of high vacua had unexpected results. It 
became possible to make better X - ray tubes — better because the 
X - rays could be controlled; to make the electron tubes now so essen- 
tial in long-range wireless communication more efficient and trust- 
wor hy, and to develop an entirely new type of incandescent !nmp, 
one which is filled with a gas and which gives more light than any of 
the older lamps. 

No one can foretell what will be the outcome of research in pure 
science. New knowledge, new ideas inevitably are gained. And 
sooner or later this new knowledge, these new ideas find a practical 
application. For this reason the primary purpose of the Research 
Laboratories of the General Electric Company is the broadening of 
human knowledge. 



Gemiairal Hectric 

General Office V*©1 



10® 



Schenectady, N. Y. 



95- JT - I) 



'-'ii. A. L loeiii.i. is staking good 
under the unique ■] item ui 1 be Dalton 

high set I. lie is a leaeber ul uleece 

and also at h lei lo coach . 

S. S. HYDE 

OfBtlotenta •»•»«! jewt-n-r 

I PISManl Slicft ii|> MM lliulil . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 



lull} turn n toed 



NOVICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatlj and promplj done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Sane money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4. Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



10 Pleasant 5t. 



Id. J 



I <•! inerlj < < . t ii ii 1 1> i.i < ;((•• 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 
WHILE vor WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - MaBg> 

Students: Attention! 

FREE I Beautiful Gmlmndmrm tor 1B21 

bpecislly ordered for Fraternity 

Booses. Call early before 

too late. 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 



£ 

SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



The Ma»achii8ett» Collegian, Wednesday, January 12, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 12, 1921. 



JUNIOR CLASS MEETING 

AND SMOKER HELD 

'I'lit- lirsl Junior eI«M smoke* ol Hie 
year «r*J bald last sjsafc I-Vi.lay in 

French Hall with president Albert W. 
Smith the presiding officer. 

( ^orge \. Cot too, ceptaln-eleel "i 
root ball, wait be Bret of a llel of Informal 
speakers. Herberl U Collies, rtai 
athlete of ili.' elans, was the Bext man 
to be anlled <>" Hl« *•» words on 
ho. -key and beeebaJl were well eboeen 
and drew forth R tx«Knl beodclap. 
Clarence P. Clark, maoager of baseball, 
gave a few reeaarks and also read are- 
port from the Sopli-Sciiior tio|> pom- 

m It tee glviou the balance oo band. 

The principal speaker of the evening 
was Prof. Hfeka «»t tee athletic depart- 
ment, Be responded to the chairman's 
,-ail w'nii iiis usual Interesting words 
and particularly emphasised (be need 
[or more spirit among the npnerolasa- 
men in regards to going mil for mane 
gerahlps. 

It was voted to appoint a class noini- 

natlng committee. 

It W8J al.so voted to eleel t lie Junior 

Prom committee at tb« neat meeting. 
Paul Reed was elected to serve on the 

smoker committee to replace I). II. 
Smith Who lias gone to Cab*. Kenneth 

\ Barnard was elected t<> serve as the 
other Junior member of tbs athletic 
hoard. Lewaodowskl bad previously 
I. ecu elected as the litst member. 

The next smoker will be held tonight 
in the Social Union. 



BOGHOLT 21 HEADS 

ROISTER DOISTERS 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 



Repairing 



Shine 



Succeeds J. H. Smith '21. Plans Be- 
gun for Prom Show. 

At a meeting of the Bolster Doister 
dramatic society just previous to the 
Christmas recess, Carl If . Bogbolt '21, 

Of Newport, B. I., was chosen president 
to succeed J. II. Smiih »», whose resig- 
nation was aeeepted i>y 'he society. 
Bogbolt became a member of the Bols- 
ter Bolsters l.y taking part in last year's 
Prom show, "Nothing but the Truth", 
and has since taken a very active inter- 
est in the organisation. Be scored a 
decided bit i" il"' IWO commencement 
play, "The Witching Hour". His elec- 
tion is a popular one to the society and 
undergraduates. He Is a member of 
the <>. T. V. fraternity. 

\\ the same meeting a committee 

consisting of Faculty Manager Kami, 
Manager Bdman, C. M. Bogholl '21, end 

1). (i. Davidson "21 was chosen to select 
a play tor Junior I'roin. Announce- 
ment ol the play selected, with east of 

characters chosen, will probably appear 

ill the next Cot l.l «.l AN. 



T. MIENTKAS 



— TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for airst-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing! 

It Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real Bargains in 

HI6H GRADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SALE! 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing; done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on your way ui> town. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRV AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



SENATE NOTES 



VARSITY RELAY 

PRACTICE BEGINS 



The President of the Senate took oc- 

oeaion recently to remind the Kreshmen 
that alter the rhrisltnas vacation they 

were not required hj the rules of the 
Senate to salate Beaton and Senate 

meml.ers. The ban 00 walking with 

oo-ede is also off. 

The Senate is BOW working OS rules 
tor the annual Freshman-Sophomore 

banquet season, coming next term. 
Special provisions ere to be made to 
guard egaiast any possible breaking ol 

the rules l.y eit her side. 

The Senate now holds its meetings 

everj Tuesday oighl at 6-45, rather 
man at W6 aa wan stated in thecampus 

calendar. 

Professor W. R. Bart ol the Depart- 
meat of Agricultural Education has ae- 
eepted an invitation to act as one ol the 

fudges at the Bowdoln-Dartmouth de- 
bate to be held Rl Brunswick, Maine. 

January 14th. 



OWN HALL 



; BUPKB-PRODI CTIOS DA.YI 

1 niirsday .| ; ,,u London's hsen red- 
blooded novel of adventure, 
••The Sea Wolf," Even atil 
ring eptaode of •*>*« : ""' 
straggle vi\ idly pteturlaed on 

tin- MS. _,, 

Scene* from Amherst-Wil- 
liam* football name and noted 
graduate* In parade. «rltb 
President Old* and Governor 
Coolidge leading. . 

News Hurt and Jeff Topics 



Mat. at 3 
Eve. 1 attorn 

6-45,8-30 j 

Mat. 17c. 22c 
Km-. 28c. 33c 



Friday 

Nat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Olive Thomas in"Youthfnl 
Folly." \ STtppina story of 
scrambled domestic rela 
tlons, laid in the Old South 
and New York < Ity. 
Scenic reel 
■j reel MacK Sennett Comedy 

Z . Bryant Washburn and 

Saturday Loi* Wihon in "Why Smith 
; Left Home/'from the laoah- 
able mure fares bi Qeorsje 
Broadhnrst. . . 

,hI sp. "The King of the 
Circus." 
News Comedy 



Hat. at 3 

Eve.— 2 Show 

6-45.8-30 



Good Bunch of Veteran Runners Give 
Promise of Successful Season. 

The Varsity Belay practice started 
last week with a good hunch of veteran 
runners out, who arc hitting the hoards 
with the old time speed. The seniors 
ate the best represented with six men 

out including Captain Gray, Hard, 

Allen. Sloane, Slate ami West. Sulli- 
van and Kemp tire juniors represented, 
while I lie sophs have MaoCready, Wood- 
work and Tanner out. The Freshmen 
have only three men out , Wood wort h, 
Mac Me, ■ and Ball. More candidates 
are needed both from the Freshman and 
Sophomore classses. 

Practice is being held every afternoon 
under coach Dickinson and Manager 
Gilbert. The practice consists largely 
in training lakina the hanks properly 
gad passing the baton. This is espec- 
ially important as M. A. C. has always 
I. ecu one of the most proficient teams in 

passing the baton at the meets. 

Captain Giaj .Sullivan, Mact'rcady and 
Wood wort fa are doing good work as 
usual and Allen is in in good form. 

The litst race will be with New Hamp- 
shire, I'd', "i.at the new arena in Huston. 
A race with Amherst is also contemp- 
lated on the week before. A success- 
ful season is looked forward to. 

LAST COPIES OF 1921 

INDEX SOON TO APPEAR 

Those w ho have not yet received their 
copies of the 1021 Index will tret them 
soon. Several unfortunate circum- 
stances have occurred to delay publica- 
tion since last June, the time when the 
hooks were scheduled to appear. The 
principal cause of delay was a misun- 
derstanding between the Business De- 
pan ment and the publishers concern- 
ing the number of books desired. The 
latter have ackn o wle dg e d a mistake on 
their part, and although the type had 
been taken down, it has been reset, and 
the extra copies are now being pub- 
lished. 



Monday 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Alice Brady in "The New 
YorK Idea," from the stage 
■access by Langdon Mitchell. 
Among its thrilling scenes is 
■ great borse nee. 

Pathe Review 

•.reel Christie Comedy, 
••Shuffle the Queens." 



The litst issue of the second volume 

of ihr 1,'nziir Blade appeared Jan. loth, 
after • loag. absence. Evidence of the 
downward trend of prices appears in its 
new price of "two Lincolns." 



Sheep Lined Coats from $14.00 up 
Leather Coats from $30.00 to $42.00 

Stylish, well-made, comfortable All Wool 
Overcoats in a style that you will like. 
Specially priced from $35.00 to $55.00 

Most of these are 

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX AKE 

You can easily make a few dollars by 
looking these over before you buy. 



P. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for over 30 years 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 



ma u. ». pat. orr. 



Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business fanner's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

su»sioi»«r or ime amehican «o«icultj«m. chemical »«'«»' 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



PRICES 

Have come down. Candy, paper and notebooks are selling at old rates. 
Now you can afford to have just the notebook you want and to indulge 
that sweet tooth. 

DON'T" GO BY-COME BUY 



KING '21 AWARDED 

POND MEMORIAL MEDAL 

The Allen Leon Pond Memorial Prize 
medal was awarded to Starr M. King '21, 
as a result of the decision of the Allan 
Leon Pond Memorial committee of 
which Harold Gore 'II is the chairman. 
Kinjf played right tackle on the 11)20 
iram. lie was graduated from Adams 
Iliuh School, where he played fullback 
tor two seasons. He played right tackle 
on the 11*20 Freshman team and left 
tackle on the varsity team of 1910. 
This year he was rated as all New 
England tackle. 

Richard K. Field heroines an assistant 
manager of basketball, due to the in- 
eligibility of J. Leonard Walsh '22. 



When serving 

HOUSE PARTIES OR LUNCHES 

consult us. If you do not see 
what you want in our display, 
tell us and we will make it. 



WORK OF EXTENSION 

SERVICE OUTLINED 



W. B. DRURY 

io Main Street. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



College Jewelry -Cuff Link*. Soft Collar Has. 
Iweu Suit Set*. Violin. Banjo. Mandolin Strings 

Fine Watch Repairing, also Breken Leneei 

Replaced I'roin oily. 

32 Mala Street, Amherit. Mate. 



SIN 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 

MERIT 

Judged on the merits of its contribu- 
tion to human welfare the Dairy Indus- 
try ranks first in point of service to 
mankind. 

This service stands or falls upon abil- 
ity to produce milk foods with their nu- 
tritive qualities and delicious flavors 
unimpaired. 

In like manner the distinctive, sani- 
tary cleanliness which the use of 






provides, constitutes a service which 
has contributed largely to the high 
-^tmlard of quality maintained in the 
d of Dairy Production. 

During the year before us you can 
place your orders for this great cleaner 
>» full confidence that the quality which 
Ma given character to this product will 
be steadfastly sustained. 

Indian In circle 



It cleans clean. 



in every pkg. 

Th e J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




Director Willard Gives Survey of the 
Department at Assembly. 

Mr. .bdiu I). Willard, Head of the 
Extension Service, outlined the objects 
and accomplishments of his depart- 
ment Wednesday afternoon, Jan. ;'., in 
liowker Auditorium. This was the tiist 
student assembly of the term, ami 
nearly every seat in the ball was tilled. 
the balcony bein-j occupied be the \o- 
cational and other short course stu- 
dents. According to Professor Patterson 
of Ibe English Department, who in- 
troduced the speaker, the students 
have only a vague idea of what the de- 
partments of the College, including the 
Extension Department, are doing. 

Mr. Wlllajrd stated that the Extension 
Department was, "The College, funct- 
ioning in an educational way for the 
people ol Ihe .'State who are not resident 
at the College." Its object is to take 
the Collage to the people who cannot 
come to the Campus to derive its benc- 
lits. The Extension Service teaches 
the better ways in agriculture, and 
helps to make the home more attrac- 
tive. This project of extension work is, 
however, not uew. It was used as early 
as 17K4 by "Turnip" Toiishend, who 
traveled in England lecturinn on belter 
methods of raising turnips. The Mas- 
sachusetts Society for the Promotion of 
Agriculture was established in 1702. 
The various counties have also formed 
their own bodies; thai of lieikshire 
county having been formed in 1810. 

The organization itself consists in the 
director and his assistants, the county 
agent leader, the State leader, and the 
county agents themselves. The county 
agents take the work directly to the 
farm and the home. It is not so much 
the work of the Stall that is the main 
factor in the progress of the Extension 
Service, as it is the individual farmer. 
The successful farmer is a college by 
himself. Others learn by associating 
with bim individually, and in agricul 
tural co-operativ% associations. 

G. A. C. BASKETBALL GAME 

Continued from page 1 



from the floor and fouls that the 
visitors were able to score. 

Capt. Gowdy makes an unbeatable 
defense man aud Thompson played his 
position as if he bad always been a 
back. Smith and Marshman were the 
headline™ for the home team while 
Alexander's all-round work featured 
the visitor's play. 

The score: 

M. A. C. 

Ota, Kle. Ma. 
Uoser, rf 2 10 14 

Smitb. If 2 4 

Ball. If I (I 

Marshman, c 4 M 

Thompson, rb 

Gowdy, lb 
Hale, lb 



Totals 



Lord, lb 
Put man, rb 
Grunwald, c 
Alexander, If 
Baxter, rf 

Totals 



C. A. C 



1 





2 











9 


10 


M 


(lis. 


Kls. 


l»ta. 


1 





2 


1 





2 


2 





4 


I 


9 


13 


1 





2 



2.3 



Makers of High-grade Cuts for all 
kinds of Publications. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 'PAPER CITY ENGRAVING CO,, IllC. 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Papilla! wilh II. A. ('. Men 

Neit Assembly, \ RIDAY, Jan. 14, at 8 p.m. 

Private lessons bj appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



WMGL 



J5£ a package 



RADCL1FFE BUILDING 

Phone 700 

Holyoke, Mass. 



5£ a Package 



Before toe War 

package 

During the War 



5 



£ a Package 



The Flavor Lasts 
So Does the Price! 





PLAZA 

Northampton . . Hast. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

w nan the Baal 

PHOTO-PLAY 



• • • 

a re eaoa n. 

Program changed daily except Monday 

and Tueiday. 

t kink r. itKi.Muvr. Managi r. 



NOW! 



Full Line of 



COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve yon. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



Candy Shop 



Soda Parlor 



B EC KM AIM'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Maaaachuaette 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IllC. Northampton. Mass. 



An optical nin>i> wtiicii m— aarai ui> t«i tba 
sleTbesI itandsrd of lorn service. \>><i 

<:ui !<•!> on our -.kill and good t.itti? in all 
Optical lliattlTrl. 



Our Art Department la Riled with picture! 

suitable foi t be decoration of l rat" I tea, 

or foi birthday ami wedding elfta. U re* ting 
card* for particulai people. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 12, 1921, 



BUY NOW WHEN YOU CAN GET 
VALUES FOR YOUR MONEY! 

We are selling everything from 20 to 33 1-3 per cent discount for cash. 

Shirts are always a good buy when the price is reduced. 

We are cleaning out our Overcoats and Ready-made Suits below cost. 



SOPHOMORE MEMBERS OF 

HOP COMMITTEE CHOSEN 

Tlw Sophomore class held an Impor- 
tant meeting Wednesday, Jen, "> after 
assembly for tbe purpose of electing a 
Soph-Senioi Hop Committee. Donald 
B. Alexander of Boeheater, Owen E. 
Kolsom of Boallndale, Robert 1>. Puller 
oi Woi.iini, Bleb mood 11. Bargent of 

Buxton, Main.-, I'rancis Huckley of 

Natiek, Howard Gordon <«i Ipswich, and 
Pred Seats of Dalton, were elected. A 
smoker committee consisting of rUay« 
son, ebalnaaa, Sargent and If obor was 
elected. 

CAMPUS NOTES 
A.t a meeting held on the evening of 
.Ian. '>, tbe Informal Committee de< Wed 
to have iiic next Informal January SIS, If 
supported. There will bea stand oa 
tlif matter la Assembly today. No 
other baeineae was tranacted at Ibe 
meeting. 

The \ . M. < : A. will Dondact Its 
regular weekly bnsineee meeting In 
Btockbrldge ball after Aneembly to-day. 

Wednesday night, .Jan. IS, Willis Tan- 

ner, a regular student at Ibe college 
will give in illnetrated lecture on bis 

native country. "Japan." 



MUSICAL CLUBS' TRIP 

Continued from page 1 

lighting trim fori lie performance, which 
was oalled at 8p.m. Heedleee toeay, 
the dance which followed was well par- 
ticipated 'm '>>' both audience and clubs. 
While at Stowe the men were |>ul up 
for the night at the private houses of 

(he towns] pie, who very kindly 

opened wide their doors lor the accoin- 

, latlon of the elnba. Tbe fellows 

united in praise ol the hospitality ot 

these people, and all agreed that they 
oonld not have been better treated. 

Manager Howard ■neeeeded la Rath- 
ertng together most of bta floek" again 

in the South Station, Hoslon. Thursday 
night, in readiness for the S Iham 

ooncert, which was ilvea In the Need* 

ham town hall. Following I his concert . 
most of the men went to their homes 
around Boston, or With friends, until 
Saturday Bight. 

The program was practically the 

same for the three • ceils, and was as 

published In the Coixnet vn lot ike 

Hadley concert, Dee. 10. The short 
Sketch l>v Don Davidson "21, seemed 

eepeciallj well appreelated, whllelbe 

quartet who were encored time and 
again, made a decided hit at each con- 
ceit will) their clever soil's, the Glee 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



PRES. BUTTERFIELDS REPORT 

Continued from page 1 

sufficient. 

"The building situation has become 
not only discouraging but almost dis- 

beerteolng. No major ballding lias 

been provided tor seven years." New 

departments have no bonalng place and 

old OOtS inadequately housed a dozen j 

years ago have not had their facilities] 

improved. In the report a permanent 

building program and the financial sup- 
port of it are asked for again. In ask- 
ing for increased maintenance and new 

ballding I'rexy says, "These appropria- 
tions are absolutely essential in order 
that the college shall render its full , 

service t« the entire population of the Main an j WoTthington Streets 

( ommon wealth." 

In conclusion he said, "Is our College 

to be regarded as a aeceaaary nuisance, 

or as an object of the most liberal possi- 
ble support because it is considered in- 
dispensable to the economic and social 

progreeeof the state.' Can [ poaeiblj 

be mole clear in stating that this insti- 
tution is not our institution ".' it does 
not belong to tbe trustees or to the lac- 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Give ui a trial. 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 

G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



What do you know about Japan? You I Q< ] >i- t lt4 i, ,i i M clnbe come infortbelr 

will learn something about our neigh- L nar- ,,f prmtee, as they showed g 1 

bor by coming to French Hall, B a F, re-B | w from their Intensive training. 

Thursday, Jan. IS at 6 p. M. 4 led are Tbe addition of four Freshmen na this 

with sleleoplian views. Will b« glVCU ,,.,,, ,,,,^,.,1 ;l v; ,l,,;,!de asset to t he Man- 
by W. Tanner, under the enapicee of | dulln clu0 

the V. II. C. A. Watch the eanipUK 



ally, it belongs t<» Ike people ol tbe 

slate. We are their trustees for its 
effectiveness. We simply report the 

conditions onderwbieb it can be made 
fully effective. We will be derelict In 

our diuy if we fail to indicate tbe terms 
either financial or administrative under 

which we believe it can be made most 
effective." 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUGS AND CARPETS 

- K. I). MAHSli K.STATK- 



blllboards lor fun her not ins regarding 
word edueat ion. 
President Butterheld add r ea a e d the 

student body at Monday morning's 

ehapel, January 101 b. lie dwelt on re- 
ligion la connection with labor condi- 
tions of ihe day and the general social 
unrest prevailing. He emphasized Ihe 
tact that religion is the remedy needed 
for the existing conditions, and he 
brought out atronglj the meat lack of 
religion among American businessmen. 

A Series Ol lectures has 1 n sched- 
uled for ihe winter by the Pomology 
club. <>n Jan. 18, the net d talk of 

the season will DC given by Mr. Charles 
Gould of the Pomology Department. 
The remaining lectures will be as 

follows: Feb. l: "Opportunities for 
Orcharding la New England", by Mr. 

Van Meier: Feb. 1.",: "I'lunis. Wild and 
Cultivated", bv Prof. Waugh; March 

l: Program to be announced; election 
of officers; March 15: "Movlee", "The 
Citrus Fro.i1 Induatrlea". 

The bi-monthly meeting of the Ani- 
mal Husbandry Club will he held Wed- 
nesday evening, .Ian. 12. in Btockbrldge 
Hall. Proaeasor Judkins Of the Dairy 
Department will discuss tbe history and 
the present problems in the dairying 

industry, eepeciallj as relates to New 

England. Every one letereated is in- 
vited to attend. Prealdent Fletcher of 
the dab announces that an active pro- 
gram Is being planned tor tbe comlag 
year. At the regular meet Inge held 

aver] other Wednesday, thete will be 

course discuasione by practical breeders 

and by repieseiitat i ves of the various 

breeding associations. Several moving 
picture films with interesting speakers 

to accompany them have also been en- 
gaged to come here during tbe season. 



Bj far tbe crowning event ol tbe trip 
van the Copley Ptaaa concert, aa waa 

entirely Biting. Held in the Swiss 
Boom, this was largely attended by 

undergraduates and alumni with their 
wivee and friend*, making a gathering 

of about BO couple.-,. Enthusiasm and 
Aggie spirit pervaded the air. and the 

audience showed its appreciation of the 
Clube by repealed [encores. The men 

r.-ponded to this show of appreciation 
bj putting forth their best efforts to 

make this the best conceit vet. The 
audience was seated around the sides ol 

the hall, and dancing immediately fol- 
lowed Ihe concert, lasting until 1140 i\ 
M. In regards to this concert, which in 
an annual affair, plans are bwtwg made 

to hold next year's concert in the ball 
room (d the hotel, and to make the con- 
ceit a New Year's F.ve affair. 

The following men were taken on the 
trip, beside managers Howard and 

bowery: 

1981- Fletcher. Qoff.Haalam, Howard, 
Labrovlte, Lincoln, Martin, L. P., New- 
ton. Sloan, Starkey. Davidson. 

1983— Burnham, Dolman. Huesey, 

Martin, K., Moody, Mosely. Spring. Vin- 

ten, Waugh. 

IPgg— Arlington. Fanenl. Fuller. Nor- 
eroBS, Richards. Sears. Slade. ToWOO, C. 
A., Wendell. Whiilier, Martin. K. F, 

Bennett, Broderlek. 
I«.»i4 -Bowes, Kennedy. Lamb,Lotlng. 



Johfl II. Dockhart '-'_'. left "Aggie" 
Tbnrsdaj • " attend New York Cniver- 
sitv. 



Oct the Habit 

I. M. LABROVITZ 

The Leading Tailor hihI 

dents Fumi*hing» 

— Full Dress Suits to Beat — 

Clot bee Spo ng e d and pressed by 

Moffmmn Machine 

Our Work (s Ouaron l ee d . 

Come ami open an account with me. 
Phonm 302-W 

11 Amity St., Amherst, Muss. 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

— AT — 

Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLtES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



*«i 



BIDE-A-WEE' 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other sjses things to eat. 

MRS. I-. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel.416-W) Hadley. »!:•- 



KINGSLEY'S henry adams & co, 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, - Ma*| 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



CHANGES IN FACULTY 

Continued from page 1 

ral Economics Department, WOO was 
recently operated on fol appendl6ll.il. 

His appointment is temporary. 

Mr. K. I). Sanborn conies to M. A. C. 
as extension professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. Lie is a former N. II. State 
athlete, and bis name may be laniilar 
to Aggie aluuiui of a few years back. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place fo» 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






I \RYoft 

•it* 

JAN I 9 1921 

AkiIci ilr i irtil 



MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 



No. 11 



VARSITY FIVE TO CAST ls SELECTED 

INVADE VERMONT F0R PR0M SH0W 



Will Take On U. V. M. Friday and 
Middlebury Saturday. 

tin Friday tbe basketball team leaves 
lor their trip to Vermont, where the] 
will play the I'niversiiy of Vermont 

iiida> sight and oe Saturday will take 

on Middlebury at Middlebury. These 
will be the lirst games away from home 
Ibis seaaol and it ibe team plays against 
i he t.ieeii Mountain boys willi the 
-one Bash they ba\e displayed in their 
wins against Conn. Aggie ami Went- 
Worth lastltate, two more wins will be 

chalked up let M. A. c. 

Verjf little is known of Veil it's 

Dgtl M thin is the lirst season in 

leveral years that basketball has been 

i varsity sport, and an entirely new 
iqaad lias had l<> he developed. Al- 
though defeated in their litst game 

with Albany Law School, I he J have 
greatly improved Intel] as a result ol 

much bard practise ami part lei pal loo 
In exhibition eonteste. (apt. Beldger, 
wh bei beene*wrted to ft'l 'hi' position 
i. ii vaceal by the resignation of Capt, 
Harris, will lead a strong quinlel 
against M. A. C. and a good contest is 
certain to be on tap. 

Middlebury has alreadv played seven 

games, splitting even in victories. The) 

defeated Albany Law School. 18-31, 
lust to Dartmouth, 81*19, and lost b] 
dose SOereS to both Harvard and New 
Hampshire State. On Saturday they 

defeated Northeaetern, :::; i". Leonard 
who plays forward, is easily tbe sterol 

the leant and his work against M. A. C. 

will be watched with Internet, a rerj 

fast game may be expected, with 

Middlebury poeeesalag the advantage ot 

being on the home surtace. and M. A. 

' i lie faster team. 



MIDWINTER ALUMNI DAYS 
SET FOR FEBRUARY 4 AND 5 



An Interesting Program Has Been 
Provided for the Occasion. 

Winter Alumni Day this year will be 

"i re importance than ever before. 

mseol the large number of reluru- 

• 1 1 1 tn it i and (be fact that the day 

will be considered a part of theSenii- 

enelal program of the college. A 

B ■ program has been arranged, and a 

lal invitalion to visit classes has 

H extended by tbe departments to 

■ retnrnlag alumni. 
i tie program begins with the visiting 

"' i lasses and inspection of the eollegC 

Friday morning, Feb. 4, and termi- 

B« with the Fraternity banquets to 

held at 7-30 Saturday evening. A 

plimeutary alumni supper will he 

i Fiiday eveniim at ti o'clock in 

Draper Hall, and as many underurad- 

— will attend as can be aecotnino- 

Continued on page 6 



Dramatis Personnae of " School for 

Scandal" Includes Sixteen 

Lower Class Men. 

"The School For Scandal", a comedy 
in live sets by Blohard l>. Sheridan will 

he presented by Ihe lioisiei Doisler 
Dramatic lesociatloB lor the Junior 
Prom. This comedy has been placed 

at ihe bead of the English comic drams, 

and was lirst acted in 1777 al Diui\ 
l.ane. Notwithstanding this fact, Ihe 
play is entirely modern In its sentiment, 
and may be regarded as a well directed 

take-off on the times. Seldom has a 
piece met with e<|tial success, and it le- 
lains its place to this da] as a (lawless 
specimen id an acted comedy. 

a large numbei ol irould»bs actors 

and aelresees met at the Social Union 
ii is, Friday Right, Jan. 14, and as a 

result oi a strong competition the fol- 
io winf east o| characters were chosen 
by Ibe judges who were I'lol. Hand, 

laeiiiiy manager: Bdgholt, President; 

Kilman, manager: and Davidson: 

■ • •■" 
Sir < Hiver.Mii laee Francis S. Kleicber t\ 

Charles Surface Carl M. Boghoil '21 
joe Borfaes bV>beti F. K. Martin '*.\ 
t rabtrce Faiie s. Carpenter '24 

lluwley Itussell D. Haker '21 

Mose~ Edwin II. Warren 'ii 

mi Beaj. Backbite Bobert M. Darling "24 
Careless Cbarlee II. Anderaon *81 

Sir Harry Bumper 

Lawrence K. Uroderick '2:t 
Snake CICOU B. Johnson 'M 

I lip James I.. Williams '24 

servant to I.ady Sneerwell 

Robert L. Jones 21 

Servant to Joseph S. 

Koger B. Friend 'tS 

Maid lo Sir Pater 

Miss Mildred H. Lyons 24 

girTob] Oeorge H. Loekwood '21 

Lady Speerwell 

Miss Hose F. Labrovit/. '2:1 

Mrs. Candoor 

Miss Bteaaor W. Batemaa '2:1 

Lady Teaale Miss Frances It. Martin '2:1 
^| ar i a Miss In/a A. Moles j.i 

On account of the exceptionally large 
east ol twenty characters, opportunity 
has been given to lest much new talent, 
especially from tbe Freshman el 
\|.ss Batemaa, Miss Martin, and Miss 
Holes took part in the very successful 
Freshman play last year. Loekwood, 
Fletcher, Jones. Anderson, Haker, 
Bog bolt, Friend, and Davidson are 

members of tbe Bolster Doisters, having 

taken part in previous dramatics, and 
the best is sure lo attend their work. 
Kehearsals will start as SOOS as possible 
and every etlort will be made to pro- 
duce a play of tbe highest quality. 



Q. T. V. announces the pledging of 
Edward A. Kane '24 of Westlield. 



M. A. C. VS. HARVARD AT 

CAMBRIDGE WEDNESDAY 



Hockey 8even will Also Meet M. I. T. 
and Tufts on Boston Trip. 

Tbe present week promisee Ui bea 

busy one for Ibe aggie hockey seven. 
The team leaves lodaj on a Ibree game 
trip to Boston, (lames are scheduled 
with Harvard tonight, with M. I.T. Fri- 
day afternoon and wiib Tufts Salurdav 

afternoon. The name tonight will be 

played in Ibe new Arena but Ibe otbei 
two aie dependenl on the weather as 
I bey will bave lo be pla.ved out ol 
doors. 

The game with Harvard tonight will 

be t he hardest on the M . A . ( Mheilu le, 
anil the Maroon and While will lie pla>- 
lag againel odds when she hues up 

sgalnsl tbe Crimson. Harvard is prob- 
ably t he strongest college team oa Ibe 

ice this winter. She opened Ibe season 

with a 1» lo I victory over Kinus College 

and has also beatCS Ihe strong B, A. A. 

Continued on page 7 



C. RAYMOND VINTEN IS 

JUNIOR PROM CHAIRMAN 



Professor J. B. Abbot is handling 
temporarily the extension work of the 
Agronomy Department. 



Active Preparations Under Way for 

the Biggest and Beit Junior Prom 

April 15, 10, and 17. 

April If), 1(1 and 17. The dale lor 
Junior From has been set at tbCM three 
days. Here is a chance for (hose who 
like a good dance to have the best lime 
of I heir four years in college. This 
\ ear's I'roin is going to be a higher and 

better affair than any which has aver 

been held at Aggie. At this early date 
a surprisingly large numbei of men 
have handed in their names lo ibe 

chairman ol the committee so as to be 

sure of a ticket. The "prelims" will be 
out next week. The price ol the From 

dance iiseit will be approximately $10. 

Three dollars is lo be paid as a deposit 

tor t be "prelims 
Charles Bayesond Vlaten of Beaton 

has been elected chairman of (he From 
Committee. Vlntea has already dem- 
onstrated his ability as an ellicienl 
worker. His Sophomore year was broken 
up when he entered ibe navy, but since 
his le entrance into college he has been 
an active member of tbe S<jnih t', >ard, 

beini managing editor ibis year, lit- 
is also leader of the college quartet and 
a principle in both the Qiao club and 

Mandolin club. His election is a pop- 
ular one. He is a member of Ihe Theta 
(hi fraternity. 

Active preparations lor From were 
started last week Wednesday at a meet- 
ing of the committee held alter the 
Junior Smoker in the Social Union. 
The seven members were divided with 
(he following duties for e ach : Decora- 
lions Spring, Thompson, ami Vinten: 
supper — Smith ; music — Waugh and 
Moseley : programs — Clark and Stni(h; 
finances —Clark. These divisions are at 
Continued on p»g» • 



VARSITY SEPTET WINS 
AND LOSES CLOSE GAMES 

Amherst Beaten, 2-1. Dartmouth 

Wins, 3-2, in Two Five Minute 

Overtimes. 

Ibe M \.C. hockey team got away 
to a good start Wednesday afternoon 
when it took the Ambers! College seven 
into camp in ibe lirst game on the new 
link. The score w;is 'I lo 1 but this 
hardly shows Ihe relative ability of the 
two na ins Ambersl was outplayed in 
every dt pariineiil and only fine work 
by goa (tender Pllropton,kepl the Aggie 
score down. The Amherst cage was 
fairly peppered with shots while "Phil" 
Newell had ouij six slops during the 
afternoon. 

Harold Poole was in the game at 
point and though he only recently 
joined t he sipiad he put up a tine game, 
lie scored liisi loi Annie early in the 
opening period, caging the puck from 
close range after dribbling down the 
ice lUtOUKh Ibe Ambersl defence. 

The second Aggie goal also came in 
Mi«> i'tsi half I yons was i he player to 
score from in front of Ihe net following 
a long shot by Collins, Which rebounded 

from Plimpton's stick. 

The second period proved to be faster 
than tbe Href ami al limes Ihe play was 
rather rough. Seveial limes the Aggie 
forwards brought the puck down the 
ice with a rush only lo have ii warded 
oil by a line slop al Ihe Amherst goal. 
Captain McCarthy and Mausell were 
particularly prominent Iii this attack 
but they could not gel the puck past 
the I'm pie and While goal tend. 

The only Ambelst score came late in 
the last half. If was a pretty BBOt to 
ihe corner of the net made by Captain 
Davidson, after dribbling nearly the 
length of Ihe rink. 

The game was fast throughout, and 
while Ambersl fought hard in the last 
half, the M. A. C. team held Ihe advan- 
tage at all times. The puck was in the 
visitors' territory most of the time. 

Probably the feature of the Aggie 
play was I he work of "Sharkey'T.yons. 
Besides scoring one of ihe goals he 
turned in some fine defensive work. 
The Maroon and While was particularly 
strong on t he defensive work. Collins 
and I'oole proved a pair hard toget by and 
Hansel 1 and Lyons were also prominent 
in breaking up Amherst rushes. Captain 
McCarthy played his usual whirlwind 
game and Collins also featured. Gor- 
don put up a very creditable exhibition 
in his lirsl varsity game. 

Plimpton was easily the headliner for 
Amherst, his work at Ihe net being of s 
high calibre. Captain Davidson also 
Bams in for honors while Clark proved 
himself a dangerous man with the puck. 

The lineup: 



M. A. 0. 

McCarthy, rw 
Manse!!, Snow, r 



AMMKKHT. 

lw, Metoalf 
r, Clark 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 




Lyons, o c, Davidson 

(ionlon, \nderson, Haskins, lw 

rw. TitUH 
Collins, cp cp, Worcester 

Poole, p P, Wilcox 

Newell, g g, Plimpton 

Score— M. A. C. 2, A nib erst 1. Score 
at ball time— M. A. C. 2, Amherst 0. 
Goals Pia.lc by Poole, Lyons, Davidson, 
Referee — Hullen, <«oal judges— Mc- 
Inlosli, Jones. Time— 20 minute 

lr IveH. 



M. A. C. DEFEATS BOSTON 

FIVE BY 36-12 SCORE 



FtfbtlBg all the way for a victory the 
aggressive Atmie st'xlci was Itarely 
nosed out of a win by Coach 'luck's 
speedy Dartmouth outfit In the last live 
miiiuics of a double overtime period 
name on the hitter's Alumni Oval rink, 
Sat unlay, by a 15-2 score. 

Aunieat the start , assumed t&OftgfTM 
sive and earned the puek into the 
Green's territory, [a ■ stitT sciima^e 
the puck was chased all over that end 
of the rink until BoM tlie speedy Dart* 
iiioiith wing, captured the puck, drib- 
bled it the leogtfa of the link and 
shoved aci'uss the initial tally. Manscll 
was robbed ot a count by Neid linger 's 
close stop soon after. Tne shooting of 
"Sonny" kept the (Ireen goal 00 his 
toes the entire period. Sands made the 
second score for Dartmouth by a well 
placed shot from the side of the rink. 
With the referee's whistle at the end of 
the half, Tuck's warriors led 2-0. 

Tho playing of both teams in the sec- 
ond half in all lines far outclassed thai 
of the first half. The Aggie olfeiisive 
took the lead and Snow gaining the 
puck dribbled it up the iee and pushed 
aneatfual past Neldltnger. Within a 
few minutes of the tirst tally Mansell 
scored the second by a well directed 
shot from about 86 feet before the Green 
goal. This brought the Dartmouth 
rooters to their feet. Both teams strug- 
gled for the winning count but neither 
was able to penetrate the other's Strong 
defense. The speedy and shifty play 
put up by Captain McCarthy kept the 
Green defensive on their toes. At the 
close of the period the score was a 2-2 
tie. 

No count was made daring the first 
live minutes overtime period. Each 
team directed its shots accurately but 
the clever work of Newell and Neid- 
linuei checked the scoring, The win- 
ning tally for Dartmouth came with a 
fast advance by the Green offense and a 
close shot before the Aggie goal by 
Captain Kothchild. The tinal score 
stood 3-2. 

In speed and attack the Aggie seven 
had the edge on their opponents. The 
strong teamwork and follow-up of Ross 
and Sands, the Dartmouth wings, feat- 
ured the playing of the Hanover team. 
The lineup; 

M. A. C. DARTMOUTH. 

McCarthy, rw rw, Smith 

Snow, lw lw, Ross 

Lyons, c c, Rothschild 

Mansell, r r, Perry 

Poole p p, Dorney 

Collins, cp cp, Foster 

Newell, g g. Xeidlinger 

Substitutions — Gordon for Snow. 
Sands for Smilh.Snow for Gorden, Smith 
for Sands, Gordon for Snow, Smith for 
Sands. Coals — Koss, Sands, Rothschild, 
Snow, Mansell. Referee — Eaion. Time 
— two 20 minute periods; two 5 minute 
overtime periods. Goal umpires — Bill- 
ings, Douglass. 



SPEAKER TALKS ON SOCIALISM 



Roser, Marshman and Smith Feature. 
Aggie Teamwork a Strong Factor. 

The varsity quintet won its second 
game of the season on the Drill Hall 
Boor last Saturday afternoon when it 
defeated Wentworth Institute of Boston 
by a 36 to 12 score. The team from 
Boston was not up to the standard of 
the Aggie live. Their play lacked the 
efficient teamwork and passing that 
characterized the play of the home 
team. 

The work of Roser and Marshman 
was very good. These two men were 
constantly within range of their op- 
oneots basket and on several occassions 
brought the cheering section to its feet 
by their skillful shooting. Marshman 
was particularly good on shots from 
beneath the basket while Roser and 
Smith got several baskets from the fif- 
teen foot mark. 

Wentworth had the first chance to 
score after about thirty seconds of play, 
but missed. They gained one point 
Shortly after though, when McXeir shot 
a tool. Roser followed this with a foul 
lot M. A. C. and Marshman added two 
more points with the tirst basket of the 
fame. A few minutes later Marshman 
mad* his second score and Smith fol- 
lowed with a basket from the sideline. 
Two or three foul shots which were suc- 
eesefal and a basket bv Roser brought 
the score to 10-4 in Aggie's favor. For 
three or four minutes after this uearly 
every shot tried was successful. Roser 
scored twice from the floor aud once 
from foal. Smith, Gowdy, and Marsh- 
man each scored from the floor and Mc- 
Neil sored two points for Wentworth 
with shots from the foul line. A unique 
feat are Of this half was a triple foul on 
Aggie followed immediately by a 
double foul on Wentworth. Roser 
scored once more from under the basket 
sad the half ended MM in favor of M, 
A. ('. 

The second half was not as good an 
exhibition of basketball as the first 
half had been. Smith scored twice, and 
Marshman and Thompson each got 
credit for a basket. In this half fully 
twenty-live shots by the Aggie men hit 
the edge of the Wentworth basket and 
bounded away while in direct contrast 
the shots in the first half were nearly 
all successful. The game ended with 
the score 36-12 after Roser had shot a 
foul on the last play. 

The work of Roser and Marshman, 
with Gowdy's fine defense work still 
stands out in Aggie's play. McXeir 
and Roberts were the only two of the 
visitors who were able to get down the 
floor at all. 



Professor Crook, at Wednesday As- 
sembly, Reviews New York 
Debate. 



Prof. J. W. Crook of Amherst Col- 
lege addressed the student body Wed- 
nesday afternoon Jan, 12. lie related 
in a most interesting manner a few 
details of the Socialists banquet at Xew 
York and gave an essence of the debate 
held that evening. The subject was 
"Is Capitalism Collapsing?" Professor 
Crook brought out the following points 
as presented by the various speakers. 
Capitalism is that system of industry 
in which the world markets, stock ex- 
change, and working people are part of. 
In times before the program of this in- 
dustry was different than that of today. 
Capitalists and labor were more closely 
associated. They felt to be on level 
with each other. Labor could work 
with the hope of becoming owner them- 
selves. They could even hope to be- 
come part of the capitalists family by 
an alliance of marriage. Their position 
was one of equality. Today the system 
has changed. The Capitalists aim is en- 
tirely different. Instead of wishing to 
produce for the good of the people, 
their only aim is to make wealth and 
build up a fortune for themselves. As 
a result, labor has become disheartened 
and rebellious. Agitation among them 
has become widespread and industrial 
turmoil reigns today. 

06.— Mr. and Mrs. II. Mosely an- 
nounce the birth of a baby daughter, 
Lita Mae Mosely. 



(let the Habit 

I.M.LABROVITZ 

The Leading Tailor and 

Gents' Furnishings 

— Full Dress Suits to Rent — 

Clothes sponged and pressed by 

Hoffman Mmchinm 

Our Work fa Cnuranteed. 

Come and open an accouut with me. 

Phone 302-W 

11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



OWN HALL 



Th A SI I'KU l'KOKt <TION DAY! 

nurs y ^^ , B , He- 8 an 

again DoagUs '•»«*•.■*• 
Hat. at 3 in "Th. Mollycoddle. I 

b ., • reels of Fairbanks honor, 

■»•• 2 "*""*•. ihrlili. speod ;«n.l sctton. 

6-45, 8-30 Nt . w and origins! In uti.ry and 

I action. Far from anything 

. that s been attempted before. 
Mat. I7c, 22c N#w$ Top i Cf Comedy 
Kve.2Sc. 33e 



Mutt and Jeff 



Constance Binney in"Somt. 
KriilaV * hlB * Different/' from < al 
I I lliu y ,,,.,„„-, prisoner." by Alice 

inier Miller. 

Scenic reel 
Nat. at 3 "Salome vs. Shena nd oah, 

Eve. at 8 MacK Sennetfe funniest 
Comedy.witn an all star est. 

Tom Moore and Naomi 
Childen in "Lord and Lady 

Alky." from the Broadway 

Ms* at 1 stage success. 

Ev.*VshL "Th. King of the Chrou" 
6-45. 8-30 News Comedy 



Saturday 



Constance Talmadge and 

Monday K.».»l- iti 

a howling comedy-drama, an 

Anita I.oos and John Kmer 
Mat at 3 B,> " production. 

Eve at 8 ** th * »« vi * w 

2- r eel Christie Comedy 



A SPECIAL SUIT 

Single or double breasted in a cheerful brown effect, cut form-fitting, at $50 
for young men. Hand tailored — character in every curve. Individuality 
in every line. Overcoats in very snappy models from $40 to $75. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

Ho mm ot Hart Schmffnor t. Marx Clot horn 

144 Main Street, Northampton 



Wentworth 

IK, Van Iderstine 

rg, Kennedy 

rg, Ralph 

c, McNeir 

If, RobertB 

If, Woodward 



Seniors majoring in Landscape Gard- 
ening are planning the grading, plan t - 
ing and ueneral development of the 
grounds about Adams House and the 
Memorial Building. 



The score: 
M. A. C. 
Roser, rf 
\. W. Smith, If 

Ball, If 
Marshman, c 
Thompson, rg 
Uale, rg 
Gowdy, lg(Capt.) 

(Capt.) rf, Wolstenholme 
Baskets from floor— Roser 4, Marsh- 
man 4. Smith 4, Thompson, Gowdy, 
Roberts I, ami McXeir. Baskets from 
foul — Roser 8, McNeil 3, and Roberts 3. 
Referee— Garland of Holyoke. Timer— 
Mol.aughlin of M. A. C. Scorer-Bun- 
ker Of M • A . C. 

'95.— College friends of George A. 
Billings will regret to hear of the death 
of his beloved wife on Dec. 1. The 
interment was at Dayton, Ohio. 



When You Ar© Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 

— FOR — 

Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Why go up town when the Aggie Inn makes a 
specialty of Sunday night suppers and waffles ? 

INN YE GOOD EATING P 



SENIORS AND SOPHOMORES 
COME THRU IN CLASS GAMES 



ADDRESS ON EVILS 

OF BOLSHEVISM 



Defeat Two Year and Juniors Res- 
pectively. 

The second set of interdass basket- 
ball games Friday night, Jan, 14, at the 
Drill Hall, saw the Juniors defeated 
again, this time by the Sophomores to 

the tune of 13-10. The Seniors made 
up tor their defeat last week by rruiHter- 
iny; a 15-12 victory over tbe 2-year team, 
which made its tirst appearance on the 
Hour In this game. Accordingly, the 
NophomoieN have two games to theii 
credit, being tied for first place with 
the Freshmen, who have won their only 
Basse. 

The .Innior-sophom<»re tilt, especially 
in the tirst half, was marked by pool 
•bootleg ami lack of systematic team- 
work. There were plenty of personal 
foals called on both sides, and t lie three 
points made by Tumey '23, on fouls, 
SOOOnetS for the tinal score of the name. 
In the second half the Juniors canghl 
up, Making the score P-M. Both cams 
then played nip and tuck, each making 
oae basket, but Tnmey's next twin- 
counter soon put the game on ice. lie 
wms high scorer for '23, while Beal and 
Hunter also put up a fast name, Itaii- 
dall '22 played wall at center until re- 
lieved by Acheson, and. with Weetseb, 
did much of the soaring for tbe Juniors. 
The lineup: 

HI23 19H 

Wentsch, rf k', Alger, Hunter 

Webber, If r-j, (Jrayson 

Randall* C c, Tumey 

l.ewandowski, rg In, Beal 

t'htrk, Acheson, lg rf, Sargent 

Been — '23, 13; '22, 10. Referee — 
Qravsoa. 

The second game was a good exhibi- 
tion of basketball, despite the fact that 
the Seniors were always in the lead. 
Qood shooting ability was revealed on 
both sides. Lent '21 caned several line 
"ins, but Stevensand (iirard of the S. C, 
also had their eyeson the basket, and 
the work of these two clever forwards 
always made the name uncertain. Alter 
the 2-year, with two successive baskets, 
had come to within three points of their 
opponents, the game took on new life, 
but theSeniorssoon gained afresh lead. 
Waiteand Brigham '21 put up a consist- 
ent name, while Green and Stevens did 
steller work for their team. The lineup: 
ions Two-ykai: 

Lent, rf lg, Grant. Clongh 

Davis, If rg, Maggi 

Hriirhara, c c, Green 

Waits, rg if, Stevens 

Kio, lg rf, Girard 

score— '21, 15; T. Y., 12. Referee- 
hall. 



Peter W. Collins Speaks at Sunday 
Chapel. 

A very instructive talk was given at 
Chapel last Sunday morning by Mr. 
Peter W. Collins of t he Knights of Co- 
lumbus, Boston. In it he dealt partic- 
ularly with Bolshevism, what it really 
is and its ■ignincanes in respect to so- 
cial conditions in this country. He 
yave a brief history of Bolshevism and 
told how it differed in form from other 
socialistic movements. Bolshevism is 
mainly true,applied,socialisin. It really 
Originated from the soap box orators 
and other crack-brained fanatics, and 
not from the mass of working people. 
The Working man in the main does not 
benin to feel dissatisfied until told by 
the orators that he is being radically 
wronged and should make his power 
trident in order that be may obtain his 
rinhts. The commons look upon the 
subject from only one side. The build- 
inns they have built do not really be- 
long to them as the orators tell them. 
They build them, thai much is true, 
but they were paid for their time and 
energy. It is the flowery words, not 
(lie ideas of the orators that stir the 
masses. Socialism is e.\ pressed in two 

media — the collegiate language and the 

language Of the uneducated. The <>r- 

aiois employ what collegiate phrases 

they happen to know and so befog then 
listeners with a lauguane (hat is be- 
yond their comprehension so that as a 
result they are lead to believe things 
which they would not if allowed to 
exercise their reason. 

Socialism contradicts religion and 
the ten commandments. The speaker 
brought out the fact that Bolshevism 

Blast be subdued by education. The 

general ignorance coneerning what 
Bolshevism really is, Is the cause of its 
spread. If the working people really 
know what Bolshevism is, as it is being 
worked out in Russia, they would try 
by every possible means to escape it 
rather than lauding a longing ear to 
whatever demagog holds the soap box. 



The Poultry Judging team of four 
mn on who are majoring in poultry, 
including J. A" Hagar, A. C. Ashforth. 
> Tattan, and N. f:. Lincoln, leaves 
here Wednesday for the Madison Square 
Garden, New York. Thursday at nine 
they will take part in a judging com- 
lion in which seven other agricul- 
tural colleges are to be represented. 
■tnoagst which are Connecticut, New 
>, Xew York, and North Carolina. 
team has been coached by Profes- 
sor Banta. 



JUNIOR PROM PLANS 

Continued from page 1 

work ami extensive plans are being 
made for tbe decorations and supper. 
The orchestra will be announced within 
a few days. 

Besides the regular Prom dame on 
Friday night there will be the usual 
week-end attractions. The first of these 
is the Prom cabaret which is held from 
2-00 to MO on Saturday afternoo'n. The 
oombined Musical Clubs will give selec- 
tions while an orchestra will furnish 
music for dancing. The usual refresh- 
ments and drinks will be in abundance. 
At h-00 o'clock the Prom show will be 
staged |in Slockbridge flail. Tbe 

show to he presented this year is 
"The School for Scandal ." Several fra- 
ternities plan to bald short house 
dances after Ibis performance. Sunday 
morning the Prom gaeats are cordially 
invited to chapel exercises and in the 
afternoon a concert is to be given in 
BtoekbridgC Hall by tbe Albert Sanda 
Quintette. 



WEBSTER'S STDDIO 

Nash Block 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



K.ta ■i.iaaan IHV1 

Stkphkn Lank Foi.gkb, Unci 

MANIirACTIIHINO JEWK1.ERN 

1HO KKOAUWAY, NBW YOKK 

ObUB AND I'ot.l.l-.t.l-. 
I'INH AM) KINCJH * 

• OLD. alLTM AND HONXI MWItAl.ft 

Suits Pressed, 65c 

on Sanitary Pressing Machine. 

LABR0VITZ,11 Amity Street 



SKK OUR LINK OK 



Wool Sport Hose 

Just tho hose for comfort to 
wear with low shoes, A good 
assort men t of colorings, excellent 
qualities and reasonably priced. 

$2.25, $2.98, $3.19, $3.98 pair. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



DRAPER HOTEL. 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

**Jfeastma6U in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mass. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



F*e»ice'» Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 



MORANDI - PKOCTOR COMPANY 

Manufacturers institution Cooking Apparatus 



of 



86 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON 



C&rptrvter St Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass 



— 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Lacrbnck P. Maktin "21. K<litor-tn-< hief 

RobKRT I.. Jonks t» Mansgina Kclltor 

AB80<IATK KlMTOUS. 

Qioror W. Soman "21 

Kbknkth A. Bahnauo "£l 

8tani.«y w. nunn "at 

I'AII. I.. St KNKTT 'Tl 

Hohakt W. SeitiNi. "2-2 

ItKi.niNn F. JACKSOM '2*2 

JllHN M. WllllTIKK "2» 
I.. H. Aiumnoion "2H 

HlTBINBRK DEPAKTMK.NT. 

Hkkhkki I.. OKr.it '21. Business Manager 

Evkrktt C. Preston "21 Advertising Manager 
Chaki.kh A. BOOH II Circulation Manager 

MVKON <i. MlHHAV "22 

HOLDK.N WlllTTAKKK "2.H 

OWEN E. KOI.BOM '28 



and makes him one of a unified student 
body. Those who have experienced it 
remember it its a powerful influence in 
building their characters. 

l'rcxy says that iiere "new dei>art- 
ments have no ahiding place.'' That is 
an unfortunate truth. Hut the training 
that an Aggie man now yets in linding 
a place "where to lay his head" will 
surely tit him for any search, later in 
life, tor a limb on which to build a 
matrimonial "love nest". We surely 
need more dormitories at M. A. C. 



Subscription |BJfj per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered atwcond-olaM matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage pro\ tiled for In section 110S. Act 
of October. 1917 jnulioilwil August 20. 1918. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



8-(Ml I 



7-40 \ 
7-80 v 



8-IH> l- 



Kid Tricks. 

The number of petty Hulls which 
have taken place on the campus of late 
is very noticeable. Articles varying 
from neckties to sums of money are 
constanlly missing. The college ad- 
ministration has taken steps to put an 
end to this. Without doubt, the male- 
factors will be discovered and their 
depredations cease. 

But there are some stunts which dis- 
tinctly bear the earmarks of an under- 
graduate stunt. Stealing icecream 
and other eatables from the short- 
course socials has seemingly (TOWS to 
be a custom. D<> not let it happen 
again. Aggie men are supposedly hon- 
or men, witness the success of the honor 
system. "Swiping", it only in fun. Is 
not honorable, ami lays the one who 
"swipes" open to criminal charges. 
Incidentally, the whole atVair smacks 
of the small boy. To those who were 
involved in this year's pranks, and 
others that have preceded it. we can 
but say, "(Jrow up, be honorable men." 



cS-IKI I'. 

ti -10 v 

7-4») a 

7-00 i- 



1-10 i- 

7 4.-. P, 
K-00 P. 



Wkd.nksday, Jan. 19. 
. m.— Hockey, Harvard vs. M.A. 
C, Boston Arena. 
Kuin.vv, Jan. 21. 

. M.— Chapel. 

. m. Interclass basketball 

games, Drill Hall. .Juniors 

vs. Seniors, Freshmen vs. 

Two-year. 

Hotkey, M. 1. I. !vs. M. A. 

C, at Boston. 
M.— Baske;ball, Vermont vs.M. 

A. C at Burlington. Fresh- 
men vs. Hartford 1 1 i sjt li School 
at Hartford. 

s\n i:i.ay, .Ian. •■!■■!■ 

Hockey. Tufts vs. M. A. 0, 

at Boston. 
m. Social I'nion F.ntertain- 

ment. Slockbridge Hall. Mr. 

B. F.Ford, Fleet rical Scientist. 
M.— Basketball, Middlebniv vs. 

M. A. C. at Middleliury. 
Simiav, Jan. B. 
m. Sunday Chapel, Dr. Albert 
Parker Fitch. A m li ■ rs t 
College. 

Monkay, Jan. 24. 
m. Chapel. 

Tt ksday, Jan. 25. 
B.— (ilee Club rehearsal, Room 
114. Stockbridge. 
Football practice. Drill Hall. 
Pomology Club meeting, 
Boom ol2. Stockbridge. 
\Vki>nksi)\y, Jan. 2r>. 
m.— Assembly, l'rof. Job 8 l'he- 

lan. M. A. C. 
m.— Animal Husbamlry Club, 

Stockhridge Hall. 
M.— Basketball. Harvard vs. M 
\. ('. at CambTtdgO, Fresh- 
men vs. Cushing Academy at 
Ashburnham. 



basis. It is assumed that every boy In 
the slate taking agricultural work in 
the schools has a definite interest sJoSf 
some agricultural line. Maybe the boy 
is raising a few chickens, or has a small 
plot of potatoes. It is the teacher's 
work to increase his production and Ids 
percentage profits. In order to be alii. 
to do this most efficiently, every 
teacher of agriculture in the state is 
required to keep himself familiarized 
with modern agriculture by doing ■ 
certain amount of self improvement 
work each year. The work that each 
man does is supervised and accepted by 
l'rof. W. S. Welles of t tie Department of 
Agricultural Education, and Mr. A. F. 
Ileald, Stale Supervisor of Agricultural 
Education. 




ALBERT B. BIAS 

< ATKKINt; roa 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At KI'.ATKItMTIKH KVKKV NMJHT 

J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing end Printing 

Mills Studio Phone 456-R 



Conn. General 
Life Ins. Co. 

of 
ilMiTFouh. CONNECTICUT 

placed over $100,000 INSUR- 
ANCE on M. A. C Students in 
1919-1920 



Because we pick the flower of the 
season's patterns before the woolen 
mills offer their lines in the open 
market — 

Because every fancy mixture we 
select for college men's suits is con 
fined exclusively to us — 

Our suits and overcoats appeal to 
college men who want something out 
of the ordinary. 

Kverything they wear. 

Rookrs Pkrt Company 



OVER THREE-FOURTHS M, A. G. 
STAFF 

have insured with this company. 



You can carry $5000 converti- 
ble Life Insurance for 10 years 
at a quarterly cost of $11.00 

(a or jo) 



Broadway 
at 13th St 

Broadway 
at Warren 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 



Broadway 
at 34th St. 



Fifth Ave. 
at 4lst St. 



NEW YORK CITY 



Full information on plantum; 
your insurance for the present 
and future gladly furnished. 



H. E. ROBBINS 

Amherst, Mass. Tel. 442- 1\ 



We, Too, "Have No Abiding Place". 
They are looking for endowments up 

at McHill University. Stephen Lea- 
cock, noted bumoiist. is a professor 
there, and he himself wrote the appeal 
for dormitories, lie said that when he 
wasastutlent at MctJill he lived in no 
less than 17 boarding houses, all of 
which are still in operation. Then be 
added that if he were to build a college, 
first he would have a smoking room. 
then dormitories, and later on. if there 
was any money left, a (HOfSBSOf or two. 

It seems to us that Aggie men should 
sympathize strongly with Mr. Leacock. 
Y'ear after year offices are gnawing 
their way iuto South, until now he who 
would take a shower must wait until 
6 o'clock or "pussyfoot" cautiously 
down past the offices to the basement. 
North is entirely inadequate. We get 
together, more or less, to eat, but there- 
after scatter to rooms, some of which 
are miles from the campus. 

Dormitory lifeisoneof the most im- 
portant things in a college mans career. 
It gives him contact with his fellows, 



TEACHING INSTITUTE 

AT SUMMER SCHOOL 

The second annual Institute for the 
Improvement of Agricultural Teaching 
will be held at M. A . C during July. 
The Institute is a cooperative effort 
under the joint direction of the Division 
of Vocational Education in the State 
Department of Education, and the De- 
partment of Agricultural Education of 
If. A.C. Its aim is the 'improvement 
of agricultural teaching, leacher-train- 
ing,and the supervision of agricultural 
teaching. The Institute is open to di- 
rectors, supervisors, teacher-trainers, 
teachers in service, and candidates for 
teaching agriculture and allied subjects. 
The instructors and lecturers in the In 
stitute are chosen from the best avail- 
able talent in the country. The study 
of special problems by individuals is a 
prominent feature of the work. Credit 
towards the degree of Master of Science 
is allowed to such members of the In- 
stituie as are eligible to the Graduate 
School of the College. 

The Institute is run in connection 
with the personal improvement project. 
This project is run on a production 



NOTICE! 

\re you thinking of taking out the following Magazines for this year: 

The Ladles' Home Journal - The Saturday Evening Post - The Country Gentleman 

If so I would like to get your ordei-I am a student at Aggie. Write 
me a card and I will be pleased to call ami see you. 

LEON L. CLARK, 21 Northampton Koad, Anient 




MASK 



AW 1 ) C Pipe is the btjToest value that the World's 
Largest Pipe Manufacturers can put into a pipe. The 
W I) C is a good, satisfying smoke, and bound to break in 
swett and mellow every time. Highest quality of bit, band 
and bowl; craftsmanship of the highest oreef — that's what 
we mean by biggest value. Ask any good dealer. 

WM. DEMUTH 8t CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLD'S LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 




"En Ir or Not In iBr" 

/JTIIK idea of a "sale" is utterly opposed to the Walsh idea. The men's wear we 
W carry isn't that kind, hut as Hamlet said- 4 'The time is out of joint." 
For liquidation purposes we are offering our present stock of suits and ov« rcoal* nt 
tremendous reductions. Our loss is your gain. 



ELECTRICAL SCIENTIST 

TO BE HERE JANUARY 22 

B. F. Ford will be Social Union At- 
traction. 

Mi. liiiinell I;. Ford, Kleclrical 
Scleatist, will give an entertainment 

Saturday, Jan. 22 at MO i\ m. in the 
auditorium under the direction of the 
Social I'nion. Mr. Ford is well known 

11 the scicnlitie field throughout the 
I 11. it-. I States, and ha- been called by 

The Bdison of the Platform", 

lie ha- earned Ibis title ihrougli his 
neroaa Invention! which include dis- 
riea la lbs eteetro-ebemieaJ field, 
f.ii example, making crystala iaik.au 
elecirotnagnef Inst rumen) tbal will In* 
ii Irate to the ■viator bis exact location 
ni all limes 1 thereby making ii sale to 
tlv in darkness of (<<». and at the 
present lime, he la perfect Ins a torpedo 
thai can be accurately controlled by 

wireless. These and other interesting 

as well as highly toebnleal demonatra- 
- will be performed on the platform. 

Mi Ford, besides being an i 11 ven I or and 
icienfial ni note, has great popnlsrltj 
mi entertainer ami explains the 
principles snd workings of the mystery 
ni electricity, so the andlenee is not 
mil) entertained but also instructed. 



while .1. Casey was the stai 
Turners Falls live. 

The line-up: 

kkkshmkn 
Kane, Harden, rl 
Ferianii, If 
Barker, e 



.'I the 



1 



KM l: I A I Is 

lsr, .1 Casej 

rg, I) vsn 

c. B. Casey 



W'eaihei wax. liruniicr, i g If. Lakonky 
Hike, llairsion, Ij; ,i, |' :ll k>. Kells 

■ s '• M. A. c. |9M gf; Turnout 

Falls -m. Referee. Uarlaed. 



DR. FITCH TO SPEAK IN 

SUNDAY CHAPEL, JAN. 23 

Dr. Albert Parker Filch, professor of 

rellglooa history at Amherst College la 

to address the students at Sunday 

Cbapal Jan. 2:1. lie is a graduate of 

Harvard I'niversiiy ami I'nion Tbaolog. 

ical Seminary, and he has taken the 

degree Of Doctor of Divinity at both 
Amherst and W ilTams Colleges. Of- 

The Fresi n ployed a practice f - ^ '" lh * Cf »« w «»lkMMl ministry 

_.!.i . . .1 m, he preached from that time 



The Landscape Extension Depart meat, 

revived under the diroctll I Mr. 

Charles K. I'bilbrick, is underlakinu 
actual work in a number of towns 
throughout 1 ha stale. 



gami With Amherst Hiyli School |;isl 



until 1!HM>, when lie became president 



oi the \11dover Theological Seminary. 



Wednesday evening in the Drill Hall 

H.v a belter passing gnme and bv a 

stronger defease, the Prwhmenea.il, ?Z?**!. if *" m " tH ,iU7 ' w """ 

beal .heir „p, ..us with a :'.■■ ■.., „: '" ™LV '" 8 ,,n " rUsx[r:it A "" 

heist College. 

Dr. Filch is the author of several 



The lirst few niiiiiites of p|«j were 

rather slow, Bell her team beln| wanned 
ui>. The Fresh .held iiie lead dur- 
ing the lirst half, Which ended with a 
Kill score in t heir favor. Kane made 

inanv good shots for I be Freshmen, 
while Hike played a good game at 

guard, as well as being a strong follow- 
in man. Fciianli slmt the toiils. Ken- 

aej ttarred rex the i Isltors, 

H'^4 \ Mm |;>| mi. II BCBOOI, 

Kane, rl | u , j ;lI k 

Ferranti. Barrows, 11 rg, K. Brown 

Barker, <• e, Strong, Williams 

MTeatherwss, ra If, Kenaoy 

Hike. It;. rl. .Indue, SttOOg 



books, including "The College Course 
anil the preparation for Fife," "Ucligion 
and the Fnderyraduale," and "Can the 
Church Survive the Cbangtag Order," 



( OV1MENCEMENT DATES 

CHANGED TO JUNE 10-15 



Fiftieth Anniversary Festivities Im- 
possible at Later Date. 

Hie big home-coming of Alumni to 

brate our fiftieth anniversary day, 

Will be held Friday to Wednesday. 

.Mine 10th to 15th. I9i] [| j s hoped 

all alumni can be present on the 

llili. 1^'th. and 13th. Saturday, Sunday, 

and Monday which are the Important 

i u alumni. 

The original dates sel for i he last 

ol June were cbauged to the earlier 

lure mentioned, for ssvsral rea- 

m»na, iiiniint; which was the Iroposalbil- 
I lecuring s varslt] baseball game 

o Ibe later dale, and also the difficulty 

in prep s rl ng lot eummei school, should 

mencemeel be held late la June. 

e and other vital consideraiioiis led 

iinaiiiiiious vole of the Faculty to 

thia cheage. 



1922 TO DEDICATE 

INDEX TO DEAN LEWIS 



rRRSHMAN QUINTET 

ANNEXES TWO GAMES 



Tnm Amherst High and Turners 
Falls. 

Pbe Freshman varsity basketball 
defeated the Turners Falls High 
am Saturday afternoon In the | 

"all by a score of :',2-M. From the 

' game Was In the hands of the 

'• who played a good pessing 

and ■ Ntruiiy defense. At t he 

'•■>■ first half f tiie visiting team 

bewildered, with the Fresh- 

'■ polnta mi t he lead. During 

nderoi the game, the Tnrnera 

im •.lined i,n|\ one point, and 

' • I try. Darker. Kane and 

played best for the Fresh men, 



Class Book Elections Held at Smoker. 

The Junior class held a I ker in the 

Social Union Booma last Wednesday 
evening. 

The annual class fade* elections look 

place at Ibis gathering, end i he follow- 
ing men were elected: Optimist, (i. F. 
White: pessimist. F. A. Lyons; best 

bluffer, B, M. Hodgson; most popular, 
CI*. Clerk: must popular o n ed, Miss 
B. W. Harder; possessor oi tbeaa tb- 

est line. K ('. Kandall: l>est athlete, II. 

L t'ollins; worst grind, Bslpb Bnssell; 
wittiest. (,. A. Cotton; most likely to be 
successful, II. F. Haw: must handsome, 
C II. Thompson : laslesl, M. II. Smith; 
the dude, ll. W. Spring: peppiest, C. F. 
(lark: best darner, F. S. Leonard; most 
sarcastic. J. .1. I.owery; best busi 
ness man, II. F. Haw ; most dignified, 
F. B. Cook: social light. K. N, Holman: 
heel natiired, «'. |{. Vinten : worst rough- 
honaer, J. II. Andrews: woman hater. 
K. A. Barnard; human smokestack, I'. 
I). Walker. 

The class decided to dedicate their 
Iti'lex to Dean Fdward M. Lewis, who 
was also chosen as (lie most popular 

prof es s o r. 

A.S.Tucker was elected class bockej 
mnnsger. 

After the meeting there was music 
ami r efres hments, accompanied by the 

usual pi | es. 



DEAN LEWIS ON 

FAITH AND HONOR 

\ very excellent talk was given in 
Chapel last Friday morning, Jan. 14, 
b> Dean Fdward M. Lewis. He related 
two Incidents which had occurred lo 
him during the vacation just passed. 
One was that of a meeting of an ac- 
Qjualataaee who had been "over there'' 
and because of what he had experi- 
enced in Furope had lost all faith in 
humanity. The Dean e.xhor'ed his 
audience not to lose faith in humanity 
no mailer how roughly their beliefs are 
shaken at limes. He also had seen a 
theatrical drama in which the hero, 
pursued by his enemies is finally killed 
by them, and as he takes his last breath 
he says. "They may lake away my life 
but they can never lake away my badge 
of honor." The Dean then said thai 
whatever happened to Aggie men in 
later life they should never forget their 
"badge of honor." 



S. S. HYDE 

opiioiiiu send #o>wwe»l«ns* 
!> Plemanl Mreet (npeneateat . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully Qeersnteed 



N0VICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done 

Woik called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



Mr. Chester I'ikc. of the class of |OJ0, 

■poke lasi night at the Agricultural 
Economics elob meeting in Wilder Hall 
on "The Wholesale Marketing of Fruit 
and Vegetables." Mr. I'ike is connected 
with the Perkina 
.Springfield, Mass. 



ROISTER D01STERS' BANQUET 

The Rolstef Doisters at a banquet on 
Monday evening in Draper Hall enter- 
tained as their guest Mr. Windsor I'. 
Dagget of New York, a JShakesperian 
reader. All members of the society, 
faculty manager F.I'.Itand, and assistant 
faculty manager <i. M. Campbell, were 
pr e sen t at the bosquet. 0. M. Bog-bole, 
presides! Of the Roteter Doisters, j. re- 
sided as toast muster. Mr. Dagget gave 
many interesting remarks, including 

' iniscences of some of his dramatic 

experiences, aa well as some timely 
criticism of some actors now on the 
American stage. 

At H-H0 the petty adjourned to the 
Social I'niori rooms, where Mr. Dagget 

gnve a reading of "Borneo and Juliet". 

A good-si/.ed audience, composed most- 
ly of members of the faculty and their 
wives, and members of the Koister 
Doisters and invited guests, enjoyed 
the presentation of this well-known 
work of Shakespeare. 



19 Pleasant St. Tel. 9 J 

funnel l> ( nliimlUa (afe. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO X9Z.A 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 
Amherst - . . Hem 



It was voted to use the money raised 
for the hand in order to buy gold foot- 
balls for the members of the team as 
commission house in not enough was collected previously for 
'this purpose. 



Students : Attention ! 

FREE I Beautiful Omlmnmtmrm tor IB21 

Kspeciaiiy ordered f,, r fraternity 
Houses, tall early before 

tOO Lite. 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 



E 

SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 



INFORMAL POSTPONED 

There will b« ■«> informal Uiis week 
•ad. At Hie last week assembly lluie 
was uHtan.l to see how many Intended 

going, but as 75 couples we.v needed 
to make a siieeess, and only nbottl M 
itood, it was temporarily called off. 

Agetnon Friday in the Bjorniaaenapel 

it was asked lhal Ho.se wishing to sup- 
port an informal write their names on a 
pieee of paper to hand in as they paased 
nut. This, however, proved unsuccess- 
ful, as hut lliirty names were handed 
in. It is art known when there will he 
another informal, hut it is said that no 

date* eaa be arranged tor one this term. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



The Junior and Senior flrls gnW ■ 
party to members of their class Friday 
evening, December nth. Ten couples 
■Itendtngnnd amused themselves with 

lively gnmeeof their childhood, includ- 
ing Winkum, Blind Mans Blufl and 

Drop the Uamlkerclrel. The gtrll pie 
pared retrcshments of idiocolate, sand- 
wiches, cake and fndge. Mrs.Uacharach 

obeperoned the party. 

ihe Delta Phi Gnnma BororHj is 

plannintf to uive a Valentine Dance 
Februaiy ISth for t wenty-ein hi couples. 
I'lie "ills an- sparing no clVoits to make 

the affair a m c ce naf nl i • The , "'"- 

miltee in (haryc consists ,,f Both llur- 
,|,., H, hall and dcconilh.ns: ft M 
Fabrovitz "2:5, music. 

l'rofessor Tyler of Amli.ist College 
has been secured by l'rofessor l'arkei 
,,l (he Mathematics Department to 

teach the .curse in Economics 98, which 

isastndv of the ••Fvolution of Civilian- 
lion .'* l'rofessor Tyler has spoken in 
assembly and is well known to many 
students on I lie campus. 

Prem Lnl, an Indian Btodenl la the 

four-y.ar eottma of the College, will 

glVC M illustrated lecture oii'l'ales- 

Um" at the Congregational church a 

week from Sunday. Mr. FaFs talk will 
bt itrengthennd by the relation of bis 

varied ex perienees in l'alestine, Egypt, 
Mesopotamia and Frame. Hi- WM Work- 
ing with the V. M. C. A. la theae 

countries for live years, and was an 

othcial gaide to tioopa In the < l itv ol 

Jerusalem during a part of the war. 
Mr. Lai intends to finish bla COUrtC In 

three \cais been use oi bia advanced 
•tending ohtnlned at i university la 

India. 

On Jan. IS, Lambda CW Alpha 
held a house party at which there were 
lifleen collides. The diaper.. n WM Mis. 
Cameron of lit. IFdyoke College. An 
orchestra of live pieces composed of 
local talent furnislud music foi danc- 
ing. The decoration! were of laurel 

and e vergre e n. 
Kappa Sigma held a very successful 

house dance Saturday Jan. 1".. There 
were eighteen couples present, chaper- 
oned by Mrs. l.adamerof Ml. Ibdyoke 
and Miss | uc of Smith College. Music 
wasfurnished by a local orchestra. A 

bttffet luncheon was served during the 
early part of the evening. 



representative Of the American Jersey 
Cattle Club.a! the next Animal Hus- 
bandry club meeting, Wedueeday, Jan. 
10, in Bowser Auditorium. Moving 

pictures and steicoptican slides will 
serve to make the meeting more inter- 
est in ff. 

The purpose of the club at these bi- 
weekly meetings is to present the van- 
ions phases ol animal husbandry in a 
practical way. stressing the methods 
to the best followed in New Fngland. 
Every one interested in animal hus- 
bandry is invited to attend. 

The Landscape Department has drawn 
up plana for a Hub' garden, which will 

probably be set out ne\l spring in co- 
operation with the Grounds Depart- 
ment, between Wilder Hall and the 
old Stockbridge House. 

The varsity relay team is practicing 
at taking the banks, and passing Ihe 
baton. Men who are showing up well 

to date are captain (.my, Sullivan, Al- 
lan, Hur.i, vTood worth, afacCreadj and 
West. The First meet is to be held la 

Boston, on February 5th, with New 

Hampshire suite. 

The Freshman class held a meeting 
hist Tuesday evening in Chirk Hall. A 

committee waeappolnted to lahe charge 

of the class play as follows: John 
Heed. Norman If UO A fee, James Wil 
liams. Robert Steere, F. Davte, Alfred 
P.SIaebnerof Windham, Connecticut. 
aai elected to the IF.uor Council. 
deal enthusiasm was shown by the 

class "v.r s I original songs and 

cheers by Bairetou. 

The V. M. C A . is to hold a series ol 
discussion groups on America's rela- 
tions with Japan, Chlon, and the Far 

Bast, led by Profeneor Machmer. Theae 

meetings are to beheld every Wednes- 
day night..! lib"., in room S17, Stock- 
bridge Hall. The li'st of the aerie 

tonight. The entire student body i* 

invited. 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 

fffana 
fffafnja 



Shorn 
Repairing 



T. MIENTKAS 
— TKY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for Brat-olaaa 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your -chance to pick 
up some real Bargains in 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SALE! 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing; done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. On row way sf town. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

— DKAi.i:i:s in — 

DRY AND FANCV GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



MIDWINTER ALUMNI DAY 

Continued from page 1 



\t the mass niectiiiu iast Wednesday 
CD. Kendall, president oftheSennte, 

cautioned the students not to violate 

customs at WCehdaj and Sunday chapel. 

There should be no talking at Sunday 

chapels, and there is alto-ether too 
much noise when hymn books are taken 
out ami returned to their places. Svveat- 
ters should not be worn in the auditor- 
ium, and books should not be read at 
chapel e.\ei<is,s. Standing in tin' back 
of the auditorium is not permissible. 

"Jersey Cattle in New England" will 
be discussed by Mr. Tichane, extension 



dated. At 7 o'clock Joha Keedriek 
Bangs will uive an entertainment In 
Stockbridge Hall, which will be fol- 
lowed by a .-on.-, it of the Musical Clubs, 
on Saturday morning at '.> o'clock there 
will be an alumni meeting in Boom 114. 
Stockbridge ball, and at l*>:'.ti there 
will be two meetings held, one for the 

alumni interested in athletics and the 
other for those Interested in non-ath- 
letics. The former will be held In 
Boom 114 Stockbridge, and the latter 
in lb.oin 110. and a discussion of the 
condition affecting both subjects will 
be taken up. In the afternoon there 

will be a hockey game at -i. o'clock with 

Boston College followed at :'. by a bas- 
ketball game With New Hampshire 

state la the Drill Hall. The fraternity 

banquets will be held la the evening 

at 7.:5U. 

The alumni ollice in South College 

will be the central bureau for register- 
ing and securing Ol complimentary 
tickets. 

In connection with the plan for the 
alumni to visit classes Friday Btornlag, 

the Veterinary department will keep 
open house, ami graduates now in 

Chemistry will relate their experiences 
to the chemistry classes oi undergrad- 
uates. Dr. S. H. Haskell "t>4. director 
of the experiment station, will give a 
talk to the Agronomy classes on pro- 
fessional aspects of agr >my, and A. 

\V. Biggins 't»7 will present agronomy 

from the commercial standpoint. Stu- 
dents who majored in Poultry have 
been invited to give brief talks on their 
line of work, and Ihe Pomology depart- 



Sheep Lined Coats from $14.00 up 
Leather Coats from $30.00 to $42.00 

Stylish, well made, comfortable All Wool 
Overcoats In ■ »**»» »*>•' >' ou win like - 

Specially priced from $35.00 to $55.00 
Most of these are 

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX MAKE 

Vou can easily make a few dollars by 
looking these ovtr before you buy. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for over 30 yean 



E. Frank Coc's Fertilizers 



ilea. u. •. pat. orr. 



Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business farmer's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C. Desk 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

suesioiMV or the amcrimn agriculturai chcmicr;. comr.ny 

51 Chambers St., New York City 



COLLEGE 
STORE 



e e • 



men t plans on the ret urn of some *ue- 
eesafnl alumni who will talk on fruit 
graving, it is planned to have a lnict- 
i"K of the M. A. C. Florists' and Gar- 
doners' Cluh arranged bj the Flori- 
culture department and have expert* 
fine talks given i,y some of the mem- 
bers. The depart ineiils of Lands, ape, 
Agricultural Economics and Language 
lad Literature have also arranged pro- 
grams in connection with t heir classes. 



If it's for HAT RENOVATING, 
GLOVE CLEANING or SHOE 
DYEING, CONSULT THE COL- 
LEGE SHOE -SHINE PARLOR 
BY THE AMER. EX. OFFICE. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

C»11»S« Jewtlry— Clin* Links. Soft Collar Tins. 
DrtlS Butt Sett. Violin. lianjo. Mandolin Strings 

Fist Watch ■•pairing', also Broken Leasee 

Replaced I'i t.t I > . 

32 Main Street. Amherst. Mass. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



MERIT 

Judged on the merits of itscontrihu- 
llea to human welfare the Dairy Indus- 
try ranks lirst in point of service to 
mankind. 

This service stands or falls upon abil- 
ity to produce milk foods with their nu- 
tritive qualities and delicious flavor* 
unimpaired. 

In like manner the distinctive, sani- 
tary cleanliness which the use of 



provides, constitutes a service which 
lias contributed largely to the blfffa 
standard of quality maintained in the 
field of Dairy Production. 

During the year before us you eaa 
place your orders for this great cleaner 
in full confidence that the quality which 
has given character to this product will 
l>e steadfastly sustained. 

Indian In circle 



It cleans clean. 



In ever; pkg. 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




ACCORDING TO THE LAW OF AVERAGES 

It will be your turn to lose a Fountain Pen soon. Replace it here. We sell standard 
makes at standard prices. Or if the one you DON'T lose is out of order, bring it to 
us for repair. 

DON'T FORGET THAT WE SELL. 'EM 



M. A. C. VS. HARVARD 

Continued from page 1 
team. In Captain BlgeloU and liuntin, 

Harvard lias two oi ihe iirsi oeater men 
in the college ajarae aad she alee lias aa 
eseeptioaallj strong team oa the 
defense. 

The Aggie team at present Is nol In 
the condition it hopes to !>o later i" I lie 
season. It is only during Ihe pasl 10 
days (hat there has been iee eDOttgfa lo 

perm 1 1 practice and tbe team has not 
rel reaeaed its top snide, ah the reg- 
ulars will be in Ihe lineup however and 
the men are confident thai they eaa 
Uive the Crimson a toagB battle. 

While Harvard will probably be I he 

favorite, there are plenty ol Aggie 

backers and it the crimson does win. 

•be will be forced to play her beet. Tbe 

Aggie team showed in the Dartmouth 

name that it was no weakling. Cap- 
tain McCarthy has been playing a line 
Kaaae at tight wing and it is sale to saj 
that he will hold his own w it h any ol 

the crimson men. Tbe Harvard defenst 

has its work cut out to slop him 
tonight. Collins at cover point and 
Mansell al ro\ei are two oilier stars of 
the Aggies who will hear watching. 
The lineup will probably be as follows: 

M. A. < . IIAKVAKI) 

McCarthy, rw Iw, Angici 

Lyons, c e, Itmitin 

llansell, r r, Blgeiow 

Snow or Cordon, lw, rw, Emmons 

< ollins cp, op, < >wens 

Poole, p p, Humphrey 

Newell, g g, Holmes 

On Friday afternoon the Aggie's op- 
ponent will be the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology team. "Tech" lias 
a Strong team, but has been playing in 
hard luck and has lost two games, both 
to strong teams and by a one-point 
margin. She is not as strong as Har- 
vard, but neverl helcss will luiiiish slid 
opposition. M. I. T. has practically a 
team of reteraas, and B strong combi- 
nation built BlOttOd McNeil at center, 
who is a real star. 

This game will be played with six- 
man teams, but this should not put M. 
A. ('. to any disadvantage. Captain 
McCarthy, Lyons and Mansell will 
make a fast forward combination, and 
Collins. I'oole and Newell form a de- 
fenae which both Amherst aud Dart- 
mouth found difficult to penetrate. 
Newell has developed fast since last 
ion and, particularly la the Dart- 
mouth game, made some fine stops. 

The game should he fast and close, 
but from the records thus far Aggie 
seems to have some advantage. 

The last game of the trip will be 
played with t he Tufts team at Medford 
on Saturday afternoon. TheTufts team 
is more or less of an unknown quantity 
but apparently is not nearly as strong 
as either M. I. T. or Harvard. The 
Medford seven lost its first game to the 
Portland Hockey Club and the Aggie 
team is not expecting much trouble in 
winning. 

Snow, captain and center of the Tufts 
group is a brother Of "Johnny"' Snow 
of the Aggie 'earn. 

The Aggie lineup will be the same 
as against Harvard. 

ex-'*20. -Clifton Scott, who has been 
teaching agricultural work in the Ash- 
field higli school, is on the campus on a 
professional improvement project, to 
finish his work for a degree. 



When serving 

HOUSE PARTIES OR LUNCHES 

consult us. If you do not see 
what you want in our display, 
k-11 us and we will make it. 



W. B. DRURY 



io Main Street. 



WRIGLEYS 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 




We eat too fast- we eat 

too much. 
Est less-chew It more. 

WRIGLEYS 

after even* meal- aids 

digestion, cleanses the 

mouth and teeth sod 

sweetens bream. 

costs urtu ssneriTSNuca 
Still 5 C Everywhere 



PLAZA 

Noftaassseoa . Ma*a. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

a/fears tba n«*»t 

PHOTO-PLAY 



• • • 

A re show n. 

Program changed daily except Monday 
• nd Tuesday. 

IKKHK P. BELMONT, Manner. 




Sealed Ticht 
-Kept RuzM 



THE FLAVOR 
LASTS 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



Candy Shop 



Soda Parlor 



BECKM AN'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 

Northampton, Maaaaohummtta 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, lflC. Northampton, Mass. 



An <>iitir;ii shop which maasarai up t<> th<- 
blirbeat standard of modern aarvlcs, Von 
eaa raly on oar skill and good taste in ail 
optical mattsrs. 



<»ui \n l)i'|..utiinMit Is II lie. I with pietaras 
suitable tot the daeoratton <>f "frat" bonsea, 
hi i<m blrthdaj and wim|<Ihik ulfts. Qraattng 
■ arda for particular psopla. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



— 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 19, 1921. 




WE ARE OFFERING FOR YOU 

A drastic reduction on Overcoats and Ready-made Suits. 

This is a rare opportunity for you. 
Our new line of imported Italian Borsalino Hats is ready 

for your inspection. 
A quantity of snappy College Stripe Ties. Just what 

you've been looking for. 



SHORT COURSE NOTES 

T_9 Junior class of the two-year 
ionise gave a "welcome" party to the 
v. inter school students la room 114 
Stockbridgc Hall, last Tuesday night. 
Miss Hamlin ami Miss Skinner were 
patronesses. The evening was spent in 
dancing ami playing old-fashioned 
games. A much enjoyed feature of the 
party was the coin popping in the open 
lire. < ider and crackers were served. 

The Winlei Course students have or- 
ganised tor the coming term. At the 
first meeting of I he Winter Course stu- 
dents held on Friday evening, .Ian. 14, 
I he following officers WON elected: \V. 
A. Casey, president; Miss Josephine 
Samson, vice-president ; B.C. Newton, 
secretary; and J. \. Walker, treasurer. 
An entertainment committee was elect- 
ed, consisting of K. B. Walker, and 
other class otlieers, Mrs. Miller and 
Miss Ward. The following chairmen of 



their several committees were also 
elected: Musical Clubs, I.E.Thomas; 
dramatics, K. 0. Newton ; debating, K.K. 
Bpofford; athletics, C. K. dronberg; and 
Students Council, C. K. Sowerby. 

A dance and party will he held at the 
Drill Hall at 8 o'clock Saturday Bight, 
JlB, 22, by the Senior two-year da — 
The Freshman two-year students and 
the 10 weeksstudents are invited. Whit- 
nmre is in charge of the committee of 
arrangements. Davy* orchestra has 
been obtained. 

The Kolony Klub, at a meeting last 
Friday night in the Griiinell Arena, 
initiated the following new members: 
Alstrom, Kicrstead. Brown, Wilson. 
Harrison, Sutton, and Adams. 

The two-year Glee Club, which has 
become newly organized under the di- 
rection of Mr.Wortbley, has got together 
some very promising material. Twenty- 
live men are out for practice which is 



to be held regularly every Wednesday 
evening 'mm d-HO tolMHlin Koom 114, 
Stockbridge Hall. While it may be 
possible to give a concert on the cam- 
pus just before the junior members 
leave college in March., this year's 
efforts of the club are to be given main- 
ly toward developing and getting into 
shape a strong club for next fall. 

In the program of the Agronomy De- 
partment for Alumni Day, February 
fourth, it is planned to have Directors. 
It. Haskell, '04. and A. W. Higgins, '07. 
talk to the students on " Professional 
and Business Aspects of Soil Fertility 
ami Fertilizers.'* 



THE HOM 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



'IS- -William li. boring, who has been 
teaching in Hopkins Academy, is tak- 
ing short courses in agricultural educa- 
tion and rural engineering as part of 
his professional improvement work. 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

i Give «■ • trial' 



7 






--'/ 



HAT 

Do you put 

I in there?' ' 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



G. H, RUMERY, Electrician 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RU(1S AND CARPETS 

— K. I». MAKSH KSTATK — 



» \ 



FEED, yes. But — 
WHAT KIND bit? 



At the fairs and dairy shows, 
many of the most successful 
dairymen tell us they get more 
dollars' worth of milk out of a 
dollar's worth of Buffalo Corn Gluten Feed, fed mixed with 
wheat bran or millfeed, oats, etc., than any feed they know of. 

Thev probablv never had anybody offer a reason why Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Fked makes milk the way it does. They did not care WHY so much, 
as lon<? as they got the milk. But the very high digestibility, in large meas- 
ure, account* for it. 

See t hat. there is plenty of BUFFALO CORN GLUTEN 
Ff.ed m xture in the feed trough in front of your 
cows— and y u will understand *»*_ Buffalo Corn 
GLUTEN FkV.d is so well thought of on thousands of 
real dairy farms. 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

— AT 

Economy Prices 



E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



t» 



"BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 41.VVV) Hadley. Maai 



FF.FD I'P! Yourrtralrrshould have Buffalo 

Ci.itfn FKED. If he d<K-s n.>t. write us 

for hti rat ure ami .-ample. ^-ivingr u« his name 

;u ft adrin as. 



Cofn Products Refining Co. 

(few York 



MANUFACTURFKSOI' _ThiCA.tfO 



BUFFALO 

CONN 

GLUTEN FEED 




HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, - Mass. 



-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 
JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPOS 

The student gathering place fo» 

the real home cooking ami 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 2b, V)2\ 



No. 12 



MAROON AND WHITE 
QUINTET WINS AND LOSES 

Captain Gowdy's Team Downs Mid- 

dlebury 23-18, but Loses 

to U. V. M. 

Last week-end the varsity basketball 
squad bad one of the most success! ul 
trips that a team from M. A. C. lias 
ever had. They lost to Vermont in a 
bard, clean game by a 21-10 score. Imi 
defeated Middlebury tkl next night. ■_• 
1H. The bucccss of the trip was fur- 
thered by the line treatment given the 
boys in both places. At U. V. M. the 
■.indents were particularly cordial and 
gave the M. A. C. team all the credit in 
the world for the tine exhibition <>l 
play which they put up under the ditli- 
eulties confronting them. The team 
arrived in Burlington only a short time 
before the game was scheduled to slatl. 
Koser's knee was still so bad as to make 
it impossible foi him to play more I baa 
a very few minutes. 

The Vermont game, as written in the 
Burlington Free Pre** ami H ai f a; 

The Vermont basket bah team 
wrested a victory trom the Speed] 
<iuintet from the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College at the I'liiversity gym- 
nasiuin last night by the score 21 to 10 
in what was one of the fastest and most 
exciting exhibitions of basketball ever 
seen on local courts. The visitors were 
easily the best team which Vermont 
has yet confronted, playing a fast paSs- 
ing game which must be nearly invin- 
cible on their own floe*, but the dreen 
and Gold team's success was due to the 
tact that from the very start, and with 
few exceptions to the final seconds of 
the game, they took the aggressive and 
had the M. A. C. hustling to keep the 
Continued on page 2 



AGGIES TO TAKE ON 

F0RDHAM SATURDAY 

Hockey Team to Meet New York's 
Beet ot Ice Palace. Tl 
Game Trip. 

"Primed lull oi dash ami pep, t DO 
agrieuh uralist llasbcd offeiivive and 
detensive strength that opened I be • 
ot tin- Crimson septet. Tbe\ wcicin 
there lighting every minute. BOTOf 
once giving quarter 10 the cm my. 
With their speedy skating and ele\ei 
inside hockey Ike] broke up i 1m Mai v- 
ard offensive drives over and DVOI again. 
and turned tbc tide in the opposite 
direct loO, DOWn near the I Unison 
fool they fought like tigers, ami kept 

"Job" Holmes oo i be q_i rive." 

That's tbc way the Boston Pool rep- 
resentative at Ike Harvard tame felt 
about the Aggie koeke] team one of 

Ike faeteel eepteta vet turned onl 

by M. A. C. And after holding down 
Harvard, who massacred the Dartmouth 
MTOa -41 last week, Aggie stalls out for 
a three-game trip, beginning tblf Sat- 
urday, a trip during which Ibreoof the 
( i, 'o ued or p«_e 7 

DR. FITCH PREACHES 

AT SUNDAY CHAPKL 



DEATH OF MRS. SHORES 

IS SHOCK TO FRIENDS 



Clerk at Dean's Office Succumbs to 
Long IHness. 

The many friends of Mrs. .Mary I. 
>lmres were deeply grieved to beat of 
her death last Friday at her home in 
Amherst. Formally years Mrs. Shores 
has acted as clerk to the Dean, and she 
was always ready and willing to help 
all who came to her for assistance. 
Without a doubt she was the most pop- 
ular and well liked of the clerks on ike 
' ■araptis. Mrs. Shores was 111 most ot 
the last semestar and was forced to be 
absent from her duties on the campus. 
When she returned at the beginning of 
I his term every one was pleased to sec 
her. About a week ago she was forced 

<• take to her bed and had since then 
been seriously ill. IJer death was a 
great shock to her host of friends and 



Impressive Speaker Occupies Sabbath 
Day Platform. 

Dr. Albert Parker Pitch of Amherst 
College delivered an intensely interest- 
ing address at Sunday Chape! .Ian. 28. 
His sermon was an analysis ami discus- 
sion ot the three famous pat aides. The 

Loel Sbeep, Tbe Uoet 0ot», and Tke 

Prodigal Son. Dr. Fitch said that most 
people are portrayed uneonecloosly of 

not in one of these parables, lie said 
that many men and women are like lost 

•keep, making, mistakes t broach Ignor- 
ance and ine.ypeiieiicc. Many young 
people fall into this group because they 
are blind to Ifcelr failings. The eom- 
tnon, petty riOOa of college youths, 
sii.b as gambling and evading of the 
truth are due 'imply to Inexperience. 

In contrast with this gn-up is an- 
other with which the parable ot the 
lost coin deals. It includes the hun- 
dreds of thousands of people who, 
through no fault of their own. Bod 
themselves in a hopeless and wretched 
environment. They are the poor and 
unfortunate lost by tke ruthless indif- 
ference of modern civilization. Tbey 
bave none ol tbe sheltering intiueti 

of the borne, chinch and school which 
college men and women haw. 

Tbe third group, like the prodigal 
son. have deliberately chosen to live 
riotously and sinfully. Tbey have no 
eonaeloueoeaaofgoilt. They care only 
to avoid by some means the coiisc- 
qnenceaof their evil deeds. For such 
people nothing can be done until they 



AGGIE FIVE WILL 

FACE STRONG TL AM. 

HnivuMl \\ ■ 'i.y, M. I. T. Thiira- 

•i iv. and A !.i o ret I v. 

Make Up Bard Week. 

In i In- neat I bl*« days i be . .ii-l J 

qnlntel will play one ol Ike aardei 

sections of i lien scbi'dule : Harvard lo- 
Rigkl al< 'ainbrid-c. I ech 'I'lnilsday nW;hl 
and A to beret on Saturday atlctiioon. 
All three panics away from home and 

airalnei atrong teams is sure t.. i.c ■ teet 

ib.it will try the team k> its utmost. 

The Harvard game will probably be tba 

hardest ol the l bice. Auibcisl has not 
|Ot a team which is up to her MUal 
standard, but it is hard lo pr.pphecy tbe 

outcome of an _e_p5e-A»bveiel game. 

Back team is alwav - at lie beet and full 

oi arrap. 
Harvard is being aoaeked ibis jroer 

l.\ Kd \\ acbter, Jr., a well known and 
btghly d man in basketball 

circles. lie has pioduceda last, (lean 
team which has tared well BO tar, de- 
feating brnkent, Willtama, Tnita. afld- 

dlebury, and t'laik : ami biHingoiil 
Won i-siet and M '. Captain Tol- 

belt is a good detensive man, while 
fills and I'allo have scored at will 

aiiahist some teams, 

H. I I., under Coach ' lluhh Aver, 
will send a fast team against CoMh 

time's i lonTbtrradey night, layer 

Cr.ntinued on p»K» 8 



acquaintances. Delta Phi Gamma Bo- JTJ , r ^^ TO tiilon determine to lead 

rority sent a beautiful floral piece asaj 

, w * . . better lives 

token of the^r esteem. 



AGGIE REVIEW WITH SIX 

SPIRITED ACTS COMING 

Will be Social Union Entertainment 
February 18. 

(In Pride] February IB, at 7-011 r. _. 
there will be stayed in Stockhridge 
Hall an "Aggie lb-view'' wbiih bide 
fair to rival l.toadvvav I nn-st faiuasliial 
production of any I iim ,lu t lire included. 

Inthissiiper production joy will he 
mingled with sorrow, uiastciliil aCtoTa 
bubbling over with humor, pathos and 

emotion ol every description will touch 

the liigii'-sl and deipaal notes in our 
bodli 

This event will be li-altired by six 

ot tke bigbeel class music, drama 
ami comedy Imaginable. The part lei' 

uants will be eacb class, tbe two 
and the faculty, 

To put at ease all questions concern- 
ing the relation ot this event to the 

Freak man Bkovr, it can be said, that the 

Review is not taking the place of the 
"Freshman Show," neiiber is it the 
! "Freshman Show." ll is a production 
under the management of the Koister 
Du'etet Dramatic Society of which the 

ii ma u Skew will be a part . 

For particulars, the class coinniiltees 
OT managers should get in touch with 
('. Iloghoit or d. Bdman as soon as 
bin. 

For further developments watch the 

Co_„_OAN, 



VARSITY SEPTET HOLDS 
CRIMSON TO 2-0 SCORE 

Mansell's Outfit Forces Harvard to 
Limit to Win. 

I'.v r. d. M v< Kivtosii Jl 
The Aggie septet btoke into I be 
vvoildof hockey lam.': when ll held the 
.rack Harvard outfit to a 2 to I) kcotc, at 
the new hosion Arena last Wednesday. 
The game was I he best and fastest seen 
around lloslon tkie year. Fach "AggCl" 
went as be never went before, and a 
brand of hockey was put on that was 
believed incapable ; ii hadihe Crimson 
biillalocd. 

Ilii- SCOTC la Iteeti indicates closeness. 

cspeei.illv with s'lcb opposition, but it 

does not begin to indicate how close the 
game leaHy vv M Ot what a battle took 
place. For two and a half periods the 
•core board remained blank. Try as 
both teams did. attempt*, at englug 
I be pock were futile. Harvard would 
swoop down the Ice in grand style only 
to he rebuffed by our following back 
forwards. Then at. A. (\ would ad- 
vance Tight up to Harvard's defense and 
goal tender, which combination proved 
an iinpctideliable trio and easily saved 
1 he day for I he Crimson. 

(apt. Jerry McCarthy was easily 
bead and siiouldets above anyone on 
Ike ice lie would take the puck time 
and time again right through the Crim- 
son line and down the length of the 
whole surface. It was useless for an v 
Crimson player to chase him. 

New ell's work at goal brought the 
stands to t licit feel several times. Phil 
was certainly brushing them aside in 
that game as well as Wylde, Dave Hui- 
trick Of any one else ever could. The 
tirst score came as a long shol by Owen, 
Harvard's able delense man. Owen got 
the shot away under cover, two men 
being in the way obstructing I'hll's 
view. The second score came five 

minutes later on a shot from a pass 
iiigelow being the fortunate scorer. 
This score was due to our materially 
weakened defense because of Collins 
being off the icr at the lime. 

Cniich Mansell was in rare form 
throughout the conflict. Many times 
he took the rubber from the Cambridg 
lane and reversed tke general direction 
of play. None too little credit can be 
given Sonny for his handling of the 
team. The strategy was perfect and 
had we had only a small share of tbe 
advantages of our opponents, there is 
no question but that M. A. C. would 
have left the Arena with the Crimson's 
wonder team scalped. 

Harvard's great offense was made to 
look of the schoolboy type by our team 
and Sharkey Lyons had most to do with 
this little thing. His speed and agilil) 
togetkef with that of the others made 
the Harvard stars look ordinary. Hub 
her Collins was not only there with a 
sterling brand of defense, hut took a 
band in peppering "Jabs" Holmes as 



> 
o 
r 

1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 26, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 26, 1921. 



well. Hub could take the puck down 
at will. He (tot several pretty shots 
and bad "Jabs" been winking at the 
time they would have counted. 

One of our best shots of the eveniriR 
was from Poole's stick. Pooly dribbled 
down the ice and let them have it long 
and from the extreme left. The rubber 
rolled with bullet like speed, met ever- 
ready Holmes' skates and bounded 
straight up. BTo one in the Arena 
knows why it did not cane, even the 
MOM board man was about to chalk it 
up. Snow and Qotdoa alternated at 
left wiag and were by no means out of 
the calihre of the rest of the " Ajo,'etB". 
They «ot home pretty shots and the 
Crimson did not g«l far along their 
hoards. 

Haybhakino the Chimson? 
II Sl;v and M. A. C. 

Kim is, rw rw, McCarthy 

Bigelow, w re, Lyons 

BuoUn, Spelling, lc le, ■•■J* 611 

Hiii-un, AogUr, lw lw, Snow (iordon 

Humphrey, ep c Pi Collins 

Owen, p * P.*"*" 

HolBM.g g, Newell 

First period— no score. 

Second period— uo score. 

Third Period — 

1. Owen, Harvard 1 :4 

2. Bigelow, Harvard H:,MI 
Score- Harvard 2. Penalties: Snell- 

ing, 2 mill., tripping; Humphrey, 2 
miu., tripping; Collins,2 min., tripping. 
Heferees— lloque and Oaw. Time- 
three 12 min. periods. 

HAYSEEDS 
The Arena hockeyists conceded the 
game to have been the fastest this 
HUM, and the best seen in Boston 
since the days of Hobey Baker. 



WEEK-END BASKETBALL 

Continued f.rom page 1 



Six to nothing in favor of Harvard 
was the best the fans rated ub. At least 
ten goals by Harvard was the general 
sentiment. 



Boston Glohe and others rated Mc- 
Carthy as the best wiug man seen in 
Boston this year, barring none. 



Bigelow the Crimson's starring cap- 
tain, looked like an ordinary player 
with McCarthy, Mausell, and LyonB on 
the ice. 



The student body sure got their 
money's worth, all three of them. 



Many former Agt{ie players attended. 
Bud and Dinnie Uoss, "Gaiik" Plaisted, 
Jack Hutchinson, Dave Buttrick, Jack 
Delahunt, Redding, and others. There 
was a big turnout of alumni. 



It. L. Disler, Manager of the New 
York Ice Pnlnon, was an onlooker at the 
game. He was so favorably impressed 
that he iinmediatly booked our team to 
play in his rink this Saturday. 

HOP COMMITTEE 

ELECTS OFFICERS 

Beginning early in order to get a good 
start on what is hoped to be the biggest 
and most successful Soph-Senior Hop in 
Aggie history, t he Soph-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee has elected Richmond Sargent 
of Buxton, Me., their chairman. Sar- 
gent has been prominent in class and 
college atVairs during the comparatively 
Bhort time he has been here. He is one 
of the few men who have earned their 
football letters in the Sophomore year. 
As a Freshman he played on the foot- 
ball, basketball, and baseball teams. 
He is claimed by the Kappa Sigma fra- 
ternity. Starr M. King, Pittsfield, and 
C. Donald Kendall, Worcester, were 
chosen to represent the Seniors on the 
committee. 



points from rolling up against them in 
an overwhelming tide. 

Capl. Gowdy, the leader and captain 
of the five lanky visitors, played a hard 
game, and was in almost every 
scramble, while Heidger, Vermont's 
fleet captain, was in his best form. With 
unerring eye, he caged five good 
baskets 

As the game opened, it became evi- 
dent that Vermont would have to 
hustle for a victory, for the snappy pass 
work of the visitors kept the ball in a! 
most continuous play. Both teams hit 
sn.li a hot pace that there was no 
chance for free basket shooting. At 
the end of the half, the score stood 
seven to three in favor of the home 
team. Vermont had three floor baskets 
and a foul to her credit ; the visitors 
scored from three fouls. The second 
half opened with a quick basket by If. 
A. C. from an uninterrupted formation. 
In a few seconds Stevens came back for 
Vermont with a clean basket, and from 
then on, Vermont increased her lead, 
with Heidger always in the van. 

\ 1.KMONT (21) M. A. C. (10) 

Heidger, Capt.,lg rf, Ball 

Marr, rg W, Smith 

Kiny ,. c, Marshnian 

Harris, If rg, Thompson 

Stevens, rf lg, Gowdy, Capt. 

Reieree — Linnehan; umpire — Ash- 
land; scorer— Me.Mahou; substitutes 
first half — Poirier for Harris; second 
half— Granger for Marr, Hale for Thomp- 
son, Thompson for Smith, Poirer for 
Stevens, Mills for King, Beals let 
Thompson; baskets from the floor, 
Harris 1, Stevens 3, Heidger 5, Smith 1, 
Marshnian 1, Thompson 1 ; free throws, 
Harris 3, Marshman 3, Ball 1; final 
score, 21 to 10; time, two 20-minule 
periods. 

M. A. C. 23 MlDDI.KHl thy 18. 
Saturday night the second game of 
the trip was played on the Middlebury 
floor. The Aggie team was a different 
team from that which took the floor the 
night before against Vermont. A good 
night's Bleep and time in Middlebury 
before the game, had put the men in 
fine trim, and the defensive and passing 
game which they showed the Middle- 
bury student body was as fine as has 
been seen on their court before. Sev- 
eral Eastern papers remarked on the 
fine team work of the M. A. C. quintet. 
Ball and Smith were the individual 
stars of the game and Marshmau was. 
as usual, all over the court, never for 
a minute out of the play. Capt. Gow- 
dy's work on the defense was up to the 
usual high grade. Roser got a chance 
to play in the last five minutes and 
showed that his lay-off had done him 
no harm when he scored the laBt two 
foul Bbots of the game. 

It was not more than five seconds 
from the blowing of the whistle that 
Smith took the ball in a perfect forma- 
tion and caged the first basket of the 
game. That won the game for Aggie. 
From then on the home team did not 
have a chance to catch the fast Bay- 
Slaters. The second score by M. A. C. 
was a basket from the floor by Ball. 
He followed this shot by scoring two 
fouls in succession. After a few min- 
utes of fast play "Wizard'" Smith shot 
down the sideline again and before his 
opponents knew that he had left the 
crowd he had scored his second basket. 
Ball caged two more fouls before the 
half ended. 

In the second half Marshman leaned 
over the heads of his opponents and 
dropped in his contribution to the eve- 



ning's Bcore. "Red" Ball dropped in 
five more fouls during the second half 
and then went out to give Roser a 
chance to score the last two. Smith 
refused to be outdone by anyone so, to 
prove that be really got thoBe two 
beauts in the first half he safely eluded 
the Middlebury defense and scored his 
third basket from the floor. 

Leonard, Middlebnrys light back, 
was the high scorer for the home team. 
He accounted for 12 of his team's 
points, 10 of these being baskets from 
fouls. Although Thompson did not 
score he played a good defensive game j 
and was a big cog in the Aggie forma- 
tion. The score : 

M. A. 0, MIIUH.KIH Bl . 

Smith, If lg, lacy 

Bell, rf rg, Leonard 

Marshman. a c, lumberman 

Roser, rf (Capt) If, Heath 

Thompson, rl> If, Hardy 

Gowdy, lb (Capt) rf, Davis 

M. A. C, 2:5, Middlcbiir.y 1*. Baskets 
from floor-Smith H. Ball 1. Marshman 
2, Davis 2, Leonard 1. and Heath 1. 
Fouls- Rail 0, Roser 2, Leonard 10. 
Referee— Obri u. Timer- Klinn. 



captain "Hank". He certainly is a 

gentleman." said oBrieu. 

Everywhere the team went tbey beard 
» good Word for the football team ami 
its bunch of loyal rooters last fall. 

The hospitality shown the team in 
Middlebuiy was excellent and the M 
A. 0. management wishes to make 
public acknowledgement of their appre- 

1 ""The Addison Hotel- at Middlebim 
s;.y> it is I pleasure to have an M. A. < 
lean, stop there. Tbcv say we have I 
line reputation in Vermont. 

A- "Bed Hull" leaves the Boor:' Pool 

fellow he has both shoulders dlslo 

cated." 

"That skinny guy (\1) is the la 
man I ever saw. He makes his man 
look like a monkey." 

As grei sweaters come oil and *tripe<i 
j.-iscvs appear: "(Ice, jail buds'. 

"Hank- tested the "call to bell-boy^ 
system' - at the sbciwood, thoroughly. 

Smith's love 'or strawberry shortcak. 
called forth a suggestion lor two gam.- 
win. the Brandon II. S.girlsoi. the Ml 
Vermont trip. 

Margie has been changed to Ob 
Gee." 



SIDELINE BASKETS. 

Louis HaslingsTO limed for the Aggie 
management at the Vermont game. 

L. Smith '14, Fogg '10 and Bacon '20 
were loyal rooters at the games. 

• apt, Heidger of Vermont says, "The 
cleanest bunch lever played against." 

Prof. Donahue, Vermont Athletic 
Com. says, "The Aggies certainly have 
got a clean cut team there." 

Referee O'Brien at Middlebury com- 
ments on the clean passing and play ot 
the team and particularly mentions the 



Miss Kaiherine Middleton, librarian 
of the upstairs reading room of the lib- 
rary, is ill with scarlet fever. She is be 
ing cared for at Dickinson Hospital at 
Northampton. 



If Us for HAT RENOVATING, 
GLOVE CLEANING or SHOL 
DYEING, CONSULT THE COL- 
LEGE SHOE -SHINE PARLOR 
BY THE AMER. EX. OFFICE. 



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AGGIE INN Open from 7-00 to ll-OO 



SENIOR AND TWO YEAR 

FIVES ARE ON TOP 



•m MOM 

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rf. Lent 

Sc.n-- 2\. 1.".; 



Former Defeat Juniors by One Point 
in Interclats Series. 

The Senior and Junior class basket- 
ball 'fains pla.vi'il a spirited, serappj 

uaini' Friday Big 111 at the Drill Hall, in 
which the Seniors managed to nose out 

■ lie point ahead of (heir Opponents 
with a score of 15-14. The entire game 
was hard fought, and neither team was 
the winner until the linal whistle. To 
liegil) With, the Juniors ran tip a score 

• I 7 points, hut '21 soon got si. tried 
with 4 foals and a basket , all catred hy 

Utnstronu. Hooper and Wentsch "22 
made two more baskets in i|itick succes- 
bioii. and '21 ayain caught up, making 
the SSOfSj at the end of the lirsi halt 

11-11. 

The flrSI part of the next peri. id was 

I deadlock, with tinhl defense OS both 

BSi This WSS broken by Armstrong 

'21, followed quick!} by Ktaskei '22. 

\ luiil placed the Junior* ahead, bu! 
with about tVO minutes of plav Davis 

'21 broke through and eaged tbs win- 
ning shot. lie also showed good de- 

' work throne boat the gene, while 

Hooper and Randall starred for '22. The 

lineup: 

•li EffOHS 

Hooper, rf 

Webber, Wentsch, It 

Randall, e 

ker, rg 
•lark, lg 

Referee — Grayson. 
14. 

Ilie Kreshinan-2-yeareonie.-u was rath 
BUMS one-sided affair, especially in 
'In- last half of the name. The uneven 

score was largely a result of poor lean* 

ll and lack of systematic passing OB 

the pari of the yoarllags. The scoring 

ot the 2-years in the first half was 
mostly from fouls, Stevens sbootlag 7 
lot his team. In the second period the 
u forwards y.ot started on a ram- 
page down the floor, and ran up a total 
ofSOpoiotS for the balf. Brunner '24 
red good work, while Guilford '24 
did most of the scoring for his team 
The lineup: 

- 1 1 At: Fur sum k\ 

'• raid, rf ltr, Bran net 

• ens, If rg. Sime, Whitman 

•lie, c c, Kill 

brant, r»i If, Merrick 

\<iair. Clongb, lg rf, Guilford 

tee — I'rof. Hicks. Score— 2 
11 : '24, 12. 

DISCUSSION GROUPS 

STARTED BY Y. M. C. A. 

'Mi Wednesday, Jan. 19, the Y. ftf. C. 

l started a series of discussion groups, 

. VsslstSBt Dean Machuier. These 

isstoat are on international tela- 

> tween countries of the Far Bas! 

the doited States. The first meet- 

proved both interesting and lest rec- 
ti is planned to hold these dis- 
til regularly every Wednesday 
ii '5-45 p. m., at Stockbridge If all. 
Bseetlagi are excellent for broad- 
nes knowledge of the world, and 
ne open to all. 



'uiing one day in the severe cold 
ast week there were 33 fons of 
>al consumed at the Power Plant. 



PRESIDENT DISCUSSES 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLIES 

The theory of Wednesday assemblies 
was presented to the student body at 
Monday chapel by President ISuttcrlield. 
Numerous complaints from uppei class- 
men have reached 1'iew's ears, among 
which are lack of attention, reading of 
papers, naps, the large number of lac 
ulty speakers, and the advisability of 

Iraoaferrlngjassembllsi to Saadaj morn- 
ing. These assemblies werestsrted 14 

yean SgO SBd their purpose has been to 
bring the man with ideas before the 

college. No n S] lias been offered 

the prospective speakers during this 
time, a memo being the OBlj coiiiiii iini- 

cation and the desire to help a group of 

college men the only compensation. 

Usoallj the Sunday speakers have 
been clergymen and on Wednesday the 
business man bas appeared with an 
entirely dillereiit theme. This inaki'h 
it inadvisable to transfei .i--, mbl\ to 
Sunday. Several ideas on assemblies 
were brought out by last year's Seniors 
on their final i|iieslionaires. It WSS sug- 
gested that a Fold Hall forum be held 
once a term, and also an A del pb la forum 
wit li 10 minutes for a Senate mass meet- 
ing at the end ol each i - - . 1 1 1 1 » 1 \ . In 

regard to criticism of faculty speakers 

the president explained that the lea- 
soii lor their appearance was to make 
clear the problems ol the college. 

The Alumni always speak of assem- 
blies' as one of the best starts of tbeh 

education llowevel, ll students wish 
to dispense with them, theie are two 
ways ol doing so, by rOOghhoUSe tactics 

and by petition. Bough boose is ool the 
Aggie method. The right of having 
inblies bas never before been seri- 
ously quest'ooed, but if they are BO 
longer useful then i:ive them up. If 
we keep them, we should act accord- 
ingly. 



AMHERST AND AGGIE 

WILL COOPERATE 



Two Committees Plan to Help Farh 
Other in Various Commence- 
ment Matters. 

The Centennial Committee ol Am- 
herst College and the Semi-centennial 
Committee of M. A. C. held ■ Joint 
meeting on Monday. Jan. 24. For the 
Brat lime in several year* Aggie com- 
mencement will, this year, precede thai 

of A tnhersl, and plans were discussed 
at the meeting, relative to both institu- 
tions coo pent I eg la various asattei 
teudanf upon I be unusually important 
commencement programs planned in 
each. With regard to rooming faei III 
at Amherst's commencement, it was 

ranged to have the Aggie fraternity 
boOSeS put at the disposal ot I be ( en- 
tennial Committee. Abigail Adams 
Hall will be open for their use, as well 
as North and South Colleges, it the lat- 
ter rooming quarters are required. In 
maoy other commencement matters the 
two colleges will work together aleo. 

A Meeting ot restitutions Stewards, 
Superintendents and Head Farmers was 
held on CampUS Tuesday ami Wednes- 
day of last week. The program consisted 
of lectures along professional improve- 
ment lines. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

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Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



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Clot lies sponged and pressed by 
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Come and open an aeeoiinl with me. 
Phone S02-W 

11 Amity St., Amherst, Most, 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Uanquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC.. South Deerfield. Mass. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



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The Masssachuaetts Collegia d, Wednesday, Januaiy 26, 1921. 



The Maa—chuaette ColJegiao, Wednesday, January 26, 1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the ItansaolinsettS Ag- 
ricultural College. 

HOARD OF KD1TOUS. 



Aw a disci |diiiitry nicasuic, Mic Aiei.u 
Part) is a failure, a»d it is only an in- 
eenlhe to in. He and worse Arena Par- 
Lies. Would not a little more bard 
labor for the Freshman, under Ibe 
leadership of Prof. Hicks <.r the 
(.num. Is Department lie a little more 
effective f Or must we liave oiu little 
amusements, like old Nei.r.' 



LAIHKX K 1'. M.MtllN fl, KMll.ir tlH lllff 

R.iHKKT I.. JONK* *t Mai.aifh.U K.litin 

ASStM'IATK Kdiioks. 

OrollOK W. KllMAN '21 

KKN.NKTH A. IUKNAKD "£! 
RT A If LBV W. Itltom.ia "SJ 

I'Aii, L. Bumrert tl 

H-iKAitr w. laaiaa W 

IlKI.IM.Ni; K. JACKSO* 'Tl 

JOBS M. Willi ii kh IB 
I,. It. A.IWIKOTO* ".'.S 



HlJSINKSB DkI'AKTMI.NT. 

Hkhiikki I.. Hkkii 91, Itiminess Manager 

BVBKBX? C.lMtKsi'.N fl adTertWiia Manager 

Chaki.ks A. Bi.k "M Clrruhiti.-ii Manager 

My it. in <}• MiniiAV "/•-' 

HolllfN WllUTAhKi: .'•! 

IIWKN K. Kol.SOM tl 



Subscription *2.iH> per year. Single 
copies, 1<» oentR. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In cane of change of address, sab- 
ioriberH will please notify the l.usiness 
manager a« soon as possible. 

Entered as second elan* mattei at the Mnlietst 
Poit Oftlce. Accepter! for uiallim: at spe. • al 
rate of postage prm i.le.l for In MsHm 110.H, Act 
of October. 1917 autlioitzeit AiiKiist 20, 1V18. 



As a Matter of Courtesy. 
There lias been of late a tendeaey 
anion- siuilents to fail I o give proper 
reapeel to the ipaakan at aeserablr. 

Musi .. I tlie speakers are ni. n who are 
pr.iininent aloiiK certain lines ami it is 
the next Ihlnn to an insult to Meat then 
as thnagb it were their lirsi attempt al 
•peak log in public. Surely "roti-jh- 
house" tactics are not worthy of M.A.C 
men even if their interest is not aroused 
liv the speaker. 



COMMUNICATION 



Interfraternity Parces. 

The first real interfraternii v .lame. 
as neb, was held Saturday when three 
fraternities combined at the Phi Bjbjma 
Kappa house. The affair was a success 
from every viewpoint. l.aek of atle- 
quate facilities at the Drill hall un- 
doubtedly led to the failuieof I he p to- 
proposed infoitnal. If the studenl bodj 
has arrived a» the point where it will 
not support a college dance uiuler Drill 
Hall eonilitions.a remedy tntist he found. 
A new floor in the Drill hall and a ECU' 
eral renovation ol the Appointments 
would help. The new Memorial liuild- 
itiK hall does not promise relief except 
for the smaller gathering*. Hut with 
the renovation of the Drill hall an im- 
possibility, the interfraternity house 
dance is due to boom. 

Why not have a schedule of ini.itra- 
temily house dances with al) I'rsiterni- 
ties participating 1 



Enter, Mr. Nerol 

•'Whither sjoest ihott, tonight, 
Marcus ".'" 

"I? Oh, I k>> to (be Arena, to >ee the 
lowly Frosh grovel in IBS sawdust." 

This will soon be noised about the 
campus again, now that the Pond is 
frozen over, and outdoor atnusemenis 
are rather scarce. The question of the 
reasonableness of Arena Parties will 

agala be broaght up by a few, aad the 

majority will answer. Sure, let's have 
'em— what's the harm.' They aren't 
much worse than Fond rallies. 

The harm is right here. Al I'ond- 
Farties, every co-ed can be OB hand and 
gaze to her heart's content. We never 
saw a co-ed at an Arena Party, l'ond- 
Farties are written up in detail for the 
Coi.i-Ktit.vN. We never saw a detailed 
account of an Arena Patty In the Cm. - 
t.KiMAN.or even in the Blade. True, 
nothing very bad lakes place at the 
Arena Parties, yet nothing very elevat- 
ing or helpful to the name of old Aggie 
takes place there, either. The Fresh 
man conies out of the Fond with a grin, 
he conies out from an Arena Patty with 
either contempt for the custom, or a 
resolve to make it worse for the fellows 
next year. 



Exemption from Finals. 
Exemption from finals has long bee« 

a successful incentive to scholarship in 

this Institution. Considerable 1 honoris 

attached to baring one's name Millie 

Itet of the relented ftfnnp whose stand- 
ing is blgfa enough to exempt them 
troin exaariaatloe. Baeatptioa from a 
final or i«.» often glees nae an extra 
da\ oi vaeatloii. During the Baal week 

there is bigb I sure on the student, 

who has three tinals i le day. and 

h. he peraoltted to cut this ■uasber 
down by application through the term, 
is worth an extra effort. 

The need fol some incentive lo schol- 
arsblp is apparent. Fhi Kappa Phi 
is beyond the reach of all but ■ very 
few Students, aad the majority give 11 
but little though! after the lirst term of 
the Soph. ■more sear. There are too 
many whom there is nothing to urge to 

greater endeavor than thai repteeented 

b\ a mark ol sixty-one. The minimum 
of wotk gives I hem an opportunity to 

attend OUr rilnfiltii>niil vies i.ndlhe 

jazz dances. In view of the competi- 
tion of athletics for the students' time, 
it is essential that there be some coun- 
teracting force. For the average stu- 
dent, this need is admirably filled by 

the custom of exemption from tinals. 

A tendency to discard this exemption 
system has recently become apparent 
gmong i he professors, so that in a niim- 
iier of courses, all students lake the 

tinals regardless of standing. The 

siuilents, uracil by the hope ol exemp- 
tion, have usually made efforts lO get 

as average of eighty-five per cent, only 

to Bed at the end of the term that 
then- aie to be no exemptions. Willi 

an Increasing number of pro f e ssor s 
disappointing them, enthusiasm has 
rapidly decreased. The professors who 
do not conform to this e as te rn are de- 
stroying Its stimulating effect, eves la 
the classes of those who regard it. 

IJ. ft. '». 



SENIOR CLASS MEETING 

AND SMOKER HELD 

The Senior Class held a smoker at the 
Social Union Booms. Thursday, .Ian. 10, 
The til -si part of the smoker was de- 
voted to a business meeting. Cooper 
was sleeted elass hockey manager. 

Action was taken on the suggestion 
thai a play committee be appointed. 
Fletcher, Smith and Kdtnan were 
Sleeted. Then followed a fa vorable re- 
port on the financial condition of the 
li)-21 In. lex. 

At this point the meeting was turned 
over lo the chairman of the smoker 
committee, who acted as toastmaster. 
He Introduced Mackintosh, who gave a 
detailed description of the Harvard 

hockey game. ID* lalh was followed 
by a word from Prof . Maehnier on the 
altitude of the faculty toward the Two- 
Year < 'ourse and t he Intention ol keep- 
ing up the standards of the regular 

four-year courses. The smoker broke 
up soon after the re fresh men is were 

served. 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

CATKIMNU FOIt 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At KHATKKM T1K8 KVKRY NKJHT 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men l.oik'lit to lead by Quickest methods. 

Inttulrlem mt Mlllm Studio. 

P.O. liulldllitl. Phone 466-R 

Conn. General 
Life Ins. Co. 

of 

HAitTFonh. ootrNMcttfmr 

placed over $100,000 INSUR- 
ANCE on M. A. C Students in 
1919-1920. 



Last evening at T«tO the (iraduale 
Club met at the home of Professor and 

Mrs. Chamberlain on Mount Pteaaaut. 
Thomas Watson «»t Boston was present 
ami spoke on Fatly Days of the Tele- 
plume. Mr. Watson was associated with 

Alexander Graham Bell, at onetime. 

He bfOUghl with him a model of one of 

the lirst telephones ever used. 



OVER THREE-FOURTHS M.A.C. 

STAFF 

have insured with this company. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC 1H,(K'K, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A.C Met. 

Next Asseirbly, r RIDAY, Jan. 28, at 8 p.m. 

Private lessons b] appointment. 

Tel. 761 Northampton 

LOW PRICES 



You can carry $5000 converti- 
ble Life Insurance for 10 years 
at a quarterly cost of $11.00 
{age to) 



ON 



SilkHosiery 

"Phoenix," $1.10 and $1.95 pr. 
" Gordon," 98c and $2.19 pr. 

All qualities in 

BlacK, White or Cordovan. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



Full information on planning 
your insurance for the present 
a n d fu lure gladly fu rn ished. 



H. E. ROBBINS 

Amherst, Mass. Tel. 442-R 



The ( <n I.I...I an announces the se- 
lection of an all Aggie tool hall team 
for the decade I' mm l'.Mt) to 1990, as 
follows: 

I.. F. K. F. Crayson 17 

L. T. Holmes '20 

I.. <;. Jordan 'Id 

( . - Dole 1.". 

K. <:. Ferry 'M 

li. T.- King "'21 

It. F. it. H. Grajson 'U 
(i. B. (Capt.)— *Pa!mar 'i<< 

I., n. u. Pond '2t» 
u. II. B, -Darling l'i 

F. B.- Weeks TH 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 

Hat. at 3 

Ev«. •<: sii""-< 
6-45. 8-30 

MtlCSi: 

M:.t. I7C, 2?C 
Kve.28c.33c 



Friday 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 

Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Bve. m mes 

6-45.8-30 



2d of the Mu II ART BUPSR- 

PBODUt TIOKB 
Wm. S. Hart ;. nd Hary Thur- 

man in "Sand." in 7 reels. 
Made ;is Mart wanted it- of 
the West M Hart knows it. 
A sensational lean by Mi. 
Hart on his horse from a hiifli 
• liir into the water is featured 
Ihe stinlnir tale of a man. a 
maid. ■ j.into ponj a robber 
band in the ureit Southwest. 
Newt Topics Comedy 
Mutt and Jeff 

Madge Kennedy in "Help 
Yourielf." from the Satur- 
day Evening Post story. 
-Trimmed wttti H s d." by 
Wallace Irwin. The funniest 
satire on idle society ever 
written' 

Scenic reel 
■2-reel HacK Sennett Comedy 

Wallace Reid in "Excnte 
My Dtttt." Hes in auain! 
Offaeatal The speediest tcas- 
oiine romance you ever s.i«. 
"The Kins of the Circus" 
News Comedy 




er 



We like to keep ding-dinging— 

" Your money back any time, 
should anything go wrong." 

Could any policy imply 
standards? 

Styles must be correct. 

Woolens must be all-wool. 

Making must be substantial. 



high 



'Fit" must be a science — our 



fit" 



m> j„„ May Allison in "Held in 

MOnday Trust." from the novel by 
(o-orue Kibbe Turner. 
Pathe Review 
I reel Al St. John Comedy 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



is the result of keeping careful record 
of alterations for over forty years. 

The best of everythlna college men wear 

Rogkrs Pkrt Company 

Broadway Br ?? ( t W ,?,' 

at 13th St. "Four at 84th St 

Convenient 
Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave 

at Warren & 1 41,t 3l 

NEW YORK CITY 






N O 

AT 




'or* 



s&jz; 



HATS THAT KKKF AHEAD! 

CHK Knox IiiIm'I tellw \\\v >*tory oi quality which litis never fai l«-<l to satisfy im«| 
liralify. B. Franklin, the wims»<aidt "The huyer hnfh nee»l of a liuiidrefl 
eyes." Hut two nre Miff it itnt when luiyinji a KNOX hat or anythinik el«e n< 
"THK HOUSE OF WALSH." 



B. F. FORD CONDUCTS 

SERIES OF EXPERIMENTS 



Second Social Union Entertainment 
Given Saturday Evening. 

The seeped of a series .it Boelal Co Ion 
enter! alBseoats was held lael Saturday 

r veal eg. Jaiinaiy 22, in liowkei Audi- 
t.iriiim. Btockbrldae Hall, and eras 
givea i>y Mr. u. F. Perd, Bleeuieal Sei- 
eniisl. He experimented mostly with 
wireless, and said thai I here will soon 
MMBS R lime wiien insleail of cables 

monies, aeton tiie eoaarry to supply 
power, (Hir eities will he litrhted by 
means of invisible waves produced by 

Bseblaee baadreds of miles away. The 
nexi war will prove i he aaeleesaesa ol 
dreadnoagbrs. An electric torpedo 

» I. 'essly Suet rolled by a pilot in an 

plane far ap in the eloadswlllbe 

iibie to sink any forelgq battleship 



atenaelag oar euaet line Mr. Ford said 

that soon after the war was over, he 

hail praetleallv eoeapleted aa laatru* 

meiil which would tell (he aviator e\- 
Setl] where he w as uoinu, anil thus in 
the event of another war. an aeiuplane, 
under cover ol ilaikness. coubl ll\ eboTS 
Ihe enemy foitilicalions ami drop .low n 
explosive*) very elteelively , ami wii hi nil 

tbesllgbteet danger to the eeeapaata. 
This "Cbartograpb" eoaelats "i en eleo* 
troesegoet, which guides s pencil serous 

a map. ami a> the aeroplane, swiftly 
fly leg tbrougb the air. cuts (he io.il; 
nelic lines nl force of lbs eaith, the 
pencil traces ihe none I hai Ihe avialol 
is pursuing. Ml. For.l then spoke ol 
the iinlold harm done lo ihe human 

in i i !• l by the use <>i ihe "ouija" board, 

and said thai mans of mui dims! pi i 

seal lawyers, duetora, ami sialesincn 
hail been menially ruined b) I his tinsel 
enlitlc iusl riimenl. He then eiuleii bis 

excellenl performance by en electric 
"Uood Niyhi" siga, 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

At Sunday Chapel, .Ian. ;{(lth, the 

student body will have the privilege ol 
bearing s former sladenl of M. A. c. 
Reverend Berber! Jadeeu While, of 
llailford, Coniieclicnl. He was horn in 

Leeariaeter, and from imhiuihsis was 
enrolled la eat* eel lege. Datriag ix#l be 

was a siu.leni si Colgate llnlvefatty. 
Then he took a course al Newion 1'ln'o- 
louical lnstilulion. He was soon at ei 
ordained as a Haplisl minisler. In MHI7 
lo' took the degree of Dootorot IMvioily 
at sfesfiBBvllle College in Oregoe. 

Dr. While has had wide . \peiience In 

preaeblag, ami has beea senior el 
eborohes le Illtlnois, vTaehlngtoa. it-.s 

ton. Beverly and llailford, Conm client, 
where he now has chjiiue of I he Hit^-i 
Haplisl Church. 



PAPER CITY ENGRAVING CO., Inc. 



Makers of High-grade Cuts for all 
kinds of Publications. 



On Friday Bight Ihe Y.M.I. \., as- 
sisted bj the College Quartet, gave an 

eiilellaii ill at Sunderland. 






i iiiiiiiiir 
111 






MAIIK 







RADCLIFFE BUILDING 

Phone 700 

Holyoke, Mass. 

S. S. HYDE 

"ixioiiu, eeeaeJ Je»wve>l«r 

1 nessnnt street (upeneiurhv. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

lnlly I ; 11.0. in tee. I 

N0VICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly ami piomply done 
Work Called for and clelivett'd. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



DON'T take a fellow's pipe. Take some other possession. 
Because wrapped up in his pipe is a fellow's peace of 
mind, his relaxation, his contentment. This is more than 
true if it's a W D C Pipe, because then a good smoke is multi- 
plied many times over. Our special seasoning process takes 
care of this by bringing out all the sweetness and mellowness 
of the genuine French briar. Just you go to any good dealer 
and select several good shapes. Put them in your rack. 
Smoke a cool one every time, and you'll be well on your 
way to pipe-happiness. 

WM. DEMUTH 8c CO.. NEW YORK 

world's largest pipe manufacturers 



10 Pleasant St. | e |. 9 J 

formerly < nlnniMa i ,,(,■ 

AMHERSr SHOE REPAIHING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

IVHILI YOU WAI'I 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
IM1 TO 1924 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Amherst 



1 

I'ifi 



Mann 






S 

H 
£ 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



»t-4r» k 

7-4."» I-. 

W-tKI l- 
K-IKI p. 

>WH) l\ 
7-<«» I'. 



7-40 A 
7-:«) P 



M-OI) |- 

:; im> i 



The Maasachuaettg Collegian, Wednesday, January 26^1921. 

Amherst House Shoe Repairing 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 26, 1921. 



it-IO \ 



7 40 \ 
H-tH) P 



7-00 I" 

7-W) P 
7-:to p 



K-<M> p 



•i-04l P 



:;-oo 



Wi iinksday, Jan. IS-. 
II,— T.M.C. V l)iK<iissi.)ii Group 
liMtlBg, Boon 111, Sloek- 
>»r'ult»t?i Hall. 
m. -Animal Btiabendrjl Oloh 
Meeting, Bowkoi Auditorium, 
Stockbridff* Hall. 
m llaskelball, M. A. C. vs. 

Harvard at Catnbridfe. 
M.-llaskHball, M. A. C.,Kr.-sli- 
meii vs. Cnsblnf Academy at 
Aslilmrnliam. 
I'm iishav, .1 vn. 27. 

M.-liasketball. H< A. '• v *- M - 

1. T. at Cainl>rid»«'. 
\i. Uoister D.'ist.T Wcli.-arsal. 
Social Union Rooms. 
Km day, Jan. M. 
m.- Cliapt'l. 
m. [nterelnes basketball 

1024 vs. 19M, "'"I 2> i vs. 1022. 
BATVBOAT, -Ia.n. 20. 
\i. -Hockey, M. A. < '. vs. K..nl- 

h;im at 1<«' I'alacc. V Y. 
m.- Basketball. M. A. C. vs. 

Ainlier^t. 

SiMiAY, Jan. 10, 
.M.-.Sini(la>('liai>cl,Kev.llcil.cit 

J. White, First I5a|>lisl cliiuch. 

liaitinril, Cobb. 
Hon day, •> an. U. 
. m. Cbepel. 
H . Hockey, M. A C. re. M. t. 
T. at Cambridge 
Tr/WBAT, Ki it 1. 

n.—Bolstei poteter Bebeareal 

Social Inioii BOOBW. 

m. Senate sfeetlng.Old Cbepel. 
m. Combined HeetiBfl of Iflor- 
lealtere ami [jaodecepeClabe, 

French Hall. 
M Hockey. M. \ . <'. ». B. «' at 
Bunion. 
\\ m>m -t> \> • Vku. 2. 

M -Hockey, M. A. C.YsJSpring. 

lid. I Y. M. 0. A. College at 

Springfield. 

. B.— AsseinMy. Student Koiuin. 



CLASS OF 1923 SELECTS 

A PLAY COMMITTEE 



Hockey Manager Also Elected at 
Class Meeting. 
A meeting ol I Be 8l'pBOBM»I» class 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

At Wednesday Assembly, Jbb. 10, 

Mi. M. V. Malcolm of New Yolk Cttjf 
nave a very Interesting address on tbe 

Armenian Problem. M r. Maleol in «r,td- 
uatetl from Amherst College »bOBl 14 

jears ago, and litis attained considnr- 

able prominence as a lawyer. lie was 
Introduced by Harry BryalBB, who de- 
plored to the students \inerica's ig- 
norance of Hi" terrible sufferings of bis 

native country. 

Mr. Malcolm stated thai Armenia 
was divided into three parts, previous 
to 1017, held respectively by Uussia, 
Persia, ami Turkey. At that lime it 
had four and a half millions of people, 
ot which over a million have since lieen 
massacred. Armenians, be said, were 
not Asiatics, but were originally a 
European race related to the Swiss and 
theScotch. \rmenia was ihelirsl na- 
tion to accept Christianity. Us Apos- 
tolic Church dale- from WO A. I>. 

The situation of the country, as the 
highway between \> a and Europe, has 

made II ths battleground of other na- 
tions for centiiiies. I'.\ holding back 
Asiatic invaders, part ieiilat 1> the Turks 

from Europe, II has rendered inestim- 
able service. Ever since the country 

WM oonquered bj Turkey in MOO it 
has been seeking to regain its Inde- 

pendence. The late w il M'emed to the 

Armenians their hum sought opportun- 
ity for freedom. Accordingly they re- 
fused as a nation to aid Turkey, but in- 
stead the] ton. ■in valianllv with the 
Allies. This brought upon them the 
Turkish policy ->! systematic annihila- 
tion. A million Umeniaus w ere slaugh- 
tered in .-old bl I by the 'Turks during 

L91S and 1010. 

Kiame and England, in return tor 
the Armenian aid, promised to see that 

(lie country ■• .! i's freedom. 'These 

promises have been forgotten. Arme- 
nia is a rerj rich country, with tasl 

miaeral resources, and tbe powers of 
Europe, in order to be able to exploil 

these natural riches, have by secret 

treaty divided the counuv among tbem- 

seleen. 
•Then- Is bo longer an Armenian 

Problem," said Mr. Myelin in COB- 

elusion. "8he has escaped from 'Turk- 
ish depot ism, srith a lose of one-fourth 
of bet people, only to be seised fore* 
ploitation by the very counlrles which 

she aided in the wat. " 



Shorn 
Repairing 



Shorn 
Shin* 



T. MIENTKAS 

i 
TBY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for lirst-class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

U Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to plotf 
up soBM real BargaiBS in 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles ot shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SALE! 

Alho Expert Shoe Repairing doae by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. On res* vuo ap tosm. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DKALKR8 IN 



DRY AMD FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



was bold last Thursdav evening in 

Clark Hall, following the meeting of 
the Sophomore members of the Bop 

committee. 

liecause of t he subslil tit ion of class 
performaaoes in place of the annual 
Freshman play, the tirst business of 
the meetiBg was to elect a play eom- 
mlttee to arraage tor a elans prodBction 
this year. Last year's committee was 
,,-eleeted because of the creditable 
work it aecomplished, and Rogei 
Friend, who was head of the commit tee 
and wrote the excellent production. 
"Blood Tells," was unanimously re- 
elected chairman. 

Now that hoekey bas been estab- 
lished as an interelass sport, the elec- 
tion of a manager for the team was 
held, and lohfl M. Whittle! was chosen 
manager for thoeosalng season. 

The faculty has decided to allow 
supervised arena parties this winter, 
and Williams, chairman of the Arena 
Party committee, announced that a 
number of Freshmen have already been 
before the Senate and have been SOB- 
fenced to a season in the terrible arena. 
It was voted by tbe class to send a 
letter to Alfred Gay, following his re- 
covery trotn a serious two-months' 
Illness. 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 
The fresh man rarsilj basketball 

team met its lirst defeat of the season 
last Fridav Bvening when ii was beaten 
by the Hartford "high school sqnad in 
Hartford, Cobb., with a score oi 36-12. 
The score at the end of tbe first ball 
was Hartford '•». IBM— 7. Ths game 
was characterised by its fastness of play 

on both sides. 'The excellence ot tbe 
Freshman live was shown by the fact 
that the usual heavy scorers ol t lu- 
ll art ford team were held practically 

scoreless throughout the game. Esch- 
olts of Hartford, who is neuali) depend- 
ed upon for a large share of the scoring, 

was held to a couple of baskets by the 
line work of Like at left guard. Me- 
Derail, Hartford's left forward, eased a 

number of baskets for the high school. 
The Freshmen scored mostly through 
their forwards, Kane and I'eiranti. 
The line-ups : 

II AKTKOHU. 

Kseholtz, rf 
McOermit. D'Enope, it 
afcMtnnigai, Barkus, 
Baron, hteCoj . re. 

Dunn, Bennett, lg 
Referee:- Johnson 



vi. \. c. IBM. 

lg, Like 

ii: . Weai berwai 
c. Barker 

If. F. ■rranti 

rf. Kane 

>eoie Hartford 



CORDUROY RIDING BREECHES, 

While Mercerixed Oxford Soft-collared Shirts, 
Aeroplane Clotli Shirts, best thing in town, 
Best Grade Imported Heather Wool Sox, 



Now $6.00 

Now $3.20 
Now $3.60 
Now $1.25 



Special reductions on Felt Hats, Suits, Over- 
coats, Leather Coats, Sheep-lined Coats, etc. 

This is a good riME and FLACK to stock up. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for 35 years. 



E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers 



MO U. «. PAT. or*. 



Will help you secure "a greater yield from 
every field." 

They have been the business fanner's stan- 
dard for over sixty years and are more progressive 
than ever. 

If you will tell us the crops which you in- 
tend to raise this year we will be glad to send 
you our new books on soils and fertilizers. 

Ask us about our agency proposition. 

Address M. A. C Desk 

The Coc-Mortimcr Company 

S.J» 3 lt).»«» Of THE «-t»IC«M MW) MM CME-ICA. CO«P» — 

51 Chambers St., New York City 




COLLEGE 
STORE 



e e • 



HOCKEY PROSPECTS 

Continued from page 1 

teams In tbe East will he our 
opponents. 

On Saturday, tbe Maroon ami White 
will clash Kticks tor the tirst time in its 
history with Fortlhani. The N'cw York 
ii claims to be the fastest hunch uu 
skates in tbe big metropolis. Little is 
known here of the tease's record this 

,u .but the sons ot l'eter Stuy vesant 
will be given a real chance to prove 
i heir worth. 

Next Monday, Agirie will play the 
postponed came with M. I. T. The 
i. eh ajrjrregailoa Loat a 44 gam« with 

Kings College, and then anot ber, 4-H, 
to lioston College. But in tbe latter 
contest, tbe engineers were ahead in 

SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick I— sundry 
THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



Collet* Jewelry— Cuff Link*. Soft Collar Pins. 
MieetBult Bete. Violin, liaujo. Mandolin Hliiuax 

Fine Watch Repairing, also Broken Leases 

Replaced Promutly. 

32 Main Street, Amherst, Mast. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



MERIT 

Judged on the merits of its contribu- 
tion to human welfare the Dairy Indus- 
try ranks first in point of service to 
mankind. 

i his service stands or falls upon abil- 
ity to produce milk foods with their nu- 
tr'nive qualities and delicious flavors 

iniiiupaired. 

In like manner the distinctive, sani- 
tarj cleanliness which the use of 



C/eaner 



<*n</ C/eanser 



provides, constitutes a service which 
contributed largely to the high 
-ml of quality maintained in the 
of Dairy Production. 

During the year before us you can 

place your orders for this great cleaner 

in full confidence that the quality which 

given character to this product will 

adfastly sustained. 

in circle 



It cleans clean. 



1,1 ' ?err pkg. 

Th e J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




BETTER MARKS WITH LESS TIME- 

The result of handing in typewritten notes and papers. We sell Corona Port- 
able Typewriters for $50.00 cash, or we can net you a used machine at a good price. 
You have long planned to have one, so why not 

TALK IT OVER WITH US? 



high school-2ti. M A. C. 1924-12. 



the second ball, and the lioston team 

hardy managed to sqaeeea out a vic- 
tory. Dan and Neil MacNeil, in center 
and point, and Sickle at goal seem the 
strongest players on the CasabrldgS 
lineup. 

M. A C, and Boston College are all 
set to crack each other's shins on Tues- 
day. After trimming Kates .'. (I and M. 

I. T. 4-8, the Bostonlans ton ofl Dart- 
mouth's seal p laal week to the tune of 
4-o. Lake Urban, at goal and captain 
Hughes at eeatei showed tbetireens 

lot about hockey. The hurt), n, nil, aayg 
that "Curry (roveri was east!) the beat 
man on theotlensive and although only 
shooting one goal hin-dl. was indi- 
rectly connected with all theoth. i II. < 
tallies.'' With all this year's dope lined 
up. and tbe fact that \ • defeated 
lioston ;V4, in two oven i in es. last season, 
il seems sale to conclude that the ice 

down Boston way will be prettj well 

scratched up next Tuesday . 

POULTRY TEAM WINS 

PRIZES AT NEW YORK 

The M. A. C. poultry judging team 
carried away I he hoiioi s at 1 heii recent 
sojourn in New York City. The occa- 
sion was the Intercollegiate I'oiiluy 
.Judging Contest iKasiein Section^, held 

at the Madison Bourn Qnrdea, New 

York, on Thursday hist, .Jan. 20. Aggie 
stood high in the total score, with 
Lincoln as prizewinner in one ell 
The following live stale colleges wcie 

entered In the contest: — New York, 
New Jersey, Connecticut. North Caro- 
lina, ami Massachusetts. Kadi team 
wa- of three men, Aggie being repre- 
sented by Lincoln '21,Hngai '21, and 
A -b forth. Special. In connection with 
the contest there is a cup given by the 
American Society of Investigation and 
Instruction in Poultry Husbandry, this 
cup to be held permanent ly l»y Un- 
learn winning it for three times. Thus 
far, il has been won by Connecticut, 
last year, and by M. A. C this year. 
\- an additional reward, the members 
of ibe winning team each receive gold 

Eversharp pencils. 

The contest t his year was in I wo pal I.-. 
the Utility and tbe Kxbibitioti Clai 
Aggie stood high team in the Utility, 
with Lincoln as high individual in the 
Exhibition, 'lay lor ol Connecticut was 
high total individual, with Lincoln a 
close second. The standings of ths 
teams was as follows (with a possible 
i a of 2400) : 



M. A. C. 


1000 


Conn. 


1043 


\ c. 


1563 


N. Y. 


1400 


N. J. 


1440 



The Q.T. V. fraternity held SSU Cf SSS 
fill bouse dance last Saturday from I In 
1130. Miss Scribnerof Ml. Holyoke 
chaperoned the parly. 20 couples at- 
tended. The house was decorated with 
red. and music was furnished b] Davy i 
orchestra. Supper was served at the 

Davenport at 7 o'clock. 

Manager B. C. Cronlieig reports that 
he has some very good material among 
fifteen men who are [practicing regularly 
for a prospective Winter School Basket 
ball live. IL Kimball is captain. The 
team will be ready for games within a 
few days. 



When serving 

HOUSE PARTIES OR LUNCHES 

consult us. If y*>u do not wtft 
what you wailt in our display, 
tt-ll us and we will make it. 



W. B. DRURY 

10 Main Street. 



wsaai 

E& a pacnass 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



5*' 



Before tbe War 

packets 

During the War! 



5 



<£ s packats 



NOW! 



PLAZA 

Noi llminiiloii . VI.ihh. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Best 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Are Khown. 

Program changed daily e>ce»t Monday 

and Tuesday. 

nUCsVI r. sUELMONT, Ms eager. 



Tbe Flavor Lasts 
So Does the Price! 




Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., 44 Hamp." 



Candy Shoo 



Parlor 



BECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Maamachummttm 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, lilC. Northampton, Mass. 

in optical abop whtak aMaasjres an to the 1) One An i>«M>»rtiii*-nt l» filled with pirturrn 

Iii.'Im-ii standard of modern service, You j; aaltable for tbe decoration of "frat" nooaee, 

can i>i> on oni ■.kill and u„,<,\ nktto la all II or for hlrthday and wfddniK ulfts. Greeting 

optical mattera. |) <:i rds for imrtii-ular |..M»|di-. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 






THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 26, 1921. 




WE ARE OFEERING FOR YOU 

A drastic reduction on Overcoats and Ready-made Suits. This is a 

rare opportunity for you. 
Our new line of imported Italian Borsalino Hats ready for inspection. 
A quantity of College Stripe lies. Just what you've been looking for. 



BASKETBALL PROSPECTS 

Continued from page 1 



is the chief scorer and the all-round 
headliner for Tech. Captain Toiioii is 
also a last man who has shown up well 
in the two games Tech has played to 
date. Brown found little trouble 
with the Cambridge men, hut in the 
games with Khode Island State ami 
Northeastern the Cardinal and Gray 
team led all the way and scored about 

leu points mole than iheir opponents 

were able to muster. 

I/ittle la known of the strength that 

Amherst may be able to show against 

her old rivals OB Saturday nighl. Har 



Amherst five should not give any seri- 
ous opposition to a larger number of 
Aggie tloor baskets Saturday afternoon. 
Snyder, Lee, and Card are doing «be 
most scoring for Amherst. 

The lineups: H. k. C- Smith If, 
BOMV rf, Marshman c. Thompson rg, 
d.wdy If. HAKVAHH— Pallo If, Kilts 
n. T7«oa c, Feiring rb, ami Capt. Tol- 
bert lb. m. i. r. — Capt. Tonon If, Hoyer 
it, Pinkham c, Blood lb, and Hubbard 
rb. vmiii i:st Card If, Hill rf, Lee c, 
Palmer lb, and Snyder rb. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The hockey games scheduled with 
tier old rivals on obi urunj uikui. "«■ * „ii»,i i.„ 

. , , , ., MIT and Tufts were cancelled be- 

vard and Wesleyan both defeated the M. I. i.ani l 



,,« the lack of ice. The Tech 

Sabrinas by large scores. The outcome l -'» ht « «■■ K 

.... .nil, game w be played next Monday at 

Of our game with Harvard will help to k*» ,B "'" i ■> 

compare the strength of the two learns. Cambridge. 

Their teamwork is said to be on a par Dean Lewis spoke before a crowded 

with that of Harvard, but the defence auditorium, at West lloxbury High 

of the Parploaad ITklta ta tbelr weak. School last week. He is doing a great 

est point. Willi the line line of for- deal of speaking in Creater Boston 

wards which represents M. A. C the Schools. 



Prof. W. K. Hart and Prof. W. S. 
Welles attended a conference with 
President Butterfield and other educa- 
tional leaders held last week in Boston 
in regard to rural education. 

The second of the Sunday afternoon 
hikes of the Winter School Students 
took place last Sunday. The party un- 
der the leadership of A. W. Casey, left 
Stockbridge Hall at '2-15 and walked to 
Mt. Lincoln. 

Alfred F. Gay of Groton, class of "2tf, 
andKalphC. Leavitt of Melrose, class 
of It, were discharged from the college 
infirmary last week, and sent to their 
homes, after a long serious attack of 
Typhoid-pneumonia. 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



The Springfield Student quotes the 
following: "Aggies up at Amherst have 
listed some of the strongest teams in 
the Fast for the coming basketball sea- 
son, among them being Harvard, Stev- 
ens, Tufts, and Amherst. 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 

Main and Worthington Streets 

Give ui a trUL 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



STUDENTS 



INCLUDING 



Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors 

We guarantee a minimum earning of $7.00 per day to students who are 
willing to work eight hours a day during vacation. Maximum earning un- 
limited. During vacation 1920, the following men earned as indicated : C. A. 
Fuller of Cornell University, $1948.00 ; Mackey Rackow of Cornell, $1860.00 ; 
E. D. Roth of Cornell, $2010.00; J. B. Trousdale of Cornell, $2255.00 ; R J. 
Deans of Syracuse University, $1874.00; C. H. Smith, University of Penn- 
sylvania, $1736.00; R. A. Lasley of Yale University, $2400.00; Meyer 
Gordon of Yale University, $1380.00. 

Mr. R. A. Lasley of Yale University, wrote us, after finishing his sum- 
mer's work, as follows :-"I wish to express my satisfaction and appreciation 
to the National Map Company for the opportunities they have given me during 
both summers of 1919 and 1920. During this last summer my gross commis- 
sion for three months was slightly over $2,400.00, and my first summer it was 
nearly $1,400.00. I consider that the company has always been square with 
me and their co-operation has always been hearty and effective. I recommend 
this work to any man who wishes to crowd a year's work into three months in 
consideration of a year's pay. The experience gained is worth much." 

When thinking of summer employment, think of the National Map Com- 
pany, with offices as below. Write for particulars, New York Office. 

NATIONAL MAP COMPANY 



HOME OFFICE 
Murphy Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 



EASTERN DEPARTMENT 
119-121 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 



C, H. RUMERY, Electrician 



MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUdS AND CARPETS 

— K. D. MAK8H KSTATJE - 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



-AT- 



Economy Prices 



E. M. 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



««i 



»♦ 



BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Ovr Special!) 

And other good things to est. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel.415-W> Hadlej. Mas* 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, - Ma * 



-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place W 
the real home cooking and 
college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 2, 1921. 



No. 13 



AGGIE QUINTET LOSES 
TO AMHERST 22 TO 21 



A Foul Game from Start to Finish. 
Fourteen for Amherst and Nine- 
teen for M. A. C. 

\ final score of 22-21 tells the story of 
one ot the most hotly contested and 
certainly one of (he most peculiar 
-aines ever played between the old 
,ls, Amherst and M.A.C. Referee 
' .11 land was kept busy all the time 
,-alliiig fouls, first one team and 
then on the other. The game was in 
doubt up to the very last minute when 
i (if whistle blew just alter Poser had 
shot his 19th foul for Aggie. 

The passing of the M A. C. team 
ftgall stood out as the redeeming feat- 
ure of their play. On over 50 occasions 
the Aggie men brought the ball up the 
tloor to within shooting distance of the 
ha^ket, but on all but one occasion the 
shot either fell short or hit the rim ol 
the basket. Gowdy and Marshman 
nied to have especially hard luck 
in trying to cage a Moor basket. On 
wry few occasions did the Amherst 
ii break up the Aggie formation. 
and when they did manage to do it 
ihi) were the ones to lose for the ref- 
eree usually found something to call 
(mil on. Koser invariably responded 
to the invitation by caging one of his 
numerous fouls. 

In the first five minutes of play the 
hearts of Aggie men were satislied for 
I: -cr shot two fouls in succession and 
although they scored no baskets Cowdy 
and Marshman tried several long shots 
which bounded off the rim. They 
would have all counted in an ordinary 
Continued on page 3 



VARSITY QUINTET 

MEETS FAST TEAM 



AGGIE HOCKEY TEAM LOSES 
TO FORDHAM AT NEW YORK 



To Play Stevens in Drill Hall Thurs- 
day Night. 

Some good basketball will be Hashed 
on the Drill Hall siirlace Thuisdav 
night when M. A. C. meeTs Steven's 
Tech of lloboken. N. . I. in t lie annual 
game between the two teams. The 
Stevens quintet has been seen here 
before and nothing need be said of the 
game of basketball thai this team is 
sure to put up, except that this year's 
"Siute" live seems to be (aster than 
ever. 

Coaches Davis anil Harris will send 
an entirely veteran team against I he 
Aggies tomorrow night. Teaming up 
with Captain Kgger. veteran guard ol 
three seasons, are lour fiist sliing men 
possessing from one to three year's 
cxpcreiice. Ol these men. the guards 
alternate at either forward, ami the foi- 
wards at ei(ber guaid. ( aplain Kggci 
has licen starring all season, while 
Kurly, Provost, and Beth have been con- 
sistent stellar performers. Kurty. witli 
his record of 18 mit nf lti(nu!.:i.. 
Princeton, can be depended upon to 
score within the circle consistently 
To data, the lloboken collegians have 



Poor Rink and Penalties Handicap 
Aggies. Score 8 to 3. 

The strong Ford li am hockey team 
•on its fourth victory .at the expense of 
li Mansell's sextet by a score of 8-8. 
Hie Fordham men put up the very best 
'Maud of hockey that ibe M. A. C. team 
hi- ever faced but there were also other 
his which helped to account for the 
defeat. The game was played on the 
Uflsl St. rink which was very small and 
witli a row of four pillars about 20 feel 
from the side. While practice bad 
the New York players expert in 
Iging around these they put Captain 
'art by and his mates at a great dis- 
kotaga, Besides this, five of the 
men were put off the ice at vari- 
perlodt of the game while Fordham 
^d only, one penalty. 
Hie Aggies put up a strong game 
■ad gave the home team their hardest 
battle of the season but under the ban- 
Continued on pege I 



d n 

Hi 



rev. h. j. white INTO- AGGIE FIVE BREAKS 

PRETS GOD'S VARIED GRACES £y£f| |f) BOSTON 




Sunday Speaker Points Out Benefits 
of Ood's Blessings. 

|{ev. Il.rlieit .1. White ot llarifold, 
Conn., addressed chapel Sunday morn- 
ing on "Cod's varied maces and the 
abundance with which He bestows 
them on man. We are. as the Bible 
says 'KHicient stewards of Cod's varied 
grace,' and it is the gf a t of Cod which 
Idesses a man. Bod shows His grace to 
us through personality, and as I'aul 
once said, 'his life was Hooded with 
grace. 

"In shedding His grace on us.Coii has 
done so by giving us a great variety of 
blessings. The hesl moments in a 
man's life are when he gels closest ta 
those things which Cod has made, and 
these coiislilule an immense amount ol 
variety. We have observed the variety 
nf Cod's plans in our researches; not a 
Ibiag is made exactly in duplicate, 
every blade of grass in the field dilleis 
from every other blade, and in respect 
to human beings, no two humans are 

If. api".'! 1 W« 

must have variety just like Sod, for we 
cannot stand the same thing again ami 
again. It is said l hat I he eai ly Kgy pi- 
laus, coining from a hilly country and 
settling t« the Nile valley, constructed 
I a* pvramids lo relieve t lie monotony 
of the level sky-line. We t hen pass in- 
to the mental and spiritual realm ot 
human nature, wheie variation is as 
i.ioiniiienl ih ever There is a great 
lillereiioo among members of I lie same 
family, and since w<- are so ditlcrcnt 
among ourselves, each one ol us has 
need ol R different Ihing. 

'All of us have ditlclcnt needs, dil- 
Continued on page 7 



< w'tain Eaosa 

I.ea'er and veteran auard of Steven* aslMtl 
which plays here tomorrow nutht. 

won three out of five games. Wesleyan 
was trounced in the first game, 48-18. 

West Point smashed through to a 48-88 
win over the Red and Cray. Delaware 
was beaten 35-25 in a brilliant second 
half comeback. Princeton was lucky to 
i gain a30-27 decision over CaptainEgger's 
Continued on page 



PROM PLANS PROGRESSING 

PRELIMS GOING RAPIDLY 

The ProH) Committee is meat tag every 
Wednesday evening and is fast complet- 
ing arrangemaata for ■ ■aeeaasfal week 

end. The coin mil lee on decorations 
has made arrangements with Dcnnlsnn 
Maiiiilacturing Co . and has drawn up 
elaborate plans for the settings ol the 
different booths and doorways. While 
birch will form an aitraciive leiture of 

the decorations. Ma n and while 

will he t he prevailing color tone. The 
music has not lien secured yet, bill 

ICeaara, VTaagh and Mosely have heard 
from a number of leaders who have 
offered exceptionally good music. 

The Prom dance will be held on Ibe 
armory floor, The supper will be served 
al about 1-1)0 o'clock in Draper Hall. 

Prelims are on sale now to any one 
who may wish I hem and may be ob- 
tained from members of the committee. 
The price is $3.00. Already over 55 
prelims ha'e been sold so that those 
wishing to purchase them had better 
get them at once as the number of tick- 
i ets to be sold is to be limited to 75. 



Coach Gore's Men Win from M. 1. T. 

but Lose to Crimson in Last 

Few Minutes of Play. 

Coach due's fast liaveling baskeiball 
learn got an even break in Iheir inva- 
sion of I he Hub cily last week, losing a 

bard, aa*alll fight la Harvard Wednes- 
day night 25-21, and outclassing Tech 
on Thursday night, winning 18-12. 

Al Cambridge the Maroon and While 
i|iiintel threw a decided scare into the 
Cilnisoii, and came within an ace of de- 
feating the last, heavier Harvard five. 
The game was fast a battle from start 
to finish. It was replete with brilliant 
haskelball, with (apt. Cowdy's live 
ouipassing and oiiiplaylng Harvard 
during the first period and half of the 
second. Aggie led at half lime 11 P. 
ami starling the s.-cond half , immedi- 
ately opened up a seven-point lead al 
111-12. Harvard's substitution of fresh 
men and -can angement of Iheir combi- 
nation were the deciding factors In en 
aiding the ( anihridgt .earn to go to ibe 
front 20-111, six minutes before the final 
whislle. and then earn a four-point 
lead. The foul shooling of Pallo, the 
Crimson's clever led forward, was also 
a big factor in Harvard's win. 

The whole team played hard, scrappy 
haskelball in bolh games, lighting fm 
eveiytbiug in sight, and had Harvard 
worried lor ibe entire distance. Con 
sidering the haul game of the night be 
lore, the perloiinaiice of the team 
against M. I. T. on Thursday is all lb. 
more credit to I hem, (a* they surely 
showed Hie way loTecli. holding them 
lo three llooi haskels. and keeping play 
dangerously near t he Tech basket al all 
times. 

The Hitrvard Game. 

• 

Play opened up fast, and Pallo. lroin 
ihefoiil line, scored for Harvard before 
the game was a minute old. Fills 
added a Soar basket, and then Thoinp 
son from the tloor and Hose r from the 
foul line, tied the score at three all, 
lour minutes from the start. Hosei 
sunk another lroin the foul line, only 
lo have Aggie's one point lead wiped 
out a moment later on two goals In 
quick succession by Pallo. Nearmg the 
Bad of the half, the score stood 9-'l 
against the striped jersey ouiutet. Jusi 
before I he close of the halt the M. A C 
outfit, by virtue of floor baskets by 
Koser and Thompson and by a foul tally 
by the former, hail worked iiitoall'-* 
lead. This was Aggie's half they had 
out passed Harvard, and hail outfought 
them, the defense compelling the Crim- 
son forward line to take long shots. 

The old Aggie fighting spirit was in 
evidence at the opening of the second 
half. Captain Oowdy's outfit came 
back at Harvard hard. Pallo sunk one 
from the foul line. The Aggie team 
was at the top of its passing game at 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 2, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 2, 1921. 



this point, aud had Captain Fitts's 
men baffled. The forwards broke 
through the Crimson defense and four 
Boor baskets were chalked up in quick 
succession— two by Uoser, and one each 
by Smith and Thompson. Pallo had 
meanwhile sunk two from fouls, mak- 
ing the score 19-12, and with the period 
half over. A spurt by the Cambridge 
men netted them three lloor baskets 
and ;i single counter while Massachu- 
setts was gathering one tally, and 
brought the score to 20-19 in Harvard's 
favor, and the name began to draw to a 
dose. Harvard's resubstituiions and 
lineup changes, plus the coming iuto 
the game of two treBh men, now began 
to tell, and during the remaining mo- 
ments, tloor goals by Tyson and Pallo, 
with the latter's two goals from fouls, 
established the small lead which won 
for Harvard. Marshman, from the foul 
line, brought Aggie's score to 21, as the 
game ended. 

No individual player can be specially 
cited, because the whole team played 
great basketball. Uoser scored ten 
poiuts, while the floor work and offen- 
sive play of Thompson was superb. 
Pallo and Fitts excelled for Harvard. 
The summary: 



minutes of the game, bringing the score 

to 18-12. 

Captain Gowdy was a tower of 
strength on the defense, and the play 
of the entire Aggie forward line, Smith, 
Uoser, and Marshman was A-l quality. 
Blood and Tonon played excellent ball 
for M. I. T. 

The summary: 

Smith, If HJ. Hubbard 

Uoser, rf >*, Blood 

Marshman, c c, Pink ham (Bachman, 

Burke) 
Qovdy.lt rf. Boyer 

Thompson (Hale), rg lf.Tonon(Sawyer) 
Score-M. A. C. 18, M. I. T, 12. 
Goals from door— Smith 2, Uoser, Marsh- 
man 2, Gowdy, Boyer, 2. Goals from 
foul line, Uoser 6, Boyer 4, Tonon 2. 
Ueferee.Shea. Time,20-minute halves. 

WHAT THE HOB TURNED UP 
IN BOSTON. 

Aggie had as many loyal rooters at 
the Harvard game as did Harvard. 



yours on defence gives the effect of a 
railroad crossing when the gales are 
down and no one is to pass. 

7. Your passing looks as if you knew 
when the old ball left your hands right 
where it was going to nestle next. 

8. You are a fit looking crowd. I 
couldn't see any Bigns of letting down 
near the end of the game, and you all 
looked afterward as if you had been to 
a Saturday afternoon matinee. 

9. You looked like worlk beaters to 
me. 



THE M1LLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Collet* Jewelir-Cuff Ltnki.Soft Collar l'lni. 
Drew Butt Set*. Violin. Banjo. Mandolin Htrlngs 

Fine Watch Repairing, also Broken Leasee 

Replaced PromDtly. 



32 Main Street, 



Amherst. Mass. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



Fitts rf 
Pallo If 
McLeish If 
Tyson c 
McLeish c 
Feiring rb 
Millis lb 
Chase lb 

Tolals, 



I1AKVAKI>. 

Gla 
4 
1 

2 


() 
1 



8 



M. A. C. 



(iowdy lb 
Thompson rb 
Marshman c 
Smith If 
Uoser rf 
Ball rf 



Ola 
1 
2 

2 
3 




Fie 

9 







9 

ii- 



1 


4 




Al sayB the United States Hotel isn't 
built so bad at that; the shortest way 
down leads to the dining room. 



Pta 

« 

11 



4 



2 

25 

Pta 
2 
4 
1 
4 
10 




Nobody would think off-hand that Al 
bad the strength to do it, but according 
to the Herald he hoed the potatoes and 
tilled the basketB in the M. I. T. game. 

Bunker Is so Binooth that the ticket 
girl at Keith's thought he was a specu- 
lator. 



A SPECIAL SUIT 

Single or double breasted in a cheerful brown effect, cut form-fitting, at $50 
for young men. Hand tailored— character in every curve. Individuality 
in every line. Overcoats in very snappy models from $40 to $75. 

MERBITT CLARK 8c CO. 



The manager promised the team tur- 
key if they won. They got as close as 
chicken. 



8 5 

Time 20m halves. 



21 



Heard from the Harvard bench: 
"Look at the Aggie numbers, they 
must have a big sqnad". Heard from 
the Tech bench, "The Aggies wear 
those big numbers to make us think 
they have a big squad". 



144 



Homm or Hmrt Mohmttnmr « Mmrx Cloths* 

Main Street, Northampton 



Totals, 
Heteree, Hoyt 

The M. I. T. Game. 

At Walker Gym, Thursday night, it 
was the Aggie's passing game that 
played the most conspicuous part in 
their clean cut victory over the en- 
gineers. The large court seemed to 
bother the Bay Staters for the first few 
minutes, but the latter part of the 
opening period, and the entire second 
period, saw Coaefa Gore's charges at 
their best in passing aud in defense. 

The name got away with a slow start, 
the ball going out of bounds several 
times. Tonon put Tech to the fore 
with a long shot from the floor, and 
made it 3-0 with a foul a few moments 
later. Uoser sunk a twin counter and a 
foul soon after, lying the score at three 
all, by the middle of the period. Boyer 
and Tonon raised Tech's count to six ; 
Uoser added one point from the foul 
line, aDd Captain Gowdy tied the score 
with a neat basket from the center of 
the floor. The Maroon and White de- 
fence tightened at this point, and the 
end of the half found the up-staters 
leading 9-7. 

Starting the second half, Smith, 
Uoser and Marshman garnered nine 
points before Boyer, for Tech, sunk one 
from the foul line. The Aggie five was 
traveling at top form and holding M. I. 
T. in check all the way. The defense 
baffled Tech's attempts to break through 
to within striking distance of the Ag- 
gie basket, and Tech scored only one 
floor basket during the second half, 
Boyer added three fouls in the closing 



Our Boston alumni turned out en 

masse. 



Johnny Hale's friend was a whole 
cheering section. 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



-FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



A digest of the Tech game: Al drew 
blood from a "Pinkbam", while Tommy 
hit 'Hubbard"- Burke said, "Bach- 
man" get sway from that "Marsh-man" 
or you'll get swamped. Hank said, "I 
"Saw-yer" 'Boyer" ain't so Hale as 
yer might be." Beal cried, "Get that 
"Ball" and "Hooper". "Hold up a 
minute", said Tommy, "is Ton-on?" 
"No", said Bunker, "He's in "Dutch" 
and they carried him off in a "Shea". 

A WORTHWHILE TRIBUTE 

What an alumnus who saw the Aggie 
basketball team at Middlebury has to 
say concerning his impressions of the 

team: 

1. Your first appearance on the floor 
made one feel that you were a real 
basketball team. 

2. You looked like a bunch who 
were clean players and lived up to every- 
thing that a gentleman in sport, 

implies. 

3. You look like a big team, on the 

floor in those suits. 

4. You looked as if your main job 
last Saturday night was to beat Middle- 
bury. A business like crowd, 1 should 

83 Y. 

6. You looked confident, but didn't 
appear loud or boastful. 
6. The effect of barred jerseys like 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 




fcuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillltoilfc- ™*oc 




ma»h- 



ANY tobacco — every tobacco — tastes better in a W D C 
k, Pipe. Our own specially seasoned and carefully selected 
French briar makes it so. Add to this the supercraftsman- 
ship of the Deinuth workers, and you'll not wonder that we 
claim pre-eminence in the quality of our pipes. Ask any 
good dealer. 

Wm. DEMUTH 8t CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLD'S LARGEST MAKERs'oF FINE PIPES 



Going ^0 Old 33 ! w hy not stop for a bite to eat or a bit of candy? 

Why not drop in before Alumni day and get a look at 
Fraternity Banners and Pillow Tops ? 

THE AGGIE INN 



At the entrance to the Aggie Campus. 



AGGIE LOSES TO F0RDHAM 

Continued from page 1 

il'cup of a slranue rink and live penal- 
lies tbey were unable to bold their oppo- 
nents. Considering the conditions and 
the kind of bockey Konlhain was play- 
ing the M. A. 0. men made a very cred- 
itable showing. Fouihani ranks as 

■ m' of the best teams in eastern oollc- 
gUlC bockey and to the AggtM ap- 
peared stronger even than Harvard. 

The home team took the lead soon 
alter the start of the came and scored 
lour of their goals in the opening period. 
\ggie came back strong again however 
and after holding the New Yorkers to 
..ne goal in the second period brought 
I he score up 5-3 soon after the final ses- 
sion opened. At this point Captain 
McCarthy was put off t lie ice for three 
niinuies for protesting to the referee 
and during this time Fordham scored 
three goals in rapid succession. 

"l'hil" Newell deserves much credit 
lor his work at goal. He made a iimn- 
lter of pretty stopsr Captain "Jerry" 
McCarthy and "Sonny"Mansell showed 
■oflM fast ami clever hockey and Collins 
m as also responsible for one Agyie goal. 
For Fordham the work of Duncan stood 

■ ■ut though every other member of the 
team except the goal tend caged the 
puck once. 

The lineups: 
at. a. ( . 
McCarthy, rw 

I.VoHS, C 

Mansell, Iw 
Pools, p 
Collins, cp 
Newell, g 



for Amherst. Koser shot two more 
fouls and Lee followed with another 
basket from lloor for the home team. 
At about this time Nail replaced Card, 
Stewart took Lee's place, and Hale 
went on for Aggie, while Smith tonka 
rest. The next live scores were on fouls 
by Snider. Smith had thought it over 
a while and upon a signal from Coach 
Core went in attain and inside of two 
minutes scored the only basket which 
his team was able to acquire. Snider 
shot one more foul. Smith was taken 
out and Hall took his place. Koser got 
in another foul and Hill scored bis sec- 
ond basket of the game, making the 
score 22- HHu Amherst's favor. In the 
last minute of play Koser was suc- 
cessful in his two attempts to gain an- 
other point. The game ended as soon 
as he shot his last foul. 
The line-up: 



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MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



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Hill, If 
Card, Nail.rf 
Lee, Stewart, C 
Snider, rg 

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M. A. ■ . 

If, Smith, Hall 

rf, Koser 

v, Marshman 

rg Cowdy 

lg, Thompson, Hale 



Coals from tloor: Amherst — Palmer, 
Lee, Hill t2); M. A. C. -Smith. Fouls- 
Amherst- Snider, 14; M. A . ('.— ROM! 

lit. bteferee- Qeiiaed of Holyoks. 



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Phono 302-W 

11 Amity St., Amherst, Man. 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



SEVERAL ALUMNI 

MEETINGS SCHEDULED 



KOHOHAM 

rw, Duncan 

rw, G. Noonati 

c, MeGotri 

p. J. Noonan 
cp, McPherson 
g- Powers 
Score- Fordham 8, M. A.C. 3. Both 
Human :i, McCuirk 2, McPherson, J. 
Noonan. C. Noonan. Collins, McCarthy, 
Mansell. Keferees— Lynch and How 
ard. Time —three 15-miuute periods. 
SIDE LIOHT8. 
spectators at the game were allowed 
-moke and with the low ceiling the 
■ Hiding soon, became so full of smoke 
"hat during the last two periods it bolh- 
i the players somewhat, especially 
be uoal tenders. 

The Aggie team had never played on 

Huefa a rink as they encountered in New 

I oris. It was not only very small and 

poorly lighted but had a row of pillars 

wn the side which bothered the Hay 

e men. 



AMHERST 22, M. A. C. 21 

Continued from page 1 

ne. Snider scored three fouls for 

\mherst and Koser came back with an- 

otber, tying the score. Each man 

led one mone foul, Koser got two 

•• and Snider one. A double foul 

• ailed on \gnie and Snider scored 

'"l both tries. Two more fouls for 

Boeer and one for Snider stopped the 

ing for a time and then Captain 

Fa! met of the Sabrinas brought the 

Amherst supporters to their feet by 

fine, the first basket of the game on 

■ "ice toss from the 15 foot line. Snider 

led one more foul and the half ended 

with Amherst ahead 11-9. 

At the beginning of the second half 

1 -cr scored three out of live tries and 

his team in the lead; but shortly 

r Hill dribbled down the lloor and 

•-d the second basket of tbe game 



Various Committees Plan Business 
For Week End. 

The program for the meetings of the 
various Alumni groups that will assem- 
ble this week Friday and Saturday, Feb. 
4 and 5 will include a meeting of the 
committee on courses of study which 
will he held Friday noon at 12 o'clock 
with President Hutterfield al luncheon. 
The committee on administration will 
meet at '.< A. M. Friday morning wit b 
I'tcsident Hutterfield at the Alumni 
otiice, where relationships between tbe 
state house aud college will be dis- 
cussed. 

At H-tt0 Saturday morning ibe Alumni 
committee on student activities will 
meet, and discuss the better co-ordina- 
tion of st ndent activil ies, and the con- 
tinuance of such traditions as the 
Freshman banquet, the picture scrap, 
etc. At 9, the Alumni business meet- 
ing will be held at which the reports of 
all committees will be heard, the sub- 
ject of membership endowment, which 
will be $100 life membership, will be 
taken up, and members for the build- 
ing committee will be appointed. 

At 10-30 there will be an Alumni 
meeting at which athletics of the col- 
lege will be discussed. This will be led 
by Professor Hicks. At this same hour 
a group on non-athletics will convene, 
which will be led by some member of 
the board. At 11 the memorial build- 
ing committee will meet the contractor 
and press for an early completion. It 
is hoped that the building may be 
completed for tbe Sophomore-Senior 
Hop. Supper will be held at Draper 
Hall at 6 o'clock. 

Many well known alumni are expected 
back for the week-end and a pleasant 
and successful time is looked forward 

to. 

The Alumni Committee on courses of 
study meets at noon on February 4tb 
with President Bulterfield. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office- $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 



"Reasonable in dollars and srn.se." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC.. South Deerfield. Masj 



Deuel's Drug Store 






TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



F*eftjee'«« Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 
MOEANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 



Manufacturers 
of 



Institution Cooking Apparatus 



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BOSTON 



C&rpfrvter & Morehouse, 

PRI|YTET*S, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherst, Mass 



The Ms*».chii»etts Collegian, Wednesday, February 2, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday , February 2, 1921. 



THE HUSSACHISETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural Colleu'f. 

BOARD Of EDITORS. 



LAt kkn< k I'. Mahtin II. Kditor-tn-i hlef 

Rohkkt I.. .Ionics VI Mansifing- Kditor 

ASBOCIATK ElUTOKK. 

IKIMI W. EllMAN V 

Kknnktii A. Bahnard V 
Stam.iv W. Hiu.mi.kv V 

PAOIi I. Ml KXK.TT "JSt 

Hohaist W. SPSISS 'Tl 
Bn.niNH F. JsfWSOS 'T2 
John ML WHTTIM '23 

I.. B. AllKIMiH'N VI 

Business 1>ki> a utmost. 

Herbbkt L. oitP" •■!». ■■! "" ■ »»"«« r 

Kvkukti CPMROKll Advertising M*ns*er 
Ohaui.es A. BOOH W emulation Manager 
MVRoN G. MlHRAV 'Tl 

llori>r> Whiitakkh -23 

OWKS K. I'oISoM "-'3 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copiea, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
msnaKer as soon as possible. 

Entered at second-class matter at the Anihertt 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing BtSBSrlnl 
rate of pOSSBSSS atw ided for in section 1I0S. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August «». t»18. 



Hello, Again, Mr. Alumnua. 
Another year has g*M bf, and on. e 
again we welcome back to our wintry 
campus *he alumni, the undergraduates 
of the past. 

Mister Alumnus, we are surely glad 
to see you. We are glad to greet one 
who has so generously ami loyally stood 
byAuglefor the past twelve months. 
We are proud to have you enter our 
classrooms and walk our paths atiain. 
and lo feel that you once lived where 
wo now live. It seems like the reunion 
of a great brotherhood, whenever we at 
M. I..C. clasp hands with those who 
have received their degrees here, 

You observe, Mister Alumnus, that 
we are about as happy as we were a 
year ago— a little more crowded, but 
just as happy. We still believe that in 
the centuries to come we shall see a 
new chemistry laboratory, I new iryro- 
nasium, three or four new dormitories, 
a new administration buildimr, and 
(sight of sights!) Mr. Green, excavated 
from beneath his manuscripts, content- 
ed in a new library. Yes. we still have 
foith. Occasional ly we wake each other 
in the night crying, "How long, O Lord, 
how long?", but not often. Ex-Prof. 
Neal once said: "I still have faith in 
Qod and the United Slates Senate". 
We say, "We still have faith in l'rexy 
and the Legislature". 

Hut, oh Misier Alumnus, you whose 
money has been so freely uiven for our 
sakes, please take a ROOd loo* around 
yuu while you are here! Then run 
home and tell your representatives at 
Boston what you have seen. Tell our 
legislative parents that they mii't ex- 
pect their "farmer baby" to wear the 
Baine short pants at M years of aae that 
be wore at 15! 

COMMUNICATION 



Exemption From Finals -A Reply. 
To tiik Borroa o* m Coi.i.kuian: 

Since I happen to bfl one of those 
hard-hearted individuals who believe in 
subjecting all students to final examin- 
ations regardless of their class standing, 
it may be well to reply to the criticism 



of K. U. '22 in last week's Coi.i.koian. 

Most students view this subject in a 
very one-sided manner. They should 
realize that 10 the instructor, even as t.» 
the student, the appeal of self-interest 
leads him to a strong desire to do away 
with the tinal. This is particularly 
true when it deals with the Kteshman 
and Sophomore required courses where 
the accumulation of some lot) "Blue 
Books," representing a two-hour final, 
means from three to four days of t In- 
most detestable and nerve-rackinn work 
that lulls to the lot of a teacher; this, 
he il remembered when he is often just 
as anxious as the student to leave for a 
holiday. A"d let me remark in pass- 
in», that when we hear ot our brother 
instructors posting lists of exemptions, 
including as blgl as 50 per cent, of 
their class roll, we are inclined to look 
at it a hit differently from the student. 
I'lcase remember that old-fashioned 
laziness is a failing of all the sons ol 
Adam college faculties not excepted. 

Well, why hold linals anyhow P Again 
you must consider the suhjeet from all- 
ot her aspect. If a student has made a 
grade of 60 pel cent, he is entitled to 
the benefit U) bsj derived from such a 
tinal. Not to give il to h in is to rob 
him of what is an integral and import- 
ant part of the curse. Not the mere 
ad of writing down the answeis to a set 
of questions, bal in the preparation 
antecedent to thai, lies the supreme 

■pod, 

During I lie term we give certain quiz- 
zes dealing with detached parts of the 
course. Only in preparation tor the 
final, however, do most students ever 
get a synthetic view of the term's work. 
Any course, worthy of the name, is 
constructed around a certain principle 
or group of principles. Its facts are 
most subsidiary and should radiate 
toward or from the dominant idea. If 
the facts are rightly articulated, the 
whole course forms a unit. From ex- 
perience I know that this single vision 
of a term's work is first gained during 
preparation for the final examination. 
It is the thing that the student carries 
with him long after specific details 
have faded. No instructor has a right 
to deny his students, and above all his 
best ones, this reward- this consumma- 
tion of a terms faithful study. 

If we could get the review without 
the final afteiwards, that would be 
ideal— but again, only a slight experi- 
ence convinces us that we are all lazy 
animals and that we need a spur. The 
final examination is the bit of steel that 
goads us forward for our own good 

The teacher must sometimes perform 
a disagreeable duty. He must refuse 
permission to certain students to take a 
final examination. This term, work 
shows that they have not grasped facts 
firmly enough to enable them to under- 
stand general principles. You, who 
arc admitted to finals are honored, 
since we signify thereby that we be- 
lieve you to have titled yourselves to 
use the higher centers of the hrain in 
assemhling and coordinating your facts 
into a block of knowledge. And to the 
honor man, there applies the old phase, 
'noblesse oblige." Not to do less, but to 
have the glorious privilege of doing 
moie, is his high reward. 

Another point must be considered. 
Throughout our lives we have to stand 
recurrent grillings of just this type— re- 
current finals. The demand comes 
suddenly for an address, a lecture, a 
decision. The great man is he who in 
short order can marshal his resources, 
nan focus the arc-ligbt of his intellect 
upon the matter in hand, can compare, 
articulate and pass the test Why not 



begin to get this training In college? 

If we now take up \i. It's arguments 
against the system of final examina- 
tions, I think we shall discover that 
the] some dangeroaaly near to being 

sophistries. 

Exemption from finals as an incentive 

to scholarship was intended as a joke. 

Tiie student works because he likes to 

work, because he is interested, because 
I be has a divine desire to know some- 
thing about this curious universe in 

which he finds himself. The unfortu- 
nate man who will make 85% to get out 
Of a final and 60% If »»e knows he can't 
get oat, is, Thank (;.>d, as rare as the 
hoop snake. 

1 am at one with It H. in his desire 
to do away with three examinations in 
on,- day. A final examination is a 
man's job. a sudden and considerable 
drain on the nerve forces. Hut the evil 
which results in the congestion of three 
and even four examinations per day lies 
deep. Students are carrying too many 
eourses and are often forced to do 
superficial, dilletante work on some of 
them. As long as credit hours mount 
up half way to the forties we shall have 
this undesirable condition at the time 
of finals unless the examination period 
be unduly extended. Obviously the 

raised] Is to take fewer eoaraoa and <b> 
more Intensive work on them, then 
finals will fulfil their rightful and high 
fund ion. 

K. H. feels the need of some incentive 
to high scholarship and with that I am 
in fall sympathy. Yet I wonder if the 
incentive to scholarship isn't inherent 
in the thing itself. 

Our American boy is sometimes 
nearly ruined by high school faddists 
bent on the application of "methods", 
his understanding of the true meaning 
of college education is sadly distorted 
by forces both without and within the 
gates. He can, however, be led slowly 
forward to cultivate habits of mental 
alertness, concentration, intensity. 
Then as he matures, as the higher cen- 
ters of his brain begin to function more 
vigorously, as he steps onto the first 
(able-land of knowledge aud breathes a 
keener air and gets a glimpse of the 
wonder ahead, he catches the spirit of 
Intellectual Life and the rest is easy. 

1 wonder if Mr. K. K. is aware thai 
the true menial life of M. A. C. isn't 
really at the low ebb which one might 
infer from his sentences. Having had 
experience with students in four col- 
leges, I can Bay truthfully that the 
grade of work I am receiving from stu- 
dents here is equal to that in any of the 
others. Students, completely worthy 
of the name, really do exist even in the 
somewhat hostile aud unfavorable en- 
vironment of M. A. C.and their number 
is not small. To be sure, they may 
never make I'hi Kappa Phi, but that is 
a small point. They have dune of their 
own free wills something, besides which 
there is nothing greater— they have 
taken the next forward step in their 
own evolution R. B. ToWssTT. 



TOWN MALL 

Thursday 



Hat. at 3 

Etc. i shows 

6-4?. 8-30 

pmiraai 

Mat. 17c. 2'e 
Eve. 28e. 33c 



sri'KK-i'Kom rrtoN DAY) 

Mary PieKford la "P«H»- 

tnni," from Kleanor H. Sor- 
ter's novel— one of the great 
stories for which the aSSSM 
inent loving world has lo. « 
awaited. It Is a wonderful 
story that ALL members of 
ALLfamilles will want to see 

Pathe News Topics 

Matt and Jeff 



Friday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 

Saturday 

Mat. at 3 

Eve.— 2 Shows 
6-45. 8-30 



Mitchell Lewis .Helen Fer- 
guson and Noah Beery in 
"The Mutiny of the Elsi- 
nore," from .lack London's 
story of adventure. 

Scenic 
.'reel MacK Sennett Comedy 

Tern Ml* In "3 Geld Coins." 

Another Mix thriller of tin- 
West filled with Mix's dsre 
devil stunts In which he plan 
a dual lole. that of cowho> 
and bandit. 

"The Kins of the Circus" 
News Comedy 



Monday 



Mat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Clara Kimball Young in 
"Mid-Channel." by Sir Ai 
thur winir Ptoero. The f:. 
nioiis drama In which Ktlo I 
Barrymora mated a pram 
lion in New York. 

Pathe Review, Meet Comedy 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

CATKRINO WOK 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At FRATKKNITIKS EVKKY NHSHT 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Oevefopfnp and Printing 

Hills Studio Phone 456-R 



LOW PRICES 

— ON— 

SilkHosiery 

"Phoenix," $1.10 and $1.95 pr. 
" Gordon," 98c and $2.19 pr. 

All qualities in 

Black, White or Cordovan. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 




COMMENCEMENT 

PROGRAM OUTLINED 

At chapel Jan. 31, Dean Lewis dis- 
OUSted i tit- change in the Commence- 
menl profrran. Kvery member of the 
Htiident body is expected to remain mi 
the campus from .lune 10 to the loth to 
participate i» the live day celebration. 
The festivities will include Citizen's 
Day, Student's Day, Alumni Day, Grad- 
uation Day, and plans are now in prog- 
ress for a pageant. After Dean Lewis' 
talk Harlan Worthier '20 led the col- 
lege in practicing various college songs 
in "preparation for Alumni Day. The 
Glee club also rendered several se- 
lections, 



This being a thinking age, we need 
only remind college men that price 
is never a test of cheapness. 

A poor article at any price is • 
poor buy. 

Suits and overcoats are h 
ments. Consider the character of the 
house behind them. 

With us you're not only assured of 
the best at a fair price, but money 
back any time, if you want it. 

Rogkrs Pkkt Company 

Broadway 
at S4tb St. 



Broadway 
at 13th St. 

Broadway 
at Warren 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 



Fiftli A' e 
at 41»t St. 




CUTS AND OVER-CUTS 

If you over-cut Chapel, you'll hear about it from the Dean. 
If you don't visit Walsh, you'll notice it in yourself. 
At Walsh's you Get the latest CUTS in suits 
And the latest CUTS in prices. 
DON'T OVER-CUT WAI.SII 



FAST GAME EXPECTED 

WITH NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Varsity Quintet to Piny Old Rivals. 
Several Letter Men on Each Team. 

Tbe vsraltj basketball team will be 
I lo ils fullest capacity next Naiui- 
daj when ii plaji New Hampshire state 
on tin- Drill Hall ilo<>r. The team from 
Durban has been going si t<>p spied in 
its firsl four gsnes ; each game retail- 
ing in a \icioiv for New 'Hampshire. 

\t itie begiolof, of I heir basketball 
,,•;!>.. >n the prospects, foi i good team 
were exceptions)!] brlghl beeanM of 

i in- tan I bat sin I* '•! men bad re- 
I orbed to the fold Anion;; these men 
were Captain pled Auderson, Butler 

who had been e'lven ,, ,, \|!-\,w Eng- 
land berth, and Perry. 

I lnii four \ i a i' h Middlebarj , 

Couuectfeut, Brown and Tuft* were all 
wiiii by small margtoa whieh indlcstei 

thai although I he tic hi line may he 
ni rung, i h. .lit. nut up lo the 

standard ol thai sstvle which lliey will 
en.uiiniei on &a tarda) In Amherst. 

Sherwood at Isfl guard is I new man on 

\aiMty squad lie is a SopbO 1 

mil will undoubtedly develop into a 
■ I man. 

Dowdy ami Thompson are fast shap- 
ing Into one ot the ■trongesi back 

couples which has e\el played nil all 

iggfeteaaa. Oowdj is always on the 
ipet. His playing 1« lbs last two names 
ii is been eery good. 
In Butler, at right forward, tbe New 

Hampshire team has a man who BM 
made an exceptional record for him- 
s.it in the last two years. He has 
played on the Auuic Boor before and his 

Work will lie watched with interest by 
all. Opposed lo him will he "Dutch" 

ier, who In bis fiiet year on tbe vai 

has alln.nl> made a name for him- 

I both in eoastlag Boor baskets aad 
In snooting foulH. La tbe recent game 
wiih Ambers) be gbot lf> fowls, as ea- 

viahle record. At left forward on the 
Sew Hampshire team is Perry who lhu> 

tai lias been the high poorer lor his 

m. A . W. Smith plsylog riuht for- 
ward lor Aggie is fast on his feet and a 
1 Root man. bat his eye has not 

as good lately. Kvei.y I has 

his spells of hard luck though, ami 

every Aygie rooter \h hoping lo esc 

Smith come into his old form this week 

Opposed to Marshinan at centei is 

1 apt. Anderson. MarKhnian is not PO 

rlenosd as Anderson bal his 

-hi and keen eye give him an 

equal chance. 

New Hampshire has yel to play 

Maine, B. U., Worcester, Harvard, and 

1'iiu. The team they play here in 

Vniherst, Saturday will he one of the 

' teams which they will face all 

ii Aggie rooters are behind the 

a man and want lo see the New 

-hire jinx banished for good and 

The New Hampshire line-up is Butler. 
rry, If , Anderson, o, Stafford, rg, 

' 'MWond. IjJ. 



M. A. C. SEPTET MEETS B. C. IN 
FEATURE GAME ALUMNI DAY 



Aggi«* Out For Vengnnce After De- 
tent in Arum: Temn Plays 
Tufts Thursday. 

Tbe coming weekend will be another 
busy one for the Iggle boekej seven, 
Returning from Boston to-daj tiny will 
p!a> Tufts os tbe new rink lomorroa 

afternoon ami mi Saturday will play 

Huston College in what promises, to be 
one ot ibe beet games tbie eesson. 

The M. \. C. scpirt has mil played at 
Lome since the opening game wllb 
Ambers! but tomorrow and Saturday, 
weather permitting, the student bodj 

and alumni as well will have a chance 
tn see '>ne of Ihe strongest ol Aggie 
sevens in action on Ihe home rink. 

Unless the dope is badly upset < oaoh 

Manscli's team should return a winner 

on Thursday. Tufts has \ei io prove 
herself In a class wllb Aggle'a previous 1 
opponent*. The Brown and Blue lost 
her opening gaase and has not yet 
struck a winning stride. A fact of in- 
terest lo connection with the gsme hi 
thai Captain David snow of Ihe visiiing 

team is | brother of "Johnny*' .Snow 

who will be iii Ibe Aggie lineup. 

The game with Boston College was 
arrasged see special feature lor Alumni 

Das. In Ihe Huh seven MA. <'. will 



M. v. «. 

IfeCart by, i w 

Man sell. 1 
Lyons. i 
Snow, rw. 

Collies, ep 
Poole, p 

Newell, u. 



BOSTON ' oi.i i ..I 

Iw, Uarrily 

r, Curry 

c, M ngbee 

rw, Mealy 
cp, K. tfoi rissey 
p. I,. Morii 

n. Urban 



The Blgata rhi EpsHou fraternity beM 

a successful dance at (heir house on 
Saturday, .Ian. 2w. from '5 to U p. m 
Ninleen couples allennded . Mrs. I.oinau 
■ •I Smith College chaperoned the parly. 




NEW YORK CITY 



Helen Hand, graduate student in 
loolology, is teaching one of I*. P. 
Band's, courses in English. 



DrtWMd with coosldeMtiori 
form ccnu and In oh»CTV«nct 
cf tht principle; -f nuStscreticn 



Designed Right 
Built Right 
Installed Right 
It is Right 



A Better Way of Milking 

[ ONG ago the De I-aval Con 
* realized there is no more P. 
for hand milking than for har^ 
a grain crop by hand. But dc ' piing 
a milker wai not imply a problem in 
mechanics. Aswecewrul mechanical 
iiii!k< r must work in liarn.'i y with the 
delicate orgaSUMI of a In II g cow. 

After many year% of research end 
after four years of commercial use, th;: 
Oc Laval Milkt r has proved lobe a 
better way < i milking. It cumulates 
drudgery andiacreasc the flowof milk. 

The De U»al will M*t jour 
dairy SSStSSSS m«.rt pivfitatlt snd 
plesMot. Wriitl rfui:i..l.ru *.'on 

The De Laval Separator Company 
NFWV0RK CmCViO SAM FlAftCrSOI 

145 Bn.«iwJiy l»E.»WissiSt <.l IW»'c S! 



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■'»* 





have a real opponent and Captain Mc- 
Carthy and his males will have In show 
tome real hockey. In a game in the 
Arena at Hohioii Monday Bight, B.C. 
triumphed by a score of '2 to 1 and hack 
on their own rink Ihe Aggist are out 

for revenge The Hosion aggregation 

has lust only one game ihus lar that 
to M. I. T. b] one goal. However, she 
has not played teams of Ihe caliber of 
Fordbam and Harvard and cannot claim 

the achievement of holding the Crim- 
son to a 'I to t) score. The conies! 
Monday night was so close that 
an\ break of the game might have 

turned il the othei way and the oae 

Saturday promises lo be just as hard 

fought. On the form ehsdiaplsyed 
agaiasl Harvard Id A. C. should win, 

bal il will he no easy game. 

The teams will probably line-up as 
follows : 



A oatered soppei wasssrvad at 7 o'clock 
Dunlin's orchestra furnished Ihe 

music. 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Ami other good tinnus in sat 
MRS. L. Ml STEBBINS 

Ml.l.ll.- Stieet. Tel .4ir.W> llailley. tlsSI 

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Opt Solos ss «»•»«! |«s«jv>olvr 

a fl BsSs:nt Street iiipnne llluht 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Kuiiy o— reniaed 

N0VICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neat ly ami ptomply done 

Work called for and delivered 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. Tel. 9 J 

Vermel iy Colassbes * si<- 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 
WHILE YOU WAI I 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - Mass. 



lis tkiHsrm^ulit&oj 
sPlcat* I 



tK'C'w 



Soon er or later you will use a 

De Laval 

Milker or Cream Separator 



s 

H 

SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



8 IK)!« 

h-(M) r 



4-(HI P 



7-(H> P 



H-m i- 



The Mawachueetts Collegian, Wednesday, February^l92L 

Amherst House Shoe Repairing 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 2, 1921. 



vs. 



7-<MI p 



H-IH1 I' 



(MMt A 



Wkhnkmiav, FbB. 2 
m. — Assembly, Student Forum. 
M _2-V«:ii basketball M. A. C. 
vs. Sumebl School at Suflield. 

Tut issnw , Fkii. ft. 
M . -Hookey, M. A. 0. vb. Tufts 

at M. A. C. 
\i.~ Roister DnUter Rehearsal, 

Social I'nioii. 
M . Basketball. M. A. 

Stevens, at Drill Hall. 

Ki:ii»w, Fk.h. 4. 
Winter Alnmni Day. 
m.- Social I'lnon Concert, John 
Kciulrick BssgS, followed by 
Musical Claim Concert, in 
llowker Auditorium. 
m. •>■ Year Ibtsketball M. A. C. 
vs. Clarke School, at North- 
ampton. 
BATORDAT, Kni. 2. 
Winter Alumni Day. 
m. — Alumni KmUdcBooS M4, 
Btoekbridg* Ball. 

|tt:U> v.M.-Mcetinu of alumni iutei- 
Mt»d in athlciics. Slock- 
hridae Hall. 
M.- Meelinu "• alumni inter- 
ested in non-athletics, Stock- 
hridne. 
M.- Hockey, M. A. 0. vs. IImv 

lOB College at M. A. C. 
m. Basket ball, M. A. C. vs. 
New Haini'shiro State, at M. 
\ c. 
7 HO i\ m. Fraternity Banquets. 
:t-(H) p. m.- Freshman haskethall, M. A. 
C. vs. Williston.at F.asihamp- 

toll. 

Sunday, Fkk. H. 
it-iu) a.m.- -Sunday < hapel, .speaker, 
liabbi Charles Fleischer. Hus- 
ton. 
TtTKSDAI , Fm 8. 

M.— Senate MeetiiiL'. 

M . Bolster Doister Hehearsal, 
Social Union. 

m. (llee Club Rehearsal. 
Stocklindu'e. 
\Vki>nksi>av, Fin. '». 
•'-ltd v. M. -Hockey. M. A.C. W. Am- 
herst at Pratt Kink. 

\i Fresh man basket hat I. M. 
\ C. vs. Amherst llitfh. at 
Hlfffc School llvni. 



VARSITY RELAY TEAM 

OPENS 1921 SEASON 



Shorn 
RmomMna 



Shorn 

Shlnm 



LOW v. 



g-ttl p 



o-tHI !• 



7-00 P. 
7(H) P. 

7-tt»t p 



First Race With New Hampshire 
State at Boston On Feb. 5. 

The varsity relay will ba\e a chance 
(..prove its worth at the New Boston 
Arena, Saturday. Feh. ft, when it runs 
its first race against New Hampshire 
Slate. The men to make t he trip are 
Gray, Sullivan, WoodwoN h,Mac(iready, 
Allen, and Slate, who will he accompa- 
nied by Manager UHbert and Coach 
Dickinson. Slate, who will run the 
handicap mile, is in good trim and will 
glva his opponents a run for their 

money. 

Not much can be ascertained of the 

two teams, as neither has run hefore 

this season. The New Hampshire 8#> 

(reflation is composed practically of 

new material, which at the first Of the 

MMon was making I rather poor show - 

lag . l.aszasse and l'aine are StSOBSJ 

theveterens who appeared at the lirst 

call tor cantlidates. However, under 

the coachinu of H. I! < Icveland ami 

Wi ntwoith, former N. II. stat, the team 

btdsfalMO keep up New Hampshire's 

usual reputation for a good race. 

The men who will represent Agftlc 
al the nieei Saturday have not heen 
picked yet, hut the material at present 

looks ti 1 lor ■ very successful season. 

The two veterans, Sullivan and liray, 
are hittimj tip their usual stride, ami 
are being hacked up inimitably 1>> 
Wood WOtrth and Mac< ready, who won 
lame in all Freshman contests last year. 
Mien. '21. has also l.een showing good 
form thus far. Coach Dickinson is put- 
ting his men throiih u their tinal work- 
out this week, in preparation for Sat 
unlay, and it may he safely said that 
Captain liennie liray is feeding one of 
the most promising teams which Aggie 
has put out in several yeais 



T. MIENTKAS 



—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing I , 9 pi ea iant Street 
13 Pleasant St.. Amherst, Mass. 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real Rargaius in 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles ol shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this BALK I 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing .lone b> 

J. GINSBURG 

On your way ii|> town. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALKKS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



H-00 



TO PLAY STEVENS THURSDAY 

Continued from page 1 



the and llaverford sticcumhed 4:1-13. 

Auainst this team. Coach (iore will 
probably send the same five which has 
started every name to dale. Right now 

the Mar I and While forward line is 

travelling at a fast clip, and Matshman. 
at center, ranks with t he best in Root 
work and in shooting ability. The 
team's pass work has heen an import- 
ant asset in their names to date and 
will prose the same against Stevens. 
Booer'S foul shooting la the Amherst 
uamestamps him as at leasi the equal 
Of Kurtv. ThOttgb on paper, Stevens 

.hows np best, the M. A.C. qalatet, as 

shown by their exhibition against Harv- 
ard, is developing into a clever panning, 

smooth working, lighting combination. 
It will take a good team to break 

through Aggie'edefeaee, with Captain 

(4owdy and Thompson in their present 
form. All in all. the game looks like 
an even chance either way 

The pro'. able lineups: 
m. x... sTKvane. 

smith, it rg, Rgger (capt.) 

Koser,rf lK, Ib.th 

Marshman, c ''• l' r "™ hl 

Gowdy,lg(capt.) rf, Kurty 

Thompson, r« If, Higley 



FRESHMAN FIVE BEATS 

GREENFIELD HIGH 29-8 
The Greenfield blgheehool basketball 

team was completely outplayed by tb« 
r'reshman basketball live last Saturday 
afternoon in the Drill Hall, when the 
Freshmen ran away with the score of 

2\>#. The geese started at a good dip. 

hut the superior team work and the 
better defense of the Freshmen made it 

impossible for the Greenfield team to 

run up a large score. At the end of 
the first half the scute stood 1:5(1. Then 
the Freshman defense settled down and 

Greenfield seered only once during the 

remainder of the "lime. Many times 
the visiting team tried to bring the bell 
up the Moor, only 10 be met by the 
formidable Freshman defense. Then 
the ball would go to the Freshmen, and 
before Greenfield could perfect its de- 
fense-two points. Greenfield played a 
good game, but the Freshmen played 
better. Ferranti's consistent eye helped 
the Freshmen to Rather several points 
from free throws as well as from the 
floor, liarker, at center, tossed in a 
few btmkatS. The lineup: 

KKKSHMKN OKKKNHKI.H llhill 

Kane. Harrows, rf lg, Hougbtoa 

Ferranti, Bait let, If rg, Andrews 

Barker, Kane, a B, Woodrow. Hart man 
Weatherwax, llairston, rjj 

If, Buckley. Bonneville 

Bike. In rf. l'artenheiinei, Bonneville 

Goals from SOOT— Kane 2, Barrows. 

Ferranti 4, Barker g, Bike :i Woodiow. 

Hartinan. l'artenheimer. B.mneville. 

Goals from fouls— Fei ranti .'>. Score - 

M. A. C. 1 ( .)24 29, Greenfield Ui«b School 

8. Referee— Hawlev 



CORDUROY RIDING BREECHES, 

White Mercerized Oxford Soft-collared Shirts, 
Aeroplane Cloth Shirts, best thing in town, 
Hest Grade Imported Heather Wool Sox, 



Now $6.00 

Now $3.20 

Now $3.60 

Now $1.25 



Special reductions on Felt Hats, Suits, Over- 
coats, Leather Coats, Sheep-lined Coats, etc. 

This is a Rood TIME and PLACE to stock up. 



P. M. THOMPSON & SON 

..Clothes for College Men for 35 years. 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Farming history shows that over-production and low prices 
one year are almost invariably followed by much smaller 
crops and higher prices the next. To the far-seeing farmer 
this means opportunity. While others wait, he acta. He 
plants ; and when the rise comes his crops are grown. 

Do you see the situation in that light? 

E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers are ready to help . They are 
good fertilizers — formulated, mixed, 
cured right. They'll not only give 
your crops a quick start, but they'll 
keep right on feeding them to suc- 
cessful maturity. The very best in- 
gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 
of manufacturing experience go into 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers. 






HAT U r «»ft aop. Bu- 
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Order now for Spring planting. If wfv 
no dealer near you. write for the agency. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., Inc. 

a*6«M*iiir» 0/ The American Agricultural Ckemieal 0: 

51 Chamber* St. New York City 



■toreil. Always marketable. 
Or. reed It Sod also en- 
riches soil (or next crop. A 
reasonable application of K. 
Frank Coe's Special Top 
Dressing should nearly 
double yield. Mention your 
•oils and write for Tatuable 
bonk "The Nefleeted Hay 
Crop." Free, with oar fer- 
tilizer suggestions. 



E.FRANK COES 



Rcq.U.S. Pat. Off. 



Fertilizers 



« , to 



incvease 'the yield of every 



t'ii'ld 



COLLEGE 
STORE . . . 



CHARLES A. FLEISCHER 

TO SPEAK SUNDAY 

The speaker in Chapel next Sunday, 
IVIiruary 6, will be Uahbt (harlea 
lleischer of Boston. Rabbi Fleischer 
\sas born in Ureslau, Germany, in 1K71, 
and at the age of nine emigrated with 
hie parents to the United Stales. In 
1888, he received his A. B. from the 
i .illeue of the City of New York, and in 
i>'.»:f, was awarded his Litt. B. by the Uni- 
rerelty Of Cincinnati. In thesameyear, 
lie was appointed rabbi at the Uebrew 
Union College al Cincinnati, and in 

i. he succeeded Rabbi Solomon 
Handler of the Temple Israel of Boston, 
i\ hi i'li office he held until 1911 when he 

mized and became the leader of the 
Minday Commons, an independent re- 

<>us body of Boston. He has lectured 

conalderaoljf and has also been a gener- 

• ontributor to magazines and news- 

pitpers. He is editor of Democracy and 

member of the City Club and the 

i vMiitieth Century Club of Boston. 



If it's for HAT RENOVATING, 
GLOVE GLEANING or SHOE 
DYEING, CONSULT THE COL- 
LEGE SHOE -SHINE PARLOR 
BY THE AMER. EX. OFFICE. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



MERIT 

Judged on the merits of its contribu- 
tion to human welfare the Hairy Indus- 
tn ranks first in point of service to 

mankind. 

This service stands or falls upon abil- 
ity to produce milk foods with their nu- 
tritive qualities and delicious flavors 
unimpaired. 

in like manner the distinctive, sani- 
tary cleanliness which the use of 



provides, constitutes a service which 
u>^ contributed largely to the high 
standard of quality maintained ip the 
field of Hairy Production. 

Hnring the year before us you can 

place your orders for this great cleaner 

in fall confidence that tbequality which 

-riven character to this product will 

adfastly sustained. 

ImU.,n in circle 



It cleans clean. 



in even pkg. 
Th e J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




INLAY ONE OF THESE ON YOUR FAVORITE PIPE 



# 

$1.40 



19 M 23 M 

$1.75 75c 



Fraternity Letters at 60c apiece. Leave your 
pipe bowl with us and give us a week to get 
it back to you. 



TWO-YEAR QUINTET NOSES 
OUT VICTORY OVER JUNIORS 



Freshmen Outlassed by Faster Soph- 
omore Outfit. 

In the inter-class names played last 
Friday on the Drill Hall Moor the Jun- 
iors lost a close game to the Two-year 
by a ^4 to 2:1 score and the BophoBSOteS 
defeated the Freshmen 17 to 8. 

The Juniors have lost four straight 
games, but the peeuliar thing about 
their season is that although they haw- 
lost all their games their opponents 
liave scored but ueven more points for 
the season than they have. 

The feature of the Junior's game was 
the floor work of Handall and Clark. 
Clark played his usual consistent game 
while Uaudall played more brilliant l> 
than at any time this season. Hisseven 
lloDr baske's were the scores that kept 
his team in the game at all times. With 
but five minutes to go, the Juniors wcie 
behind 2>\ to 14. Their hist nine points 
were scored in short order. 

In the other game the all-round work 
of Tumey featured the work of Sopho- 
mores while Harrows excelled for the 
Freshmen. Sargent also played well 
and as a partner with Tumey completes 
a pair that is hard to stop. 

The scores : 
1022. rwo yka u. 

Hooper, rf rf, (iirard 

Wentsch, rf rf, Stevens 

Lewandowski, If c, Brant 

Handall, c rg, (tones* 

Krasker, rg lg, Adair 

Clark, lg 

Score— Two Year24, Juniors 2'A. Has- 
kets from Hoor— Handall 7, Oirard 5, 
Stevens 4, Wentsch 'A, Hooper, Crant 
and Greene. Haskets from foul —Stevens 
2, and Clark. 

1MB. 1024. 

Sargent, If If, Hart let I 

Hunter, rf rf, Qtfford 

Tumey, c c, Harrows 

Alger, rg rg, Hairston 

W'irth, lg lg, Hru niier 

Johnson, lg lg, Merrick 

Score— 1023,17; 1024, 8. Baskets from 
floor— Sargent 3, Tumey 2, Mger and 
Gifford. Baskets from foul— Tumey ."> 
and Barrows 6. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

Continued from page 1 



ferent experiences, tasks, paths, suc- 
cesses and lives ahead of us and the 
question arises as to who will supply 
these needs. The One who has made 
such a variety can alone supply us with 
our needs, and by looking back on our 
lives, we will realize how different 
characteristics and likes have been iu- 
stilled in ustbrough ourassociation with 
people who have acted as mediators of 
the grace sent by God. God mediates 
His grace to us through those about us, 
and here in college we are influenced 
for the better by the very character of 
some of the professors with whom we 
come in contact. God recognizes the 
difference in all of us, and bestows His 
very graces accordingly, even now plan- 
ning better things of every sort for us. 
We will never become "efficient" 
stewards of God's varied graces until we 
arrive at the point where we radiate the 
best, through our personalities,and also 
learn to receive the same." 



When serving 



NOUSE PARTIES OR LUNCHES 

consult us. If you do not see 
what you want in our display, 
tell us and we will make it. 



W. B. DRURY 

io Main Street. 



WRIGLEYS 




KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



PLAZA 

Northampton . Mum. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Hint 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Are hIiow ii. 

Program changed daily axctat Monday 

end Tuesday. 

MJKII'K I'. IlKI.Moyi. .Mnniigcr. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



Cmndy Shoa 



Soda Pmrlor 



BECKM ANTS 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton. 



Mmamachumotta 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, lilC, Northampton, Mass. 



An optical ithop which m ensures up to the 
blffbeat standard <>f modnrn aervice. Ton 
CM rely on our skill and good taste In all 
Optica] matters. 



Our Art Deputmont Im tilled with picture 
nultahle. for th« decoration of "frat" opium 
or for hirthday ami wi-ddiim glftn. Greeting 
cards, for particular people. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 2, 1921. 




Hats That Sell Themselves 



That's what our Spring line of imported 
,^_ _ English and Italian Borsalino Pelts have 
be^Tdoing-to try one on is to buy one. We advise 
immediate action while we still have a range of sizes. 
And just for fun we are closing out our DOBBS HATS 
at $4.50— -a regular gift price. 



(•5S5S-. _ 




J 



How is a Wireless 
Message Received? 



EVERY incandescent lamp has a filament. Mount a metal 
plate on a wire in the lamp near the filament. A current 
leaps the space between the filament and the plate when the 
filament glows. 

Edison first observed this phenomenon in 1833. Hence it was 
called the "Edison effect." 

Scientists long studied the "effect" but they could not explain 
it satisfactorily. Now, alter years of experimenting with Crookes 
tubes, X-ray tubes and radium, it is known that the current that 
leaps across is a stream of "electrons"- exceedingly minute particles 
negatively charged with electricity. 

These electrons play an important part in wireless communica- 
tion When a wire grid is interposed between the filament and the 
plate and charged positively, the plate is aided in drawing electrons 
across; but when the grid is charged negatively it drives back the elec- 
trons. A very small charge applied to the grid, as small as that re- 
ceived from a feeble u -less wave, is enough to vary the electron 
stream. 

So the grid in the tube enables a faint wireless impulse to control 
the very much greater amount of energy in the flow of electrons, and 
so radio signals too weak to be perceived by other means become per- 
ceptible by the effects that they produce. Just as the movement of 
a throttle controls a gre^t locomotive in motion, so a wireless wave, 
by means of the grid, affects the powerful electron stream. 

All this followed from studying the mysterious "Edison effect"— 
a purely scientific discovery. 

No one can foresee what results will follow from research in pure 
science. Sooner or later the world must benefit practically trom the 
discovery of new facts. 

For this reason the Research Laboratories of the General Electric 
Company are concerned as much with investigations in pure science 
as they are with the improvement of industrial processes and products. 
They, loo, have studied the "Edison effect " scientifically. The result 
has be-n a new form of electron tube, known as the " photron" , a cype 
of X-ray tube free from the vagaries of the old tube; and the ' kene- 
tron", which is called by electrical engineers a "rectifier" because it 
has the property of changing an alternating into a direct current. 

All these improvements followed because the Research Labora- 
tories try to discover the "how" of things. Pure science always 
justifies itself. 



G 



E?1! 



eia@r; leetric 

General Office QOt^pB^Uy Schenectady, N.Y. 




THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 



(Give ui ■ trial J 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



G, H. RUMERY, Electrician 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUQS AND CARPETS 

— K. I). MAKSH KSTATK — 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

AT — 

Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 
Amherst, - M** 8 



95-377 L 



—The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place fc* 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 9, 1921. 



No. 14 



N. H. STATE NOSES 

OUT VARSITY 26-25 



ALL THE ACTS BEING PRE- 
PARED FOR AGGIE REVIEW 



Exciting Game Won in Last 30 
Seconds of Play. 

Saturday afternoon the varsity basket- 
liall team played New Hampshire Slate 

College on the Drill Hall ll ' liefore an 

entbaiiMtic CTowd of Alumni and 
undergraduates. The name was ex- 
ceedingly close all the way through, 
and with Aggie leading' at the half 
lime by two points everyone was on 
ih.'ir toes and ready for a tough haltle 
in the second hall. They saw one. 
With the score tied, and thirty seconds 
left to play a foul was railed and Perry 
ppad to the line. In ten seconds the 
gams ended with New Hampshire 
ahead '20-25. It was a clean game 
throughout and a food team won. 
Boser, Smith, and Hale played the game 
.il their lives. Hale's line work is ably 
illustrated by (be fact that Butler, New 
llainpshires' star foiward, scored but 
one basket throughout the game. An 
demon, Perry, and Craig played well 
li.i he winners 

Kuser and Perry started the scoring 
by caging fouls for their respective 
teams. After a few minutes of hard 
play Perry ami liutler in succession 
Mined for New Hampshire. Perry's 
two fouls and his basket from tloor were 
all that the visitors got in the next few 
minutes while Aggie ran up eight 
points. .Smith scored twice from the 
floor and Thompson once, while Uoser 
contributed two more points on fouls. 
The second basket which .Smith scored 
eat the most sensational of the year. 
"AI" ran down the floor and underneath 
I he basket. The pass came late and he 
sad to catch the ball over toward the 
Sine from which point be tossed 
Continued on p»g* 8 



PRIN. A. E. STEARNS 

COMING FEB. 13 

\i Sunday Chapel, Feb. 13, Prin. 
d Krnest Stearns of Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover, will be the speaker. 

Mr. Stearns was graduated from 

Phillips Academy in 1800 and in 1S04 

In- graduated from \mherst College 

• i^ht years later received the-A. M. 

Horn his Alma Mater. He has 

been honored with the degree of A. M. 

Vale, received fa 1915 and L.L.D. 

D him in 1912 by Dartmouth Coi- 

Ambersl again honored him in 

> coulerring the degree of L.H.D. 

Mr. Stearns taught from 1894-97 in 

own. l'enn., and afterward was a j 



Rising of Curtain on Feb. 18 will Re- 
veal Much New Talent. 

On Friday evening Feb. 18, at 7 o'clock 
in Howker Auditorium, "The Aggie 
Review"' will be staged under Ihe man- 
agement of the Bolster Deleters. The 
evening promises huge development in 
drama and music. The class commit- 
tees have been working hard for the last 
week in an effort to make the show a 
success, and insure its installation as a 
permanent institution. Kach of the 
regular classes, the two-year course 
and the faculty are represented in an 
act of approximately 20 minutes. 

The seniors are working on a musical 
piogiam in which the following men 
will take part, P. B. Armstrong, Jona- 
than Smith, Nathan (iillette, Robert 
Stat key, K. It Newton, Howard Uoff, V 
K. Lincoln, P. J. Caseio. K, K. Ilaslan, 
Francis Fletcher, Uussell Baker, < harlcs 
\nderson, Lawrence P. Martin, Robert 
L. Jones, Donald <'. Douglas, and K. V. 
Labrovit/.. 

The lass of '22 will present a bright 
comedy "His Methodist Foot. The 

cast includes the following: 



ADELPHIA APPOINTS 

STUDENT COMMITTEES 



Hook Agent. 
Mr. Jones, 
Mrs. Jones. 
Sally Jones, 
Hobby Jones, 
Mrs. Hurke, 
Mrs Stubbs, 
Mrs. Lane, 
Mrs. Johnson, 



George Alton 

K. M. Hodgson 

K.- N. Dolman 

K. G. Burnhain 

< . F. Whilaker 

Myron Murray 

11. A. F.rysian 

George Packer 

Fred Cook 



Undergraduate Groups to Cooperate 
with Faculty and Alumni. 

At a meeting of Adelphia held Sun- 
da) aliernoou. Feb. 0, three student 
committees were appointed to discuss 
and act OB certain college affairs of in- 
leiest to the whole sludenl body, these 
coiumiticcs lo act in conjuction with 

similar coi ittees from the Faculty 

and alumni. As yet they have taken 
no action. The primary purpose of the 
plan is to bring together the ideas ot 
all these bodies, so closely related to 
affaire OB the campus, and to further 
I be spirit which Prexy voiced at the 

ireai In biswatebwoid " Aii-togeiher." 

The committees are: — 

General Celebration Committee for 

Semi-centennial : 

Nathan W. Oillet te,'21 \ Jonathan H. 
Smith, "21: Albert W. Smith, '22; Roger 
B. Friend. It; Richard B. Smith. '24. 

Committee on Student Organizations 
ami Courses of St udy : 

C. Donald Kendall. '21; Starr N. 
King. '21- Richard A. Mellen. '21: 

Emeraoa F. Baalnm, '21; Oarlyle H. 

Gowdy, '22; Frederick V. Waugh, '22; 
Wilbur H. Marshman. '23. 
Committee on SI udenl Activities : 
Lawrence P. Martin, '21; Charles G. 
Mackintosh. '21 : (ieorge W. Kdinan,'21 ; 
Lorenzo Fuller. '21; Helding F. Jack- 
son, '22; lieslie D. Rent, '22; James A. 
Ileal, '88. 



ALUMNI DAY SEES RETURN 
OF MANY OLD GRADS 



The Sophomores have prepared a 
musical act. A quartet which includes 
Urod trick, Richards. Rennett. and N or- 
cross will give two selections. Two in 
strumental selections will be rendered 
by Sears, Norcioss, Fuller and Wendell. 
ToWttS and Ruell will provide a banjo 

duet. 

The freshmen are presenting 'Swim- 
mtn' Pools," a romance in one act by 
Forrest Bedford. The cast includes: 
\- ut Charles Tewbill 

Knglisb. K. (i. Rowes 

Kid. W.f. Frost 

Sheriff, J- I- Wil>''"'»* 

j| an K. <L (.oldsmith 

The two year Diamalic Club will 
present the sketch "Marriages are made 
in Heaven-and Elsewhere'' by Graham 
Price. The scene is laid in the interior 
of a rectory in the County Monaghan. 

Characters: 
Patrick Reilly. Stanley Blisfa 

Michael Reilly Fred Margrene 

Mrs O'Connor, K.therine 1 owe 

Hto Nora Grady, Elaabeth Bveeell 

The faculty is preparing a very clever 



STUDENT FORUM AT 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY. 



Several Topics Productive of Dis- 
cussion. 



Adelphia, represented by President 
chariest;. Mackintosh '21, conducted 
a Student Forum in Assembly last Wed- 
nesday, February 2nd The first ques- 
tion brought before the student body 
Vis that of a Wednesday Assemblies. 
As tliere was no discussion on this sub- 
ject Mackintosh briefly outlined the aim 
of these assemblies and pointed out 
that much benefit was derived from the 
many good speakers which Prexy 
brought before us. 

The next subject brought before the 
assembly was the Kbit ion of Student 
Managers. In order that the student 
body should know exactly how student 
managers were elected in the past and 
at present. Professor Hicks was called 
upon He sketched the differences in 
the methods of electing student mana- 
gers when he first came to M. A. 0, and 
play- i how it is done now. Professor Hicks 
s 'The Ris- deplored the fact that so few men com- 
and has already peted for the position of student mana- 



nt at the Andover Theological, 

urn and instructor at Phillips one act play by t he famous 
Academy from 1897 to 1900. After , wright, Lady Megory 

g the position of registrar and j in* ^^JJJJJ^ fanie . The parts | 
i' tor for the next two years, he reacneo «t cu. = 
tads vice-president of the Acade- j aw taken as follows: 
and in July, 1903 was, made princi- \ i* 6 **"***}! 



Prof. John Pbelan 



Andover, a position which 



The Ballad Singer. Prof. C.H.Tbompaon 



was a credit to the man and meant a 
great deal to the institution. It is im- 
portant that a manager have business 



Policeman X. 



ability, a good personal appearance 
Continued on p»f» T 



Memorial Building to be Finished 
May 1, 1921. 

Over 130 Alumni registered for the 
two Alumni Days, last Friday and Sat- 
urday. Friday morning was spent visit- 
ing classes and in committee meetings. 

The committee on administration met 
with President Buttertield Friday morn- 
ing in a session which lasted three 
hours. The president tirst explained 
the scope of the college. He defined 
tbe institution as a "food supply col- 
lege". Here, also an attempt is made 
to lay the foundations for the develop- 
ment of a satisfying country life. The 
president then outlined tbe projected 
building plan, and told of the complex 
intricacies of action between the 
authorities at Boston and those in im- 
mediate charge of the college at Am- 
herst. He also explained the recent 
serious losses in the personnel. 

The Alumni committee on adminis- 
tration had the following members 
present: Joel K. Uoldthwaite '8ft, Fred 
C-tiggs 13. W. A. Miiiihoii '0ft, R. F. 
Richardson 'H7. Philip Whitmore '16 
and (linton King '07. 

The committee on student activities 
met with the president also. At ibis 
gathering the undergraduate activities 
on the campus were discussed witb tbe 
view of getting, through coordination, 
truly effective student life, with tbe 
power to carry away traditional in- 
fluence and significance. 

President Butterfield again addressed 
tbe alumni at a meeting Saturday 
He asserted tbat the work wbicb tbe 
"old grads" are doing is helping the 
administration a great deal in unravel- 
ing the red tape which is now so prev- 
alent in tbe relations between Boston 
and Amheist. He congratulated the 
alumni on their support and enthusi- 
asm, which they have freely given. He 
reported failure to get increases hi 
salaries, and slated tbat many pro- 
fessors and others of tbe instruction 
staff are leaving M. A. C. for places 
where a 60% higher salary is paid them. 
He urged tbe need of adequate informa- 
tion shout the college for tbe people of 
Massachusetts. 

Two new forms of membership to tbe 
alumni were adopted. The first is a 
sustaining membership wbicb necessi- 
tates an annual payment of $10, and tbe 
other an endowment membership which 
requires the payment of a lump sum of 
$100. Tbe question of having a mem- 
bership fee based on a certain per cent 
of what tbe tuition at M. A. C. would 
be wers it not free, was refered to the 
executive committee. $100 would be 
taken as a tuition basis. 

Dr. Brooks '7S reported tbat tbe $300 

appropriated prior to the war for the 

erection of a grandstand on Alumni 

Field, has been turned over to tbe atb- 

i letic department. Mr. Munson stated 



f 






The Massachusetts Collegia o, Wednesday, February 9, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 9, 1921. 



that the recenl membership drive in 
Boston netted I8fi members. 

The Memorial Huilding contractor 
staled that the building will be com- 
pleted May 1. Interior plastering has 
started, and the interior woodwork will 
be under way in three weeks. The 
(tirDisbtogI for the different rooms will 
be left to the omaiiizatioiib concerned. 
The following men were elected to the 
Memorial Building Management Cora- 
iniitec: KnosJ. Montague '16, the farm 
superintendent here: R. H. Jackson 
»08, an Amherst merchant ; Sumner K. 
I'arker '04, county agent leader and 
Kvan It. Uichardson '87. 

At the meeting of the alumni inter- 
ested in non-athletics Saturday morning, 
D.an Patterson unfolded a plan where- 
by all athletic ami non-athletic re- 
hearsals etc., would be arranged accord- 
to a tixetl and deliuite schedule. The 
alumni interested in athletics met and 
discussed the athletic situation at 
Ag«ie. In all the meetings, the alumni 
talked over the old traditions and the 
opinion seemed to be in favor of more 
Btrennous >anquet scraps, and of imbu- 
ing the student body with the '"pep" of 
bygone days. 

FAST STEVENS FIVE 

DOWNS AGGIE 37-18 



AGGIE HOCKEYISTS 

TURN ON TUFTS 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 



Visitors Score Mostly in the Latter 
Part of the Game. 
On Thursday Bight the strong Steveus 
Institute hasketball team stopped in 
Amherst and defeated the M. A. 0. 
team by a :V7-1H score. The game was 
fast, both teams putting up a fine ex- 
hibition of play. The passiug of the 
home team featured their work, while 
the foul shooting of Acting Captain 
Bifflaj was the prominent tealure in 
the work of the New Jersey men. 

For rjuiie a time the only scoring was 
on fouls by BoMt and the Stevens man. 
Hoser scored the first basket for Aggie. 
Shortly after the middle of the game 
several of the Aggie team were put off 
the floor because of personals. This 
gave Hall, Hale, Clark, Alexander, 
Beal, Randall and Hooper a chance to 
get in the game. Ball and Uale played 
well for the short time they were in. 
Hale got one basket, a long shot from 
mid-floor, while Hall scored twice from 
beneath the basket. Marshman was 
the only regular to stay in the game. 
He took Uoser's place on the foul line 
and scored three times this way. He 
also scored two baskets from the floor. 
Near the end of the game he sustained 
a sprained ankle but gamely stuck 
through to the finish. 

The game was well contested through- 
out, although the visitors were always 
slightly in the lead until their final 
•OOftof period near the end of the sec- 
ond half. The work of Gowdy. Marsh- 
man, and Ball was the best for M. A. C, 
while Higley's all round work stood 
out in the visitor's play. Captain Eg(?er 
was forced to stay at home from this 
trip bei -ause of examinations. 
The lineup: 

STKVKN8 **• A. C. 

Kurtz. Mount, Helman, If If, Smith, Beal 

Uigley,rf 

rf, Koser, Ball, Hooper, Randall 
1'rovost, c c, Marshman 

Koth.rg lg, Gowdy, Hale 

Brune, Muller, lg 

rg, Thompson, Clark. Alexander 
Score-Stevens 37, M. A. C. 18. Goals 
from floor -Muller 3. Higley 2, Kurtz, 
1'rovost, Roth. Ball 2, Marshman 2, 
Boser, Hale. Goal* from fouls— Higley 
10, Kurtz. Rotor 3, Marshman 3. Ref- 
eree (iaiiand. Timer— MacLaughlin. 
Scorer— Bunker. 



Fast Offen»e Bolls Up 8-0 Score 
Against Brown and Blue. 

An 8-0 score was the best the Tufts 
seven could get in their lilt with Coach 
Mansell's team on the home rink Thurs- 
day afternoon. The game was one sided 
and rather slow on account of poor ice. 
The Aggiesdid not have to extend them- 
selves but at times they opened up with 
some real fast hockey. 

It was all Aggie from start to finish, 
the home team not only proving them- 
selves superior skaters but showing a 
better brand of teamwork. The Maroon 
and White collected five goals iu the 
first half but while Tufts strengthened 
her defense in the second period it was 
at the expense of her offense for Phil 
Newell was not called on to make a 

stop. 

Sonny Mausell started the scoring in 
the first period by carrying the puck 
down alone from the middle of the rink 
and pushing it cleverly past the goal 
tend. For the final goal of the game he 
duplicated this performance in an even 
more Brilliant rush. After the first 
goal four more came in quick succession. 
Collins caged one from a hot scrimmage 
in front of the goal; Mansell drove one 
into the net from over on the left wing; 
and Capt. McCarthy scored two more 
after receiving passes in front of the 
net. Soon after tne second half opened, 
Lyons netted the puck and a little later 
Poole Bcored on a pass from Mansell 
right to to the corner of the cage after 
the two had brought the puck down 
the ice together. It was the prettiest 
idece of teamwork of the game. 

Tufts never threatened seriously and 
rarely got the puck through the Aggie 
defense. Snow and Hutchings did the 
best work for the Brown and Blue, Her- 
eupon at goal had a busy afternoon and 
made several fine stops. The lineups: 
m. a. c. TUFTS. 

McCarthy, rw rw, Hartwell 

Lyons, Snow, c •» Snow 

Mansell, lw '*, Hutchings 

Poole, p P, Gage 

Collins, cp cp, Davidson 

Newell, g 8. Herculson 

Score-M. A. C. 8. Tufts 0. Goals- 
Mansell 3, McCarthy 2, Collins, Lyons, 
Poole. Referee-Davidson. Time— 20 
min. halves. 



Nash Block 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits* 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's 0ffice-$1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



A SPECIAL SUIT 

Single or double breasted in a cheerful brown effect, cut form-fitting, at $50 
for young men. Hand tailored— character in every curve. Individuality 
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144 Main Str Northampton 



FRATERNITIES HOLD 

ANNUAL BANQUETS 

The annual initiation banquets,of the 
different fraternities, were held last 
Saturday evening. The dates of the 
banquets were arranged this year, so 
that it came upon Alumni Day, with 
the result that much more significance 
was given them by having a large 
number of the older members back. 
The following banquets were held: 
Alpha Gamma Rbo, Draper Hotel, 
Northampton; Alpha Sigma Phi, The 
Perry; Commons Club, Draper Hall;, 
Delta Phi Alpha, Russell Inn, Hadley ; j 
Kappa Gamma Phi, at the house; 
Kappa Sigma,Rose Tree Inn, Northamp- 
ton; Lambda Chi Alpha, Draper Hall; 
Phi Sigma Kappa, The Davenport; Q. 
T. V., at the house; Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
Plymouth Inn, Northampton; Theta 
Chi, Plymouth Inn, Northampton. 

John H. Lockhart, ex-'22, has trans- 
ferred to the University of New York in 
order to take up a course in business 
economics. Harry A. Murray, '22, has 
succeeded Lockhart as a partner in the 
College Store. 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



— FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 




TRADE 



MARK 



MOST men prefer the pipe to any other form of smoking. 
There's comfort, contentment, real satisfaction and 
economy in a good pipe. WDC Pipes give you this, and 
more. A special seasoning process makes the genuine r rencn 
briar bowl break in sweet and mellow. Pick a good shape 
at your nearest dealer's, at your price. 

WM. DEMUTH 6i CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLD'S LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 



DOES AGGIE MEAN ALL IT SHOULD TO AGGIE MEN? 

You are not a real Aggie man unless you have eaten a 
few meals at a place whose name means all it implies. 

INN — A good place to stop between classes. 



VARSITY SEVEN BEATS M. I. T. 
BUT LOSES TO B. C. 



Both Games are Hotly Contested. 

The M. A. C. varsity sevt-n broke iU 
Bg streak when it defeated the M. I. 
T. team in the Boston Arena Tuesday 
night. Although Boston Oollojtfl <ar- 
I away the bacon M Monday eve- 
ninn by a score of I to 1 the AfJKieB 
CUM back with a vengeance and the 
recta players who had previously beaten 
!;. C. were forced to take the short end 
\A the same score on Tuesday. Both 
imes were thrillers but the B.C. |UM 
.1. unlay was probably the more sen- 
tatloaal. In this tilt two of the goals 
,iine on brilliant individual plays. One 
of these was by Frank Morrissay, who, 
Id the Am! period, captured the puck 
;i the center of the ice and alone car- 
ried It down the rink and shot it paM 
N.wcll. The other, which was one of 
Ibe outstanding features of the game, 
was by Capt. Justin McCarthy, and also 
line in the last session. "Jerry" 
snatched a loose puck from in from of 
I, Morrissey, in front of the B. C. goal 
and whipped it past Urban like a bullet. 
Th« other score of the fray, and which 
proved to be the wiuning margin, came 
in the second period. It was of the 
horseshoe variety, resulting llOOi ■ 
long shot which slid under Phil New- 
i'!l's skate. 

The game was the closest and hard- 

Ml fought which has yet been seen in 

\itna. Aggie put up a real battle 

bat whatever advantage there was in 

the play belonged to Boston and tb« 

i\id the verdict. The M. A. C. 

itna played a defensive game but B. C. 

broke through once too often. 

both goal tenders did some 8M0p- 

ti il work and ••Phil" Xewell dOMnrM 

runsiderable credit. "Phil" is a slat 
who has developed since entering 
kgfio and he now ranks well up with 
best. He made a number of bril- 
liant stops and his work even ex- 
celled that of Luke Urban, the famous 
B. C. athlete. Capt. McCarthy and 
"Sonny" Mansell, as usual, proved 10 
Augie's strongest players on the of- 
hnse. "Sharkey" Lyons also ligured 
minently. 
The lineups: 

BOflTOI (OI.I.KOE MASS. AoOlK 

Sanity, lw rw, McCarthy 

Carry, e c, Lyons 

Huuues, r r. Mansell 
H.-aly,rw lw, Snow, Gordon 

Morrissey, cp cp, Collins 

1 . Moirissey, p P. l ' oole 
Irl.an.g g, Newell 

-«,,re— Boston Collge 2, Mass. AfJtlM 
(ioals— Carrity, F. Morrisaey, Mo- 
by. Penalties— Hughes, tripping, 

2 , nintites; Healy, roughing, 2 mitm 
ices-George (Jaw and Bob Clifford. 

; umpires— Ralph Edwards and 

J >hn Larocca. Time— Three 15-mhiule 

>dg. 

tu the victory over M. I. T. Tuesday 

If, A. C. showed a stronger of- 

• than against Boston College and 

i in the final period put over the 

in 2 goal on a pretty play l,v Ma "' 

"Sonny" corraled the puck near 

'enter of the Arena, whisked the! 

• l down the left side of the rink, 

■\er toward the center and shot it 



past Nickle from close range. 

Both teams scored in the opening 
period and from then on it was any- 
body's game. Aggie forced the play- 
ing most of the time but could not score 
the needed point until the last minute 
of play, as already described. 

As in the B. C. contest the work of 
both goal tenders was of a high calibre. 
"Phil" Newell made several line stops 
but was hardly as busy as bis oppon- 
ent. Nickle was kept constantly on 
the jump by the Maroon and White 
forwards. Along with Capt. McCarthy 
and Coach Mansell, "Sharkey" Lyons 
played a strong game in forward line. 
Particularly on the defense he proved 
to be a ureal stumbling block to the 
M. 1. T. players. Collins aud Poole 
made a strong defense and broke up 
numerous Tech rushes. "Hubber" was 
also responsible for one of the Aggie 
scores. 

The teams played seven man hockey 
in the opening period and then out 
down the number to six in the last two. 
It is notable that two of the goals came 
iu the opener. M. I. T. scored first 
when Taylor caged the puck from a 
scrimmage 1b front of the net, but Col- 
lins soon lied the count on a shot which 
Nickle was only able to deflect into the 
net in attempting to brush aside. 
The lineups : 

MASS. Ai.OIKH M. X. T. 

.snow, Gordon, lw rw, Cauldell 




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Mansell, c 
Lyons, r 
McCarthy, rw 

( 'ollins, ep 
Poole, p 
Newell, g 
Score— Mass. 



c, 1). MacNeil 

r, Grant 

lw, Taylor. Delaney 

cp, Duvernet 

p, N. MacNeil 

g, Nickle 

Aggies 2, M. I. T. 1. 



(o.als -Collins. Mansell, Taylor. Pen- 
alt ies— Taylor, rottffhlog, 2 minutes; 
N. MacNeil. tripping, I minutes; Duv 
ernei, roughing, 2 minutes. Referees— 
Ravmie Skilton and Bob Clifford. Time 
ThrM l.Vmimite periods. 

SIDELIGHTS 

.lack Hutchinson saw both games 
and pronounced the Aggies the fastest 
team which baB played in the Arena 
this winter. 

Two boston papers gave the Aggies 
credit for being the most alert and 
keenest at following the puck of any 
team seen there this winter. 

Manager George V. Brown, of the 
Srena. was well satisfied with the M. 
\. ( . team and is willing to reserve 
other dales if games can be arranged. 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corners" 



Broadway 

al :uih St. 



Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren al 41st St. 

NKW YORK CITY 



APPOINTMENT OF 

WILLIAM E. SANCTUARY 

William K. Sanctuary M. A. C. '11 
has been appointed Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry al tbe Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Collefa to succeed Professor 
Loyal F. Payne who recently resigned 
to accept a similar position at tbe 
Kansas Stale Agricultural College. 

Mr. Sanctuary's home is in Amherst. 
He graduated from M. A. C. in 1912. 
and has had, in addiiion to practical 
farm experience, seven years experience 
as Instructor in Poulty Husbandry at 
the Stale Agricultural School al Morris- 
vine, N. Y., where he is at present 
Head of the Department of Poultry 
Husbandrv, and Vice-Director of the 

school. 

Mr. Sanctuary will lake up his duties 
at M. A. C, September 1, 1921. 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



KlTAII.ItlBli i una 

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ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



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VICTOR RECORDS 



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Fountain Pens 



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The M— <*««ett» Collegian, Wednesday, February 9, 1921. 



The Maaaachuaetts Collepian, Wednesday, February 9, 1921. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COUEdlAN 

Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Laukswcs P. Maktik '21. 

Robust L. Jo««s '21 M»n»gin* Edito, 

Associate Editors. 
Gaoaos w. Kdmak '21 

KKHMBTH A. BARNARD '22 

HTANI.IV W. BBOMLB* 22 

Haul I* Burnett '22 

Hobart W. 8prin« '22 
Bbi.dino F. Jackson '22 
John M. Whittirr'28 
L. B. ARRiNOToN '28 

Business Department. 

HBRRSRT L. 0»H '21. BwtneM Manner 

Kverrtt ('. Prmton '2t AdvsrtUlns Msn»«er 
CHARI.M A. Buck '22 OrcuUtlon Manager 

MYRON 0. MURRAY '22 

HOLDSN WHITTAKER '28 

OWEN K. KOLSOM '28 



that you Ret less than your share of 
smiles, less than yourghare of elections 
or less than your share of friends. Re- 
member this is not the heart of South 
Boston. You are M. A. C. ".en in Am- 
herst. You're here because you've 
been placed above the intelligence of 
"Mickey"' Schultz and his cronies. 
You're striviiiK for IWNH. Baet un- 
Rdttor-tn-Chlef 1 tidy habit which you cultivate hinders 
your upward climb. Let's pay atten- 
tion- you few men-AKKie wants a 
change. 



were incapable of staging a perform- 
ance of their own. To correct this false 
impression 1 wish to say that the show 
was abolished at the special request of 



PAPER CITY ENGRAVING CO., Inc. 



was aboiisueo ai iu« n,.cv,.<.. »~ M 

the Router n.-isters. it was abolished takers of High-grade Cuts tor all 

to relieve the unorganized class of the k j n( j s Q j Publications. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Maaaachuaetti Collegian. 

In ease of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as ••cond-class matter at the Amneret 
Poet Ofttce. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 1108. Act 
of October. 1917 suthortied August 20. 1918 



UnpkroraduatkAtiii.kticCommittkk 
Mass. Aoricutukai. Coi.i.kok: 
Gentlemen -.-The Amherst College 
Student Council wishes to extend to 
you its heartiest thanks for permitting 
the Amherst hockey and track teams to 
use your equipment. We are indeed 
very grateful to you for this privilege 
and hope, that should the occasion 
arise, you will call upon us without hes- 
itancy for a similar favor. 
Very truly yours, 

R. A. Clark, for the Council. 



H. I. 

What does the student body want t 
The Coi.kchan wants to get at the 
bottom of things. A newspaper is 
naturally printed for the ones who are 
to read it. The wants of the readers as 
a body are governed by "11. I" Hu- 
man interest is the thing that the news 
paper has got to cater to. A real live 
paper natinflen. 

Does the student body want a long, 
detailed account of athletics, or do they 
want a short, snappy account of ca.li 
game'.' If the latter is desired it gives 
the paper an opportunity to pat in a 
large number of smaller articles that 
are really neu-s. whereas, if a long, de- 
tailed athletic account is printed the 
readers perhaps led it monotonous. Is 
that not so? Why crab on the outside ? 
( nine inside some night when the 
board is convening anil tell your talcs 
of woe. What is wanted ; lengthy arti- 
cles with numerous details or short. 



norgan 
responsibility of an evening's entertain- 
ment, for often though a very good per- 
formance results from the efforts of the 
yearlings' nevertheless the event 
always carries with it a large question 
mark and sometimes undesirable fruits. 
On Friday, Feb. 18, instead of the 
scheduled Freshman Show there will be 
an Aggie Review, bringing before the 
footlights talent from every source pos- 
sible ; each class, the two-year, and the 
faculty. The object of the event is, 
firstly, to provide a refined entertain- 
ment for the students and the towns- 
people and, secondly, to give the Bolster 
Doisteri M insight into the future 
dramatic possibilities. 

Whether or not this event shall be- 
come an annual affair depends upon the 
support the students give it. From the 
standpoint of something worth while it 
deserves the backing of every last mem- 
ber of the college. This years event 

will be the test. 

Do you want an Aggie Review? If 
so, help your class put on a real, worth- 
while act and support it on the evening 
of Feb. 1H. Gkokok W. Human '21. 



RADCLIFFE BUILDING 

Phone 700 

Holyoke, Mass. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Fiae Wstch ■•psirind. also Broken Leaaei 

Replaced 1'romntl.v. 

32 Mala Street. Amherst. Mate. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



South Boston P 
A hundred and fifty alumni came 
back to the campus last weekend. 
Quite a number commented upon the 
slack appearance of the Btudents. Sev- 
eral graduates even went to the Coi.i.k- 
oian and asked the reason for the slop- 
piness of the men on the campus. It is 
not confined to any group, either. It is 
noticeable in all classes. Let's match 
It up. Aggie men should want to ap- 
pear neat as well as other men. 
Neatness does not mean flashy dress; 
just a common-sense amount of lidy 
dreBS is all that is asked for. Clothes 
don't make a man, but sloppiness never 
yet has helped a man. What is your 
opinion of a man who wears dirty, im- 
pressed trousers, never-brushed shoes, 
dirty shirt and dirtier collar, hair which 
is seldom combed aud perhaps an old 
cap or hat dirty as sin? Perhaps he 
has to wear old clothes. All right ; 
but it is in any man's power to keep his 
clothes clean. A few second's each day 
just to brush or clean will make, in 
many cases, a new man, or at least a 
fifty per cent change. Don't get the 
Idea that I think clothes make a man. 
That is not so; but when a certain num- 
ber of men from each class persist in 
making themselves disagreeable aud 
often disgusting, it is time for you men 
referred to, to sit up and take notice. 
Even the alumni in one day notice it. 
They want to know if this is a college 
or a state penitentiary. Let's show 
them that it is a college. Some of you 
men who are sloppy in your dress, 
think it over and try to decide why it is 



snappy articles full of MWlf 

COMMUNICATIONS 

In regard to the discussions of ex- 
emptions from final examinations that 
have appeared as communications in 
the Coi.i.koian for the last two weeks, 
it is probable that most of us regard 
what was said in the last issue about 
the benefit of final examinations to the 
student as applicable at least to major 
subjects. Certainly for the stm lent to 
obtain the maximum from the courses 
that he has chosen as the most inter, 
esting and likely to be the most help- 
ful to him in bis post-college life, the 
tinal examination should be given. 

However, there is a different situation 
existing in the first two years when 
courses are required and literally foreed 
down the students t hroats. Here there 
are courses in which the student will 
have very little interest except in a 
general way. Now many of these 
courses are made as difficult as possible 
in order that the student will have to 
do extra hard work in order to get by. 
and there is very little encouragement 
for high standing. Of course in this 
case, the student wants to get over 00ft 
in order to pass the course and get rid 
of it as he would a bad cold, but the 
only incentive to high scholastic stand- 
ing in such a course is the hope of being 
excused from the final examination. 

As the student, during his freshman 
and sophomore years, strikes several 
such courses, his altitude toward them 
being governed by his individual pre- 
dilections and by the personality of the 
instructor, it would be only fair for ex- 
emptions to be allowed in all required 
subjects for these two years. 

s. w. 1$. 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF 

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENTS 

in a Statement of the Finances of the 
Athletic Department from July 1, MHO 
to Dec. II, 1»20, it is interesting to note 
that there was a deficit for the past 
year of nearly $2,000. The Department 
has been working under diihculiies and 
accounts for this deficit in two ways. 
One is the fact that athletic equipment 
bM risen in price 200% to 300%, the 
Student tax haB increased only 50%, 
and again the number of students has 
increased by only about 100 in the past 
three or four years. The report in de- 
tail follows: 



SELECT CATERING 

— at — 

Reasonable Prices 

mrs- Cassiii 

Tel. 566-M 

12 SOUTH PROSPECT STREET 
Amherst, Mass. 



HKCKIPTB. 

General funds *3463 37 



Football 
Track 



3723 62 

148 77 



$7335 76 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A. 0. Men 

Next Assembly, FRIDAY, Feb. 11,at8p.m. 

Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



PAYMKNTS. 

General Funds. 
Sweaters 
Coaching salaries 
Printing 
Telephone 

Laundering of equipment 20 84 
Office supplies 20 «7 

Field repair and mainte- 
nance 
General equipment to 
sell or use 

General medical sup- 
plies 

Medical services 

Advances 



*4i9 06 

600 00 

79 08 

52 33 



234 79 
420 98 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

CATERING. FOK 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At KRATKUMT1B8EVKKY NIGHT 



Miscellaneous 



Football 
Baseball 
Hockey 

Track 

Basketball 



286 71 

116 00 

75 00 

49 70 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men taught to lead by quickest methods 
Intiulric* ml MM* Studio, 

V. O. Building. 1>h " ne ' 



$2384 16 



$6048 52 
72 32 
»1 08 

:W4 22 

292 89 



The Aggie Beview. Why P 

In justice to the Freshman class it is 
only right that an explanation be made 
concerning the abolishment, this year, 
of the Freshman Show. When the an- 
nouncement was made Home lime ago 
in Assembly that the Freshmen could 
not put on a show, the idea was mis- 
construed to mean that the FreBhmen 



Total payments $9283 14 

Total payments $0283 14 

Total receipts 7335 7° 



Net loss 



$1947 38 



A plan for Bible discussion groups is 
being formulated whereby the students 
will direct the discussions themselves. 
This plan will be announced at a future 
date. 



l_OW PRICES 

— ON— 

Silk Hosiery 

"Phoenix," $1.10 and $1.95 pr. 
" Gordon," 98c and $2.19 pr. 

All qualities in 

BlacK, White or Cordovan. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

Suits Pressed, 65c 

on Sanitary Pressing Machine 

LABR0V1TZ,11 Amity Street 



'(So) , 




u 



FOK THE WIDE-AWAKE 

OI T iiuiy go to *l«M'i> in Church, hut WuInIi nt-vrr ftOM to sleep 
on the latest styles or u«»w erestions of «ln i ss. 

TRUST WALSH AND WALSH WILL TRUST YOU 

REST BY TEST 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 

TEAM WINS TWO GAMES 



Amherst High and Williston Fall by 
Large Scores. 

The Williston basketball team was 

kepi twenty pointi from a win by tot 
rapid pass work and perfect team work 

of t he fast Freshman live, last Saturday 

afternoon la Kaathamptoa, by i teen at 

_':>-4. During the tirst halt. Williston 
was not able to score, and the in^li- 

men played rings around her, the halt 

ending 104) In favor of the Freshmen 
the Kicslimeu were outweighed by the 
luavy Williston live, but I hey did tin in 
up blOWn, just I be same. 

Weather wax, playing riyht guard i<>i 

the Freshman, was the star lefence. 

Harrows who substituted for Kane, la- 
lured in the tirst halt, at right forward, 
played good ball ami tied with Barker 
in the number of Moor baskets. The 
1 1 neaps i 

li'L'4 Will, IS I (IN \c Mil MS 

Kane, barrows rl ly. ( hariiei 

Kerranii, If rg, Zimmerman, Strong 

Barker, e e, O'Longnlla 

Weaiherwax. rg If, I'enshoii, Manner 

Hike, lg (capt.) rf, Sheldon (capt.) 

Goals from floor: Barrows :i, Ferranti 

2, Barkers. Hike. Sheldon. Moaia from 

Iniils: Kerranii .">. < 'hart ier •>. Referee: 
Finn. .Score: ISM SB, Williston — 4. 



The Preen men defeated the Amberal 

i school in basketball last Tlinrs- 

daj evening after the varsity game 

with a 55-18 More. While I lie name 
w.is exceedingly onesided, it showed 
the Freshman learn at i t k best and al 
the height Of its season. The learn 
Rave a line exhibition ol team work. 
Kane, hooped several good shuts. 

Kane has proved one <>t the beat tally 
makers thin season for the freshman 
team, and upheld his reputation In tins 

game with seven Moor baskets. Ft r- 

rant! scored 16 out of 17 fouls, in the 

half, Ferranii scored 7 out ot '•>, 

B the second half, he scored on 

al! eight free tries. 

Weatberwax at ri^ht guard, was 

ton the spot, and broke up many 

"t the high school formations which 

threatened to score. Taelineupe: 

IW4 AMitntM in*. ii 

Kane, Harrows, Hartlett. rf 

lg, 11. B. Brown, H. Brown, Judge 
f* rranti, If ru, Jack, Dowd 

'. Kane. Barrows, c c Fish 

N I itheiwax, Hairston, rg, 

If, Judge, Walsh 
Bike, Hrunner, lg, rf, Sullivan, (capt.) 
■als from floor: Kane 7, Harrows 4. 
lett, Ferranti S, Barker 4. Hike 2, 
Walsh, Sullivan 2. Goals from loiils: 
unti 15, Sulivau 7. Referee: Gar- 
land. Score: 1024—55, Amherst bigfa 
IS. 



Boreen Of the K. O. T. (,'. Cavalry 
have recently been named after 



j"Ki, 



liletes and professors of M. A. C 
Gore, "Has" Pond, "Bed" Mur- 
Bob" Holmes, Pnrf. Hicks, "Billy" 
'tick, and '"Hull'* Prince illus- 
he general idea. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

JINX BROKEN AT LAST 



Varsity Relay Quartet Trims Granite 
State at B. A. A. 

The Aggie relay team "brought borne 
the bacon" from (bell recent week-end 

trip, as was apparent to all who beard 
the chapel hell being wildly rung bj 
an ambitious Freeh man el l_' SO on Sun- 
day morning. The jinx ibai has fol- 
lowed M. A. C teams, when playing 

against New Bampabirefoi the last two 
years, hae flaall) been broken. Before 

a large crowd at i be b a. I meet al 
Boston, i he r< la.\ team decisively de- 
feated the New Hampshire four, thua 
retrieving the bard fought game loal lo 
her at Amherst in the aft era I, 

Sullivan, the lead-ofl man for tggie, 
fairly leaped to the front wltb the gun. 
Before Sogers, \< e> Hampebire's lirsl 

man, woke up, "Sully" was rounding 
the lnsl bank with a lead of len yards, 
This lead kept Increasing until, on 
banding over the baton to kfacCready, 

he had a lead of over Jl) yards. "Mac, '* 
with his usual form, ran a tine race 
gaining 20 more yards on Draper. Nee 
Hampabire'a second man. Allen, run- 
ning thiid attains! Lagasoe, eaaily held 
the lead that had been gained, while 
Woodwoith, running anchor man. took 
tbinga easy and let Paine, bin opponent, 
gain about 1(1 yards, leaving a wide 
margin for the finish. The time lor the 
race was 11.57, a slow lime, due lo the 
fact thai the Hack was Bg yards longei 

than a mile. The race wa-- lacking in 

the usual excitement, owing to the big 
lead gained a. I he tirst. and may I" 
considered literally as a walkaway. 

Slate '21 put Up a fl i race in i he 

handicap mile, finishing second, lag 

Held of over 80 be passed all bui a H. <'. 
man, the latter. wilh 40 yards handicap. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wins i ■.!> \ ^ . Ki it. !i. 

I 00 i . m. Hockey , M. A. ('. vs. Am- 
herst ai Pratt BJak. 

6-SO r. M - V. M. C \. Discussion 
tiioup Meeting, Stoekbridge 
Hall. 

son p. m. Freshman basketball, m. 
a . 0, vs. A inhere! High, at 
High School Gym. 

Till ItSliAY, Fk.ii. 10. 

7 ho r. m. tiiec club Uebeareal, 

Stoekbridge. 

7-00 t>. m. Bolster Doieter Rehearsal, 

French Hall 

I'ltlDW. FKII. 11. 

7-40 \. vi. chapel. 

- 00 e. m. Basketball, M. \. 0. vs. 
< !onn, a . c at Biorre, Conn. 

7-oo r. m. Basketball, ISM vs. ISS1, 

l'.<_':t vs. 2-Year, al Drill Hall. 

t \u i: I > v % . Fl-.li. IS. 
2-00 I'. M. Hockey, M. A. < . v. I'.osloii 

College at M. A. C. 

i- m Basketball, M. A. < . \s 
Wesley an at Hlddletown, 

Conn. 

St RDAT, Fl it. IS. 

'.i-oo \.m. Sunday chapel, speaker, 
M i . a Ifrad l'.. steal us. I'lin 
clpal oi Phillips tcademy, 
a adover. 

Mohoay, Fi is it 

A. M. Chapel. 

Tl ISK.W, Ff II S. 

7-oo I-. vi. Senate Meeting. 

7oor.M. Bolster Doister Rehearsal, 

French Hall. 
7 l.'i I'. M, Pomology Clul. Meeting, 

French Hall. 



Was Your Ancestor Z Mayflower ? 



VOI siuot'IT) SEE 



The Pageant of the Pilgrims 



— \T — 



STOCKBRIDGE HALL 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY II, 1921 



AT 8-00 P. M. 



Tickets at Millett's 



75c, 50c, 25c 



WKDHItaDAT, fll, HI. 

8-00 F. M, \ssembly: .speaker, J'ro- 
tessor C. K. Marshall, M. V.c. 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other food tlilhtfii to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Mreet. CM U*-W) iiadiey, mui. 



S. S. HYDE 

< » i »t i«.>if i • i luwi Jowvoicna 1 

B PtasaSBi Street > n|> mie lltglif. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 

AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 



PO ll| « . Oil l oilrccl 



N0V1CK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

\c:it ly ami prompt J iloiie. 

v.' ,,;. called foi and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 I'lt-nsniif St. 



lei. 9 J 



I (t| n,i i |] < olombta < iile 



AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 
WHILE YOU WAI'I 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - Mass. 



S 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 






^.. m h IMf tt« Collegto, Wedn^d^Febrnary 9. MM. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 9, 1921. 



1NTERFRATERN1TY RELAY 

SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED 

Interfral.'imi.y B»I») starti rVi.niary 
lniiinl fr-.n present Indication- U stp- 

pwi .ha. lean will i.i- latMaattng 
raoaaduriag taa eoaatnaj Maaoa. All «-. 

the fraternities have | 1 'earns ami 

BO combination as yet looks unbeatable. 
lOlIOWlBgBTC tl>t' rules for this season: 

t— Any man nol on the varsity relay 
s,|.ia«l and b«tng a ...ember or pledga 
OJ any fraternity is , li-ihh U> run on 
,he teams representing that fraternity. 

2 All teams must rep"" to MeAnl'e, 

Mosely. or Kroeek with four B»M 



TOWN HALL 



TL „ J„„ I Eric Von Stroheim'e mai 
lnUrSflay I .lye s-reel roDer production. 
"The Devil's Pan Key. 
arltn a Double cast. One o 
its big production* of tne 
N ,..,, p a , i- you'll think 
you're there 1 Parte, tne wick- 
ed.and Put*, tbe w©n«rful 



Hat. at 3 

Eve. -' abowi 

6-45.8-30 

fllllKS: 
Mai. 17e. 2?C 



£. t*.5U I New.. Topics. Mutt and Jeff 



Friday 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Bebe Daniels and JatK 
Mulhall m "You Never Can 
Tell." I'nil of lit'' * n0 l "' 1 '' 

with never » 'I"" roent. 

thi» iton "' : <" up-to-date 
Cinderella pa< ki more 
dj ■mil laughter, and idiiuani 
situations Into 6 reete than 
: ,„v other picture In man* •' I 

BOOK. 

Scenic reel "GinRhaml 
Girls." ■• reel HacK Sennett I 

Bryant » WatlktlB , »nd 
SatlirdaV Wanda Hawley in Mrs. 
Temple's Telegram.' * 
tbe celebrated play. lf»onf 
long lingering langb. 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. -f Hbotm 

6-45.8-30 



Monday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



"The King of the Circus" 
News Comedy 

Douglas HacLean and 
Doris Hay In "Let's be 
Fashionable." Theaeclevei 
. haven't mte»ed a sten 
since their I'n-t Ms '"'• '-'•'- 
Moms' Leave." 
Pathe Review. I reel Comedy 



promptly at the time specHied. Any 
,„.„„ fal ,i aa to do so will forfeit the 

race. 

;j Postpone. I raees muni he run OB 
tb. next .late of scheduled raees OB 
Whicb -either lean. Las I s.-h.-dtded 
,,,.,. Postponed raees will loHOW 
•obBdulod raees, the lint! 10 beam at 
;, 16 and others a. HO, 5-25, etc. In 
cft »eol both teams wishing, to post,,u.e 
, r . u . t . BOtlOB »M»b« U'ivento MeArdle. 
Mosely. or Kroeek hefore Feb. 11. MB. 
4_ No iplkod shoes to he worn daring 

tbfl race. 

;, Members of the varsity squad will 
he allowed to represent their respective 
lnil( . niil ics after. he varsity schedule is 

completed. 

Following is the schedule lot t»e 
coining season : 

Fl.li. IS. 

Kappa (iainnia Phi vs. Theta < 'hi. 
Signs Pbl KBBltoB vs. Lambda ( hi 

Alpha'^ma Phi fB. Alpha (iamma 
Who. 

fkb. n. 

Kappa .simna vs. Alpha (Jatnuia BBO. 
<} T. V. vs Pbl 8lgm» Kappa. 

Lambda Obi AlpbB vs. Alpha Si-ma 

Phi. 

I I.I!. IS. 

phi Sigma Kappa vs. Kappa (.a.nn.a 

Pbl. 

-I'beiat hi vs. .siyma Pbl Kpsib.n. 
l^. T. V. ?8. Kappa Siuina. 

FSB. 24. 
Kappa S. -ma vs. Alpha Sigma PM. 

o I' V go. Lambda Cbl Alpha. 

Pbl SigBMI K:iPl>a vs. Alpha t.am.na 

Bbo. 

Fi.it. 2f». 
Pbl Sigma Kappa vs. Theta Chi. 
Kappa Sigma n. Kappa Gassnna Phi. 

< v >. T. V. vs. Blgma l'hi K|>silon. 
Mvtt.ii :'. 



Shorn 
Rmomlrlng 



T. MIENTKA'S 



—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

II Pleasant St., A in beret, Mass. 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 1 i Come j^ Aggie Me n ! 

Snoc Here's your chance to piek 

up some real Bargains in 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and_styles of slioes. 
You can't afford to miss this SAI.K! 
Also Eapert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on your way up town. 






JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKALKRH IN 

DRV AND FANCY GOODS 
. Ra<rs SuitCases 
Trunks Ba S s 



MARSH'S SANIFAKY 



Students' Furniture 

RUUS AND CARPETS 

- K. I) MAK8II KSTATK- 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



— AT 



Economy Prices 
E. ML BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 

HENRY ADAMS & GO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs. Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst. - Ma »- 



-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 



Kappa Grant P*i vs. Lambda CM 

Alpha. 
Tbett Cbl v>. Alpha Qsmms Bbo. 
Bigma Pbl Bpallontra. Alpha ^i^'"" 1 ' 1 "- 
M Man B. 

Kappa Sigma «s. Sigma 1M,i EP» ,too - 
o. T. V. ra. \l|'l>;> Wftms Pbi. 
Phi Sigma Kappa »*. Lambda Cbl 
alpha. 

M \i:< u 10. 

Phi Sigma Kappa »s. Wg»»B Pbi Bp 

.... 

Kappa Sigma ra. I.a..,.la<'bi Alpha. 
Q. T. V. vs. Kappa GaaiBia PM. 

Mai;< h ift. 
Kappa Oamma Pbi fa. Alpha Sigma Pbl. 
Tbe. a Cbl vs. Lambda Cbl Alpha. 
Sigma I'bi EpalloB vs. Alpha Gamma 
Bbo. 

mmicii n. 
Kappa Gamma vs. ThataCht. 
i » T. V. vs. Alpha Gamma Bbo. 
Pbl Sigma Kappa vs. Alpha Btgma .'bi. 

mai£< ii n. 

Kappa Gamma Pbl vs. Alpha Gamma 

Bbo. 
Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Kappa Mgma. 

Q.T. V. vs. Theta Cbl. 

M via u 84. 
i Kappa Gamma Phi vs. Sigma Pbi Bp 

i sibtii. 

Theta Cbl ra. Alpha Blgma Pbl. 
Lambda Cbl Alpha ra. Alpha (.annua 

bbo. 



JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering plaea fet 

the real boBM OOOklBg aod 

oollega life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 



£ 



CORDUROY RIDING BREECHES, 

White Mcrcetized Oxford Soft-collared Shirts, 
Aeroplane Cloth Shirts, best thing in town, 
liest Grade Imported Heather Wool Sox, 



Now $6.00 

Now $3.20 

Now $3.60 

Now $1.25 



Special reductions on Felt Hats, Suits, Over- 
coats, Leather Coats, Sheep-lined Coats, etc. 

This is a good TIME and PLACE to stock up. 

P. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for 35 years. 



Profaaaot Gt«BB of tin? Library De- 
partment has racenllj prepared B new 
list .,1 books, reeentlj pr»«:nre«l . un.lel 

the subject Bacteatlooal Beadlag for 

Sunients. Tbe list, whicb may be ob- 

la loed Iron Mr. Graaa ai the Library,! 

COBtaim vvnrks by sueh authors as:. 
Praob Cane. Albert l'arker Pitch, 
I.u.l.er (iuliek. Willre.l (i.enfell, 

Bntofl Barton, and Abraham Lincoln. 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Farming history shows that over-production and low pricea 
one ye™r are almost invariably followed by much smaUer 
crops and higher prices the next. To the far-seeing farmer 
this means opportunity. While others wait, he acts. Ha 
plants; and when the rise comes his crops are grown. 
Do you see the situation in that light? 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers are ready to help, rhey ar a 
good fertilizers— formulated, mixed, _ ~" ~~~ ~ kJM< 

cured right. They'll not only give 
your crops a quick start, but they'll 
keep right on feeding them to suc- 
cessful maturity. The very best in- 
gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 

_,. ;„+„ TTAT U n •«•• crop. »•»• 

of manufacturing experience go into ^ ,,, growB# b . Dd ud, 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers. *<£ feed !t . sod ai» en- 

„ . ... .. „^ M riches nil for next crop. A 

Order now for Spring planting. IJ *D«rv9 reMO n»ble »ppltc»tlon of B. 
no dealer near you. write for the agency. Itf*^****,**. 

THE COE-MORT1MER CO., Inc. ^^^SHJSJSS 

B»b.i4iar, 01 Thr Americn Aprirultural Ckemiml C. book ^"^""'•J 1 ^, ?« 

51 Chamber* St. New York City tuueV gu«ges'tion». 



E.FRANK COES 

MmA * m m ' Req. U.S. Pat. Off. 

Fertilizers 

"Increase the yield of every H old _ 



»-»"-■ 
']~&* 



COLLEGE 
STORE 



a a o 



MENTION OUR NAME 

or show our card to F. M. Thompson & Son on all purchases 
of clothing or furnishings. Bring the slips to us and get 2* 
of the amount in trade. It works. We have granted a large 
number of students such a premium already. Why not try it P 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



JOHN KENDRICK BANGS IS 
SOCIAL UNION ENTERTAINER 



Main and Worthington Streets 

(Give •■ • trial/ 



If it's for HAT RENOVATING, 
GLOVE CLEANING or SHOE 
DYEING, CONSULT THE COL- 
LEGE SHOE -SHINE PARLOR 
BY THE AMER. EX. OFFICE. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Booka Fountain Pena 



C. F. DYER 



An Opportunity 

The dairyman today faces an unprece- 
<»(] opportunity to market nutri- 
li'ius, palatable milk products at a sub- 
staotlaJ and continued profit, provided 
lie carefully guards his operation costs, 
and protects bis product from those pre- 
ventable losses of quality which so often 
iily reduce tbe margin of his profits. 
The exceptional cleaning qualities of 



C/e<?/Ter jntf C/ejnser 



recognized by the agricultural col- 
- of the United Stales and Canada 
• inc peculiarly adapted to this need 
lie dairy industry, and for eighteen 
ra this cleanser has guarded tbe del- 

Icate oualitiea of sensitive milk prod- 
. thus saving a substantial margin 

©1 profit for tbe careful dairyman. 

An order on your supply house will 
convince you of the truth of these 
claims. 

Indian In circle 



It cleans clean. 



In everr pkg. 
The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



His Address Followed by Muaical 
Clubs Concert. 

The third Social Union entertainment 
of the term was held in the Bowka! 
Auditorium Stockbridge Hail, last Fri- 
day eveuing Feb. 4, at 7 o'elock.and was 
enjoyed by an audience of several hun- 
dred students and alumni, who had 
come back to Aggie to partieipate in the 
various alumni day gatherings. The 
program consisted of two entirely diltei- 
ent features. The first part consisted 
of an excellent humorous talk by John 
Kendrick Hangs, who has been termed 
"Tka Incorrigible Optimist." He may 
be recalled as being the author of "The 
Houseboat on the Styx." Mr. Baag'l 
definition of an optimist was "a man 
who sees best because he sees hopefully. 

The second part consisted of a eon- 
cert given by tbe Musical Ulnba. lack 
selection was excellently rendered, and 
both the Mandolin and Glee Clubs were 
encored lime and time at;ain. Kspe< - 
ially splendid performances were ren- 
dered by the quailel and bj LabTOVtll 
and Vinten, the musical stars of the 
clubs. "A Calamity," sung by tin- 
Glee Club was very good. The coneeri 
aud likewise the whole performance 
terminated with the singing of ' ton "I 
Old Massachusetts" by the combined 
clubs and the audience. 



When serving 

HOUSE PARTIES OR LUNCHES 

consult us. If you do not see 
what yon want in our display, 
tell us and we will make it. 




WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Continued from page 1 



and should be a credit to tbe college. 

Star King then volunteered that tbe 
chief objections to the manager system 
as it stands today is that a man com- 
pete for the position for three years 
and get nothing in the end. 

The third question which was brought 
up fer consideration was that of the 
honor system. To what extent shoud 
the Honor Council advertise the re- 
sults of it's work t Should the name of 
the expelled man be published'.' .Mel- 
leu '21, opened the discussion. He ad 
vocated that the name of tbe man ex- 
pelled be published in order that jus- 
tice should be done to every one. 
Cascio '21, suggested that the Honor 
Council publish in the Coi.i.koian 
the fact that a man was expelled, when 
tbe occasion rises, but nol to publish 
this man's nam*. The next speaker, 
Gillette '21, agreed with Cascio's 
suggestions and made a plea that no 
man expelled should be wronged by 
letting news of bis milfortune spread 
outside of the M. A. C. campus. Klafl 
'21, then explained chiefly for the bene- 
fit of the Freshman how the Honor 
System started at M. A. ('. and what a 
great deal its establishment meant to 
M. A.C. The last speaker on the sub- 
ject, Lent '21, suggested that if a man 
cribbed and was expelled that BOtfctng 
else should be said. He stated thai 
there is no necessity for publishing 
that mans nam*. The dishonor Natl 
solely with the man himself and is no 
oueelses business. 

There was no discussion on the Din- 
ing Hall question so that subject was 
dropped. The forum closed with Ken- 
dall's outline of the Senate's position 
on regard to student questions. The 
Senate is an organization which is glad 
to take up any student grievances, and 
the only way the Senate has of obtain- 
ing public opinion is to obtain campus 
complaints. 



W. B. DRURY 

io Main Street. 

WIUGLI 

8£ a packaaa 
1 Before the Wo r 

5C • racfcaat 
1 During the War 

aaf 

9 tmm NOW!! 

Tbe Flavor Lasts 
So Does the Priest 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



PLAZA 

Northampton . . Mane. 

GOLDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

When- the IScmI 

PHOTO- PLAY 



An- -Imiuii. 

Program changed daily except Monday 
and Tuesday. 

i ki D'M P. BELMOMT. IhMltr. 




Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., t4 Hamp." 



Cmndy Shop 



Soda Pmrlor 



BECKM AN'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton. 



Mmmmmohuoottm 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IflC. Northampton, Mass. 



An optleal ibop which meaearee up to tie- 
iiikrin-it rtanttarn <.i modern: eerrlce, ¥©0, 

r.in rely on oih skill ami good toetl In all 

optical matter*. 



our Art Department Im tilled with pfctorea 
ible foi the decoration of "fret" h o ne ee, 
/ or for btrthdai and weihlmu trlftn. Greeting 
i eai di for particular people. 



HARDWARE 

Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 












T he Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesda y, February 9 t Jl92L^ 

Hats That Sell Themselves 

That's what our Spring line of imported 
_ w English and Italian Borsalino Felts have 
beSdoing-to try one on is to bny one. We advise 
immediate action while we still have a raBgeai ■«* 
And just for fun we are closing out our DOBBS riAlb 
at $4.50--a regular gift price. 




V , *?3^ J 




N. H. STATE BASKETBALL 

Continued from page 1 



over hi* head with one luiixl and scored. 
New Hampshire trot three mow points 

and Smith again caged a basket for 

Aggie. 

The visitors scored seven points be- 
bore the home team -oi started in I lie 
Becond half. Boner ma<le several line 
tries underneath the basket which 
barely missed counting. Finally BoMt 
scored a foul and Hale shot a pretty 
basket from the center of the floor. 
New Hampshire scored foot points in 
the next ten minutes ami Aggie in- 
creased her score when BoMTfOl two 
floor baskets inside of a very few see 
„„,!.,. bight here, just when the extra 
tight was needed Coaeh to.re sent 



temity,one man from the non-frater- 
nity group, and one representative Iron, 
the co-eds. The second amendment 
Htated that the class historian in lb« 
, hl . future shall be elected lor the en- 
tire college year. 



ALUMNI 



B. F. Hubert *12, has recently been 
made Agricull ural Director of Tuskegee 



Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama. The Ru- 
ral gfetetaoer lot Bfoeember, 1180, ooa- 

lains an article in regard to Mr. Hu- 
bert's work, and the following comment j 
taken from the Or<in<jebttr<i Sun: 

"During his stay in this community 
Professor Hubert has conducted him- 
self in such a manner as to win the re- 
spect of people of both races and his 
leaving is the cause of regret on the 



part of numerous | pie with whom he 

has come in contact." 

•1H.— Theodore H. Keuniann, an in 

•tractor la agriculture in the Leominster 
High School, is on the campus dole* 
personal nnprovement work, lie spen* 
his Christmas vacation learning the 
practical side of poultry raisins; on a 
dock farm on U»g Island. He n»« 
intends to spend the month of January 
learning the theoretical side here. 



Marshman into the game. 



'Willie" 



had a poor ankle but his injection into 
the game was all the home team 
needed to give the last extra punch. It 
worked, lor in short order Smith went 
down and scored the basket that tied 
the count. The last foul has been de- 
scribed above. 
The score: 

M. A. 0. 

Hoser, rf 

Smith, If 

Thompson, c 

Gowdy, lg 

Beals, lg 

Hale, rg 

Ball, rl 

Marshtuan.c 



2 
4 

1 





1 







I 

» 



tt 
I) 




t) 
t) 

1) 



IcH \ I. 

13 

2 


2 





V II. State 
Butler, If 
Boo man, If 
Perry, rf 
Anderson, e 

Stafford, if 

Sherwood, lg 
Craig, rf 



nt 

1 
l) 

:» 

2 







8 
ti 






25 

TOT kl< 

2 

14 
6 
(I 
4 




| 8 26 

Umpire— Swallield ;ieferee,— (■iarland j 
timekeeper— MaeLaughlin; scorer 
Bunker. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

On May 11 the Short Course Winter 
School is planning to hold a reunion for 
all former short course winter students. 
The Semi-centennial Committee is ar- 
ranging as part of this year's jubilee pro- 
gram a"series of conferences on various 
agricultural subjects. The dales are as 
follow*: April <.» and 10, 'Agricultural 
Missions/' April Ki-14-15," Agricultural 
Education," April H-M-W, "Bural 
Schools," May <S-7, "Mass. Food Sup- 
ply," May 12-13-14, "Country Church." 
The Freshmau class held a meeting 
last Tuesday evening in Clark Hall. 
Amendments to the class constitution 
were voted upon and were accepted. 
The first was a provision whereby in the 
future, nominating committees will be 
made up of one member from each fra- 



Don't Guess at 
What Feed Is \ 



Scales arc used every- 
where, from drutf stores t > steel 
mills but they are no more imp u- 
ant anywhere than at the feed trough and 
behind the cows in the dairy barn. A daily rec- 
ord of feel consumption aiid milk prodiu-ti >n is 
necessary for intelligent feeding. Weigh the feed 
you are now feeding. Weigh the milk you get Put 
down each day, for each cow, what the feed costs il d 
what the milk brings. 



BUFFALO 



CORN 

GLUTEN FEED 

■asi s^sr^ grig 5; 

P m x u with wheat bran or other mill feeds, oats, etc. 
Mak • - he Buffalo Corn Guitkn FKBD one-third, one- 
half or more of your mixture. Then feed this mix- 
ta , to yo« cows, each cow according to ^ her 
production, but give every cow enough to show 
1 What she can do with good feed when she gets 
a chance. Weigh eachcow'- feed. Then weigh 
her milk. A li le tiering will envvnee 
" you thit Itpvra t, feed Buffalo 
CornGlutkn Feed. 



J**.>' 



£ORN 

ISP 



Wr 
Corn I 

l/r.i r I 1 ' 



■;.,,, mixtures far feeding BUFFALO 

,/ y ,r,(,,,'r if yon would Hkc one. If 

,1^ tell u* whoand when hi /'■-•. 



THE FEED 
THAT MAKES THE YIELD 



L 



Coi'n Products Refining Co. 

New York Chicago ^ J 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 



Vol. XXX1. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 16, 1921. 



No. 15 



FORMER MEMBER OF 
FACULTY PASSES AWAY 



Major Martin, for Ten Years Head of 

Military Department, Dies at 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Word has just heen received of the 

delta of Major Goorgt C. Martin, r.s.A. 
retired, who passed away at his home 
in Jacksonville, Fla . on Felt. 7. No 
particulars have heen received. Major 
Martin, then Captain, was Commandant 
and Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics at M. A. C. for ten years— 1806 
to 11)15. lie served for a longer period 
I . y far than any other military otlicer 
who has ever heen at the College* and 
probably the length of his detail has 
not heen exceeded in the history of the 
War Department to the Land (Irani 
colleges. 
< aptain Martin endeavored to make 

the military work ethcient without try- 
ing to over-militarize the institution. 
This was not an easy thing to do in the 
■ lays hefore the H. O. T. C. The uhjeel 
nt military drill was less understood 
then than now and while prohahi.i 
-indent, in after years realized its 
value, during college days it was a re- 
quirement more or less undesirable tiuin 
tin- undergraduate point of view. 

• aptain Martin's relations to the fac- 
ulty were peculiarly delightful. He 
was ■ man of tine social gifts, most con- 
siderate of the faculty point of view, 
always ready to co-operate with the 
teachers. He bore with unfailing good 
nature a serious invalidism that not 
only must have been trying to him as a 
man, but that incapacitated him for 
c military service before he had 
reached middle life. 

1 aptain Martin was a graduate of 

Vermont Academy; was at Cornell for a 

time and took his degree at the I'niver- 

of Vermont in 1892. He taught in 



AMHERST CONCERT BY 

M. A. C. MUSICAL CLUBS 



Dancing Follows Annual Concert in 
Town Hall. 

The annual concert by the college 
Musical Clubs in the Amherst Town 
Hall, Tuesday evening. Feb. K>, drew a 
large audience of townspeople as well 
as a goodly scattering of students, at- 
tracted mainly by the dancing numbers 
which followed the program, with 
music by the college orchestra. 

Pol lowing close upon the alumni con- 
ceit of the week before, the clubs were 
in prime condition and showed the re- 
sults of keeping in training since their 
Christmas trip, which is the most im- 
portant trip of the year. The proceeds 
heing realized from this conceit will 
help materially to put the clubs 00 a 
tirin footing to carry them over to next 
season. 

The program was practically the 

sa aslhatot I he alum ni conceit . The 

uuiiibeis by t he quartet te weie especi- 
ally well received, as was the "Fifth 
Symphony in 1) Flat", as rendered by 
the Peerless Pair, Vinten and Labrovitz. 
The two eiiiiis also came in tor their 
shaic of praise for good work done. 



VARSITY LOSES TWO CLOSE 
GAMES IN CONNECTICUT 



"PAGEANT OF PILGRIMS" 
GIVEN AT ST0CBRIDGE HALL 



Many Faculty Members and Students 
In Unity Church Production. 

The I'nity Church presented tin* 
"Pageant of the Pilgrims," by Kst her 
Willard Hates at Stoekbridge Hall last 
Friday evening. Feb. 11 at 8 i\ St. The 
pageant was organised by Fanny L. 

goffer*. Keek of a high calibre was 

furnished by Kuth K. Dyer of Hi. Boi- 

yoke College, organist; Marion Searles, 



ntered the army. During his ser- 
at the College be taught matbe- 

m dies for a time. When he left the in- 
Itioa in January, 1915, be left 

behind him a host of friends among 

faculty, alumni and students. 



Mt. Holyoke, pianist; Ada < 'hadwick ei 

public schools and fitting schools before Springlield, violinist. 

The chorus composed of Miss Clara 
L. Rogers, Mrs. Bertha Serex,. Mrs. Clara 
S. Dickinson Charles K. Yinten and Har- 
lan N. Worthley, took an especially in»- 
portantparl in theprodu ction and their 
work aided materially in its sin •< M M 

The stage manager was Jack Smith 
M. A. C. '21. The pageant consisted of 
three episodes. "The Pilgrims Resolve 
to Leave Scn.oby", "The Landing of 
the Pilgrims'.and lbe"First Thanksgiv- 
ing Day". The program was well ren- 
dered before a large and appreciative 
audience. Many members of the fac- 
ulty and student body took part in the 
performance. 



M. A. C. SEVEN MEETS GREEN 
ON HOME RINK THURSDAY 



Hale and Smith Show Great Form. 
Fine Treatment Given Team. 

Two close scores with a total differ- 
ence of only thirteen points tells the 
story of the two losses sustained by t lit* 
varsily basketball team last week-end 
in Connecticut. C. A. C won their 
game on Friday night by a 20-10 score 
while the next night Iboetto a g Wesley- 
an team was victorious by a 23-17 count, 
both games were fast, well played and 
clean throughout. The refereeing was 
particularly good and the hospitality 
shown the team at both places was ex- 
cellent. The team was very well treated 
at Glastonbury. Mr. and Mrs. Stan- 
ellfffa Hale and Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
Koser entertained ihe team in tine style 
at their respective homes and gave 
them a ihealre party in Hartford. 

In theC. A. C. tfitnie the tine work of 
Hale stood out prominently. Playing 
agatael Alexander, the fastest man on 
the Connecliciilt team, this husky soph- 
omore held the fast back to one basket 
whereas all season the C. A. C. scores 
have been largely made up ot Alex- 
ander's individual scores The Aggie 
man also scored one basket himself 
Mnith played well in this name and 
Continued on page 2 



DEATH CLAIMS WELL- 
KNOWN CAMPUS FIGURE 



A gie Appears Stronger Than Dart- 
mouth in Spite of Previous 
Defeat. 

i"iiiorro*r afternoon the green clad 

chasers from Dartmouth will cross 

tt with the Maroon and White on 

Ihe local rink. This is the last scbed- 

game of the season and promises 

a good battle. 

bi a previous game at Hanover early 

>e season, Dartmouth pulled out a 

-' victory in an overtime game, but 



W. F. (Mike) Gibbons, Federal Board 
Student Passes Away. 

Aggie lost one of the most cheerful, 
Meetoaa, kindly men in the Short 
Course, when William F. Gibbons, 
known all over the eamptis as "Mike", 
was found dead in bis bed last Thurs- 
day morning. 

Mike was a soldier to the backbone, 
and served in the regular army for 2«l 
years, lighting Spaniards, Philipinos, 
and Huns, and only slopping when the 
third wound received in Ihe recent war 
made him until for setvice 

Alter bis discharge, he came to Aggie 
and enrolled as a Short Course man in 
the Federal board. He bad been in 
Amherst about a year and a half, and 
bad made many friends. A piominent 
Amherst merchant says of him. "Mike 
was always nentlemanly, very original, 
and would give you the last cent in bis 
pocket if he thought you needed it." 

He wa« 47 years old, one of those who 
saw the opportunity offered wounded 
men for an education, and grasped it. 
He was a member of the Spanish War 
Veterans of Holyoke. 

The funeral service in Amherst last 
Friday afternoon was attended by 250 



PERMANENT SENIOR 

ELECTIONS ANNOUNCED 



King is Re-elected President of the 
Class of 1921. 

The Class of 1»21 has elected its otli- 
cers for the last lime in its career as a 
class at M. A. C It has selected the 
following men to lead it permanently: 
picsideni.Marr M . King; vice-president, 
Charlesti. Mackintosh ;secrelary, Donald 

CDoaglaca; treasurer, Irvtej g.Oray; 

eaptain. Donald A. Lent; semeant-at- 
arins. John D. lirigham ; historian, 

Bafftaald I). Ttllaoe. 

King was re-elected to the office Ol 
president. lie has played varsily 
football for two seasons, was chosen by 
the I'nion for the All New Kuglaml 
eleven and was awarded ihe Pond Me- 
morial Modal recently. He is viee 
president ol the Senate, and a niembei 
of Adelphia. At various times he has 
held other ofhces for lt»21, and has 
played on the class baseball and fool- 
ball teams 

Mackintosh is the president of Adsl- 
pata, and a Senate member. He has 
played on six class teams, and was 
president of M»2I last year. 

Dniiulass has heen on the liulrs and 
State boards, and has been a member 
of the various dance commit lees. 

Gray is (he captain of varsily relay, 
and has been on the varsity track, cross 
country, and football teams. He has 
also helped 1021 in football and track. 

I^ent has played varsity tool ball, base 
ball and basketball He has been se- 
lected for the All New F.ngland and All 
Aggie football teams. '21 has used him 
in track, baseball, football, and basket- 
ball. He was captain of the class last 
year. 

Hrighain stars in both varsily base- 
ball and football. He pitched for the 
varsity last spring and looks like an ace 
for the coming season. At football, 
baseball and track he has made 11*21 a 
coin emier for class honors. 

Tillsoii was re-elected historian, an 
office which he has held for over two 
years. Tillsoii has also been on the 
varsity rifle team, and on ihe 11)21 
Index board. 



"ALTOGETHER ' COMMITTEES 
EXPLAINED BY PREXY 

Monday Chapel was devoted to an ex- 
planation by the President of the stu- 
dent "Altogether" Committees which 



Continued on page S 



Phi Sigma Kappa held a house dance 

Saturday, Feb. 11, at their house. There 

were about twenty couples present 

chaperoned by Miss Chase of Smith and people. The body was taken lo his 

Mrs Mowry of Mt. Holyoke College. I home in Fitcbhurg, where it was given 

a soldier's burial. Seventy of his 
American Legion comrades escorted the 
body to the grave. 



1 Music was furnished by Smith s orches- 
tra. Refreshments were served by a 
local caterer. 



THE AGGIE REVUE 

is coming 
i'miiAV NioiiT at 7-00 in Stockbridge 
Hall. There are no reserved seats 
so come early and escape the rush. 

Admission by Social Cniou tickets 
or .10 cents. 










were tec. -nt 1 .v appointed to look i'»t<» 
the questions .»l entrance, courses Ol 

htii.ly, methods Ol siinly. improvement 
Ol scholarship, schedules, value of 
courses, vocational council, student 

government and activities, noosing 
problems, enlisting ftssbsson rrooi see- 

on.laiy schools, athletics ami all others 
of importance to the college. 

These committees are lo uel as many 

suggestions as possible from all somes. 

Their purpose is lo make activities M 
ttrong as they ean he made, and t" SO- 
list pul. lie support. In tuct, we are 
really trying to study oui problem! 
with the good ol Aggie always in mind. 

SENIORS AND 

SOPHOMORES WIN 



The Mass achusetts Colkgiac, Wednesday, February 16, 1921. 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 16, 1921. 



VARSITY LOSES TWO GAMES 

Continued from page 1 

MOred iwiee from the Moor. Marshman 
also got in two nice haskels alter fast 
trips down the tloor. Hoserseored seven 
points on fouls but was not sueeessful 
with his tries for lloor baskets, Baxter 
was the star performer for the home 
lean, although on the whole the M. A 
C. team seemed to have the edge on 
their opponents by virtue of their 
superior potting 

If. A. C. 

Boner, rl 

Smith, It 

Boil, If 

Marshinan, 
Hale rg 
(.ovvdy, l| 

liaskets from lloor -Smith 2, Koner, 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit » 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprletoi 



0. A. C. 

lg, Pntnnm 

lg, Lord 

e, Qromwnldt 

If, Baxter 
rf, Alexander 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's 0ffice-$1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Interclass Basketball SerieB End. 
Froah-Soph Game to be Played. 

\iicr running a close raee with tbe 
Seniors throughout l his winter's basket- 
hall seas the Sophomores DBOOOged 

to come out on top of I he list by deteat- 

ing LbeS-Vr team lost Fridoy olght in 

the linal sel of gamSS. This makes a 
clean slate of 4 victories lo I he credit ol 
11)2:5. Although I be Seniors have played 
a good gOOSO IhroOgbOUt tbe whole 

lesson, tbey lost to thn Sophomores si 

the tirst ol thfl OOOSOfl by a close score, 
and wen- thus put out of the running 
for championship honors. 

This makes ti.e si coin! time thai 'M 
has put out a Sinning basketball team. 

Much ot the credit for ibis la due 

I umey, who has put tip a fast exhibition 
ol the name whenever lie has played 
on the lloor. His icauiinaies have work- 
ed well with him, and show the advant- 
ages "f good experience sodtroioiog. 
Besides blm, high scours for the season 

have been Annstronn, '-'1. and Stevens 
of the Two Year learn. 

The names last Friday were the last 
on the schedule before the numeral 
name, th« date for which will be an- 
nounced later. 1 In- scorinn of tbe first 
name seemed to be mostly a race be- 
tween Armstrong and Peroral!, who 
made all of I he U points for "24. The 
..nit game was fast, especially in the 
second half, when the Two Year eaiue 
to within 4 points of their opponents, 
hv tbe tleet work of their two clever 
forwards. The lineups: 



Marshman i.HolO.PotOOM ^Alexander, 



Baxter 8, and (Jroinwaldt. 

The gam* the next evening was a 

l.tilc closer and faster. Smith played 

a tine brand of ball for M. A. C. putting 

up one of tbe Boost exhibitions of play 

,,,.„ ,„. has eve shown, lie had only a 

fan chances to shoot for a basket but 

was successful on two tries ; while his 

Hoor work was ve.ygood. Marshman 

pl.yed well and eon.i.buted t WO 000 

kcis from tl«e Boot as in the previous 

evening. Captain (lowdy, it is needless 

,o sav, ployed a stellar game on tbe 

defense and contributed his share lo 

the score b] dropping in a nice basket 

tl o,„ mid Hoor. BOOOr, Smith and 

Marshman all scored in .he lirsl ball 

,,,„„ ,|,e lloor while Koser scored twice 

from tbe foul line. The ball ended with 

,he sere in Wesleyan's favor and tbey 

were oowhoodod. BoWnoooood Hoo- 

ilawich plav-d well for tbe home team 
and as betoie stated, Smith's work was 
of I he best 



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Wkhi.ky v\ 
lg, King 



rg, Ikmdawich 
c, 11 art man 
If, Boblooos 

rf. Myalls 



M. \. < - 

liosei . if 
Smith, If 

Boll, H 

Marshman. c 
Hale, rg 
Thompson, rg 

Qowdy, lg 

Haskets from Hoor Smith 2, Booer, 
Marshman 2, dowdy. King, llosdawxh 
I Uartman. BobtOOOO 4. and Hyalls. , 
Heferee-Oberdick. Scorer-Bateman. 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



— FOR 



KHKS1IMKN 

Sitne, Uartlett 
rg, Qifford 

c Hill, Bliss 

if. Format! 



•onions 

Booofl, tiger, rf Is. 

Armstrong. If 

Ilrigbain. c 

(ioiild, Waite. rg 

Alger, Bosoff, Waite, lg 

rf, Whitman, Sime 
Score— l'.«2l. IB; ISBO, IS, Haskets 
from tloor— A rinsi long 4. Ferranti t, 
Bosoff, Brighom. Free tries— Ferranti 
6, Armstrong 4. Score at end of tirst 
half— ">-4, in- favor of Seuiors. Heferee 
— (Irayson. 



■OPHOXOREB 

(Irayson, rf 
Borgoet, If 

Tumey. <■ 
Wirth, Alger, rg 
lg. Hunter 



2-vi \i: 

lg, Adair 

rg, Maggi, Uroos 

c, Grant 

If, Stevens 

rf, Qirsrd 



MUMN1 BANQUET 

Last Friday night tbe alumni at Slons, 
Conn, gave a banquet in honor of the 
Viirs Uv basketball team. The team 
|t»elf was Unable Ul be present owing to 
training rules but Coach Gore and Man- 
ager Bunker represented them. Mr. 
Gore was called on for the principal 
speech. Those present were Prof. Lam- 
son head of the Zoology Dept.. Dr. 
Newton 04, head of the Chemistry 
Dept , Ell is '13. County Agent Leader, 
and Mrs. (J. Strange) Ellis T4, Baker 
11 director of the Extension Serv.ce, 
Southwick, Hartford County Agent, 
Davis 15 and Clark 'IB. 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Soore— 1928, 24: T. V.. 20. Baskets 
from floor— Tumey 10, Guard I, (.ray son 
2 Grant SJWOYOOS t. Free tries Stevens 
8, Score at end of first half— lo-">. for 
■■±'>. Kefelee PTOf. H'.cks. 

The tinal Stoodlog of the teams in the 
league: 







Won 


Lost 


Sophomores, 


LOOO 


4 


(1 


Seniors, 


.ToU 


1 


1 


Two-Year, 


.600 


2 


2 


Pl esh men . 


■J 5(1 


1 


1 


.1 uniors, 


.()(><) 





4 



GLEE CLUB ENTERTAINS 

IN SUNDERLAND 

Last Friday evening, Feb. 11, the 
Slee Club was invited by the Women s 
Club of Sunderland to give an informal 
entertainment is the Town Hall, in con- 
nection with a little play given by the 
IOCS] club entitled the" Family Album . 
The Glee Club rendered selections 
before and after the play. Dancing 
and refreshments followed and after 
having enjoyed a very good time the 
songsters were driven home in outomo- 
mobiles by the townspeople. 




YOU'LL smoke a WD C more than an ordinary pipe 
because it's a sweet, mellow smoke. Follow the old 
pipe connoisseurs and have three, four, or more WD L Pipes 
on your rack. Smoke a cool one every time Then you H 
know what a real smoke is. Any good dealer will furnish 
you with several select shapes. 

WM. DEMUTH St CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLDS LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 



AGGIE INN 



DO YOU LIKE FIG PIE ? 

That is only one of the specials served at the AGGIE INN Sunday nights- also waffles, 
croquettes, clam chowder, chops, scalloped potato, and fudge. Caramel and whipped 
cream cake will be found on the menu. 

NOTICE The rest of the month THE INN will close at 7-30 P. M., except on Sunday and Monday 
nights, and after important college activities, when the closing hour will be 11-00 P. M. 



PRINCIPAL STEARNS AT 

SUNDAY CHAPEL 



PROF. MARSHALL TALKS 

ON GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Phillips Academy Head Talks on 

Application of Old Testament 

8tory. 

Principal Alfred K. S'eains "f Phillip* 
\cademy, Andover, nave a very inier- 
eetiOf address ai Chapel last Sunday 
inoralsg. Mr. steams i«>t>k M Ihs bosie 
,,t Ml address, 100 Old Testament story 

id Klijah Seeing ioto the oiMornees, 

and «>f his boorlog the wolds of God, 
What dOCSl thou here." 
Mr. Stearns pointed out how the same 
thing is happening every day of our 
I "God ■|<»Slu not only to individ- 
ual!, hut to nations at erUieol 1110- 
, is", he continued. "The ca.l 00OM 

t,i ihe I'nited Slates at the beginning 0| 

the war, and oltboogO slow in dolog so, 
-lie finally answered the ebollooge. 

I speaks lorOOgB your conscience, 

never more stroegly toon daring joor 

college day*. Althounb the college 
puiHOife untold opportunities, it may 
nun out a catastrophe if not used 
rigbllj. The man who comes without 
( purpose, ean, Ihioimh his social life, 
his friends, his privileges, crystallize 
ihe weakness which threatens his char- 
acter. If a man's aim is seltish, the eol- 
|«g« hecomes a deadly instrumeiil. The 

roiee comes with every individual prob- 
lem. You cannot «et away from it. 
ReOtotse comes after every t/rong act. 
Vision and Ottgfct* mental powers are 
needed I hat civilization may 00 pre- 
served, bOl here conies the gfOOl dan- 
g«I ol looking down on former SOSOet- 
aies. friends and even memhers of your 
tamily. It is a rare opp..riunity to lilt 
those one has left behind, to the high 
levels he has ohtained. No one can 
afford not to listen to God'l voice. 



Director 8peaks at Wednesday As- 
semhly. 

Prof. Cboriea R. Marshall, Director of 
tbe Groduote School si M. k.C, spoke 

on the GrsdllSte School at Assemlily 
last Wednesday, Feb. !l. Troi. Maishall 

is a tirm believer in agriculture (or 

young moo, not from a material stand- 
point especially , hut from thespiiilual 
side. 

Opportunities fot brood persons! in- 
dependence ate hound up in this voce 
tion, and the successliil tanner must 
be both a naturalist and a business 

man. Agriculture is do) all forming; 

there are numerous sides. sueD a> forest 
specialty and marketing. The purpose 
of the Graduate School b to take one 
path leoding to the gool. 'I'he questios 

comes up "What is an education in a^ 
ricul.urc" and "What is added 1>> 
graduate work :•" Proctieo, science, 
economics, hnmonltles ood social wel- 
fare constitute an Ogrlcolturol eduea 
lion The larinei iniisl bo lamiliai 
with all the element- ol agriculture 
and must lie espsble of Btilislng these 
elements. From these facts comes the 

definition of forssiog: an occupation 

which utilizes all ihe elements foi 1 
definite end. 

There are two lines of endeavor Is 

the Grodoste School, ooolstbointooelvc 
eooroa lendlog to too Hsstsr "t Seieoee, 

and Ihe other is the grodOOtS profes 

sional line, as, for example. Masier ot 
Landscape A rch ilect ure. There is a 
grSOl demand for these latter lines. 

The Grodooie Bobool is a soeesssrj coo- 

liuuaiioii of study in an agricultural 
college. The biggest and most highly 

trained men .lie needed. 




Iii .i six i.il swim, the kii(l id 
u splash "you make, depends lotgcl) 
on your evening clothes ! 

No bighei standard than Rogers 

IV, I. 

The crack custom t.nlot's stand. ml 

at much less than the fine tstior'sfee. 
The best ol everything college men 

wear 

RonKits I'kkt Con pant 
lirosdwsy 



at IStli Si 



'Four 

( mi venienl 
< 01 ners" 



llroad wa\ 
it :14th SI. 



Hrosdwsy ( ..niers" Filth A ve. 

;,i Warren ol 41st St. 

SKW VORK CITY 



Get the Habit 

I. M. LABRO VITZ 

'llir heading Tailor and 
anils' Furnishings 

— Full Dress suiis to Bool 
Clothes sponged and pressed bj 

Hoffmmn Mmchinm 

Our Wi'ik- It Quaranti • •' 

Gome and open an accoJiiil with me 

Phone 302-W 

11 Amity St., Amherrt, Mom. 



THE 

DRAPER H< 

Northampton, Mass. 



The Leader for College Banquets 



Win. M. Kimball, Prop. 



Hanai.tMlli IMR'J 

Stkimi i-;n I,ank FoLOII. IbOO»i 

M tNI'KACI'I'HI MCJ .ll'AVF.I.K.Pd 

IOO BROADWAY, Ni-:\v YOBK 

OtJUB a N i» «<u.i.i:«. ■ 
I 'INK AND HINOa «* 

antOi NII.VKH ANI» BHUN'/.r MltltAI.M 



DELTA PHI GAMMA 

HOLDS VALENTINE PARTY 



Successful Function Attended by 
Over 30 Couple. 

\ very successful Valentine DOOCS 

and party was held in the Drill Hall 

SaturdOf evening from 7-45 to 11-1") l>> 

lbs Helta Phi tiamma Sorority. The 

hall was lit tin«ly decorated for the oc- 

ession with red and white streamers, 

and an abundance of hearts. The walls 

II covered with M blankets and 

banners, Palms were set in the corners. 

Tbe patrons and patronesses were Prof. 

and Mrs. Hicks, Mrs. liachrach and Miss 

met. Music was furnished by an 

ibersl College orchestra: Anderson, 

traps; Koyce, violin; and Claster, piano. 

resbntOOtl consisted of punch and 

kies, Tidrty-three couple attended. 

Heart dances were a feature of tbeeveii- 



MR. GREEN INSTITUTES 

FRATERNITY LIBRARIES 

The Library bus put a collection ol IS 

lo 18 books III Ihe IS liatelllily houses 

This is an entirely new scheme in I he 
colleges as M. A. •'. is the tirst college 
lo try this plan. The plan is similar to 

Ihe Public Libraries placing I ksin 

lire stations, and public schools. The 

I ks in these col led ions are "I lo 

World Almanac", "Cosblng'l Manual". 

•|iow to Study" ood books 00 College 

Lite and Sell-improvement . In ploclosj 
these books in I be bouses, the Library 
selected books which would Dot bSOflld 

in any course ol study, Uodor this sr- 

raogeSBOOl tbe Library hopes to »et tee 
students seqooiotod with a number ol 
valuable books whieh lliesliident does 
not know about. The collect ion will 
be ehonged every t bree months. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable m dollars and tense" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerficid, Mass 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



MORANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 

Manufacturers institution Cooking Apparatus 



of 

86 WASHINGTON *T. 



BOSTON 



!)t. Fernabl has been writiim a "Text 
k on Kconotnic Kntoniolou'v ," which 
expects will ro to presH in the near 
re. 



••211.— Mist Susan \ Sinilb ol (.leal 

Borriogtos is sotiog as 1 grodoste ss- 

sistan 1 in the department ot chemistry, 
dnriog a lull in industrial BO OdU loO S in 
Springfield, where s| 1( . has been em- 
ployed eiOCe Any. 1. 



Carp?rvter Of Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



No I, Cook Plsce, 



Amherst, Mono 






The MaHAchuwttB Collegkn, Wednesday, February 16, 1921. 



The Massachusetts CoUeffian, Wednesday, February 16, 1921. 






li • 





THE MASSACHUSETTS COUEOIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Laeanea P. Martin "21. KdUor-ln-Ctalef 

Robkkt L. .Ionics II Managing Kditor 

Associatk Editors. 

Oioiuir. W. Ehman "21 

Kk.nnkth A. Bahnakd 'Tl 
Stanley W. Bkomi.ky '!« 
I'ai i. I. Hi knktt '22 

HollAKT W. BPKINd '22 

Kbi.dino F. Jackson '22 

John M. WHITTHtR'28 

L. B. Arrimihin 9J 



Business Department. 

Hkrbkrt I.. (Ikrk "21. Business Manager 

Evkrkti C. J'ribton '21 Advertising Manager 

Chari.k* A. Bick 22 Circulation Manager 

Myron <;. Mi hkay '22 

HoI.DKN WlllTTAKBR '23 

owkn K. rotaoa '28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for m: ling at spec'*' 
rate of iM.ntage provided for in section 110S. Act 
of October. l»l" authorized August 20. 1918. 



year is half over and for the seniors, al 
least, commencement anil graduation 
seem liut a step into tomorrow. 

Tentative commencement plaits call 
for the '"biggest and best ever", '"old 
stuff", murmurs the suffering student, 
overburdened with the strenuous men- 
tal effort of maintaining his scholastic 
equilibrium. But here, my downtrod- 
den friend, is a chance for you to set a 
standard iu jubilee celebration which 
will he a bright spot in Aggie history 
for all lime. VVa have the occasion— 
our postponed semi-centennial. We 
have the materials — dedication of the 
Memorial Building, return of alumni 
(the estimate is for 1000), and a poten- 
tial pageant. 

It is distinctly your job. You are to 
be the hosts, the alumni are to be the 
guests. The general public will be 
present to a greater extent than ever 
before. But the most important of all, 
as never before, M. A. C. is to "sell'' 
herself to the alumni ami people of this 
state. You must, as hosts, show them 
hospitality worthy of the name. 

A suggestion. Take up the matter 
iu your next class mcctinn. Appoint a 
committee. It is not loo early to begin. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Uneasy. 
The student body is uneasy. The 
faculty are skeptical. The Athletic 
Department is frequently aroused to 
protest. Something must be the 
trouble at Aggie. Some little cog is 
slipping, and missing too often. 

Student activities are crowding more 
and more. They are taking time away 
from studies. They are even lighting 
themselves. All too frequently several 
organizations call meetings at the 
same hour, making it necessary for 
some to leave one duty to attend to 
another. The student activities com- 
mittee has got to go into this matter in 
detail Can you help them out by 
publishing your ideas in the Coi.i.k- 
gian - .' Are we burdened with too 
many afternoon laboratories, so that we 
have to concentrate our study, our 
pleasure and our appreciation of the 
Arts into the short hours following 
supper-time - .' Are Athletics beginning 
to hold too much attention in college ? 
Athletics come second to studies and 
should not be made a business proposi- 
tion in college from the sfudont view- 
point. The student athlele wants a 
clean, invigorating exercise; a diver- 
sion from his studies. The athlete of 
twenty years' age doesn't want to spend 
afternoons and evenings and often be- 
tween-times thinking and playing Ath- 
letics. When has he a chance to do the 
studyintr be should - .' When can he 
read or do the few odd tasks he may 
need to do? 

Last, and not least, surely, is the 
fraternity question. To what extent 
are fraternities injuring college spirit ? 
Is it not fair that fraternities should 
have Monday nights for their meet- 
ings? If so there should be no friction 
between fraternities and college spirit. 
How about it '.' 



Wkdnksday. Vv.u. 10. 
7 4.". r. m. - Animal Husbandry Meet- 
ing. Auditorium. Professor 
l.oomis, Amherst College. 
Thuksoay, TUB. 17. 
7-00 i>. m. — Roister Doisler Rehearsal, 
(lark Hall. 

Friday, Fkb. i«. 

4-00 r. m. — Basketball. Freshmen vs. 

Northampton at M. A. C. 
740 r. M.— Aggie Revue, Auditorium. 

B HOBDAY, Fkb. 10. 
8-00 p. m.— Basketball, M. I. T. vs. M. 

A. C, Drill Hall. 

SlMlAY, FkH. '20. 

ii-00 a. m.- Sunday Chapel, Speaker, 
Rev. William H. Day, The 
United Church. Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Monday, Fkh. 22. 
Holiday- Washington's Birth- 
day. 

:UK) p. m.- Basketball — W o r c est e r 
lech vs. M. A. C, Drill Hall. 

MO i*. m.— Movies in the Auditorium. 
7 reel Rathe picture and 2 reel 
comedy. 



The Metiawampe Club will hold a 
Trek to Belchertown Feb. 19. 

Prof. Frank A. Waugh delivered his 
lecture "A Better IMace to Live" at as- 
sembly last Wednesday. This was al 
Connecticut Agricultural College, how- 
ever. 

Two new Musical Club concerts have 
been announced. On Feb. 25 they will 
perform for the Elks at Northampton 
and on March 5, they will give a concert 
at Mt. Holyoke College. 

Miss Frances Rowers has been en- 
gaged by Librarian (ireen to take Miss 
Middletou's place iuthe upstairs library 
of the chapel. Miss Rowers was former- 
ly employed in Flint laboratory. 

The Y. M. C. A. activities of the last 
few weeks have included the Weekly 
World Fellowship Discussion Groups by 
Professor Machmer, the Bible leaders 
Training Class by Professor Wells, 
Dwight Station work, and Sunday 
school teaching in West Farms. 

Wednesday evening, Feb. 10, at 7-45 
in Bowker Auditorium, there will be a 
Meeting of the Animal Husbandry Club 
at which Professor Rootnis of Amherst 
College, who has conducted scientitic 
researches in western U. S. for the past 
15 years, will lecture on the origin and 
history of the prehistoric horse. There 
will also be stereoptican slides with the 
lecture. 

A very successful dance was held bj 
theTheta Chi fraternity, Saturday at 
ternoon and evening. Decorations were 
in the fraternity colors, and were ap- 
propriate to Valentine's Day. There 
were 10 couples dancing, music being 
by the Fraternity orchestra. Supper 
was served at the house. Miss Barney, 
of Smith and Mrs. Wheeler of Mt. Hol- 
yoke, were chaperones. 



3 -MORE HAIR NETS 

Specially priced for 

Friday and Saturday 



-AT — 



3 for 25c 

Regular Price, 2 for 25c- All Colors. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 



Hat. at 3 

Eve. 2 shows 
6-45. 8-30 



SI FFBB-PEODUCTKM WAV 

Anita Stewart.Ward Crane. 
Irving Cummings and Myrtle 
Stedman in "Harriet and 
the Piper," from the novel 
bj Kathleen Norrts. The fa« 
clnatins heroine of M ohl 
Kentucky" In a new play of 
the same com pel I inn Interest 
News. Topics, Mutt and Jeff 



FACULTY ORGANIZES 

BASKETBALL TEAM 



NOTICE : 

Anonymous contributions do not re- 
ceive the attention of the Coi.i.kuian 
board. The anonymous contributor is 
usually biding an ulterior motive other 
than that professed. Only signed 
articles, criticisms, and commenta- 
tions are worthy of attention and will 
be considered. 



Friday 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 

Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eva.— 2 Show* 

6-45. 8-30 



Monday 

Hat. at 3 
Ev*. at 8 

Coming 



Dorothy Dalton in "Hit 
Wife's Friend." A. thrilling 
mystery story of a delight 
fully different stamp.ln wbl< h 
Miss Dalton plays a title.! 
Knglishwoman. 

Scenic rati 
2-reel Hack Sennett Comedy 

Enid Bennett and Nile, 
Welch in "Stepping Oat." 

You won't mind ' Stepping 
Out' to see this interesting 
drama with considerable coin 
eily Kpaikling throughout. 
"The King of the Circus" 
Newt Comedy 

Olive Thomas and Hatt 
Hoore in "The Glorious 
Lady." The quaint story «>f 
a plain peasant girl's love for 
a high nobleman. 
Pathe Review. L' reel Comedy 

" Way-Down Eaat " 

Watch for play dates 



HARTFORD HIGH IS 

DEFEATED BY 1924 FIVE 



PAPER CITY ENGRAVING GO,, Inc. 



Makers of High-grade Cuts for all 
kinds of Publications. 



RADCLIFFE BUILDING 

Phone 700 

Holyoke, Mass. 



Will You Help? 
The Year of Jubilee, as outlined by 
I'rexy, is fast getting on. .Scheduled 
events are rapidly disappearing into the 
past and the new is replacing the old 
at an astonishing speed. The collegiate 



Twelve Candidates Report For 
Practice. 

The Faculty have shown that they 
are very much in the game by their 
recent entry into the basketball world. 
Two practices have been held with 
twelve candidates out. Prof. Edward 
F. Burke has been elected manager. 
Plans are being made for two games 
with the Amherst Faculty, and it is 
hoped that the first game will be held 
at home, next week. Those who are 
out are: Kdward J.Burke. Harold M. 
Gore, E. E. Grayson, Win. S. Regan. W. 
K. Philbrick, Win. Daunt, Win. F. 
liobertson, A. C. Faneuf, Uobert Haw- 
ley, (iuy Thelin, Willard K. French, and 
Paul ISerex, Jr. 

Congratulations to the ComMmeHeui 
Comtpua, who have recently had the 
good fortune to have the C. A. C. ad- 
ministration give them a room in the 
administration building as an office. 



Yearlings Get Revenge For Early 
Season Defeat. 
The Freshman basketball team de- 
feated the Hartford High School team 
last Saturday afternoon at the Drill 
Hall by a t-eore of 26-17. The Fresh- 
men were defeated in the early part of 
their season by the Hartford team at 

home. 

Weatherwax, playing center, {instead 
of his usual position at guard, got into 
the shooting and scored a couple of 
baskets. Kane, playing his usual type 
of hard, steady basketball, tossed in 
four baskets. Kscholtz, for the visitors, 
played good ball, and was the chief 
means of scoring for Harttord. 

The lineups: 

M A- ,-. tlAHTFOKl) HIGH 

Kane, if lg, Barkus 

Barrows, If r K, Sexton 

Weatherwax, Salmon. I 

c, McMinnigal, Goooman 
Brunner, rg Id Escholtz 

Hairston, lg rf - Cohen 

duals from floor: Kane 4, Barrows, 
Weatherwax 2, McMinnigal, EscholU 6. 
Goals from fouls: Barrows 12. teettolts 
3. Score: 1N24-26, Hartford High 
School-17. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

College Jewelry-Cuff Links. Soft Collar Pins. 
Dress Salt Sets. Violin. Banjo. Mandolin Strings 

Fine Watch Repairing, also Broken Lenses 

Replaced I'romntly. 

32 Main Street, Amherst. Mass. 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
Amateur Developing and Printing 

Hills Studio -Phone 456-R 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

CATERING FOR 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At KRATKRMTIK8 EVKRY NIGHT 



Suits Pressed, 65c 

on Sanitary Pressing Machine. 

LABR0VITZ, 11 Amity Street 




IN THE VE8TIBULB OF FAME 

—They celebrute the arrival of the fifteNt by lining up a 
row of busts. 

At Walsh's they put you into u Suede Country Jacket that 
is a passport to any hall of fame . . . but how comfortable and 
convenient for campus wear. 




VARSITY DEBATE IS ARRANGED 



Tryouts to be Held Feb. 23. 

A varsity dehate has he-en arranged 
with SiiritiKtield Collage to take ptaee 
,.u April 7. Both oollegea will have 
two teams, one gotag away and debat- 
ing one side of the question, and the 
other Maytag at home and upholding 

the ni her side. The question to be de- 
bated la "Beaelved: that, waiving all 

questions as t<» transportation and emi- 
Kiimtionality, the Federal Qoverataeal 
should own and operate all las eoal 

mines in the United States." 

Trials will lake plaee east Wedee* 
day evening, Feb. '23. . la Btoehbrtdge 
Hall. Candidates visaing to try awl 
■boald hand tto-ir names to Manager 

Loekwood immediately. Several have 
already signified their intent ions at 
competing, hut there are not enough 
v.i. Freshmen are eligible. Ill pick- 
ing the teams eaeh candidate will in 
three minutes present a constiuelive 
argument on one side ot t he question, 
to he assigned. The eantlidale will 
then have one minute to refute the 
previous speaker. Any f urlher infor- 
mation will be «iven as the candidates 

report. 

GROUNDS DEPARTMENT 

LESS BUSY THIS WINTER 



Cost and Labor of Removing Snow 
Has Been at a Minimum. Inter- 
esting Data Given. 
f OS, the north wind doth blow, and 
once in a while we have snow, hut lo 
all appearances the Grounds Depart- 
ment is very optimistic as to whai will 
be the cost of removing snow this tea* 
lonai compared with last winter. In 
i in, they point with pride to the tact 
thai it has cost them only I6J% as 
h to remove snow to date as ii did 
in the same period last year. In other 
words, while it cost them $440 V> to 
remove the snow up to Feb. 1 last year, 
MOOS! them only $UW.71 to remove 
it this year. The Grounds Department 
- this difference in cost to the fact 
that the snow has melted quicker this 
than last. They expect that this 
will hold true for the rest of the winter. 
V curious thing in regard to theex- 
M of clearing away the snow is the 
tact that during the last nine years, on 
only two occasions has the Grounds 
department had to remove snow during 
S •vember. Expense incurred from re- 
ingsnow in October or December 
heen common, but for some reason, 
\ Frost has avoided giving trouble 
It \"vetuber. 

winter has been very hard on 
is, it having been very easy to make 
kl in the absence of snow. 



17.-— E. E. Grayson has been playing 
M'icuously fine basketball for the 

tiampton five, holding down a guard 

don in top-notch style. 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Not) Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association. 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
Hockey Assoc iation, 
Basketball Association, 
The Collegian. 
Roister Doisters, 
The Aggie Squib, 
Musical ( lubs, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

TasapsMM 

G. M. Campbell, Ass't Sec. 175 J 

G. M.Campbell, Secretary 175 J 
C. S. Hicks, Central Mgr., 403-M 
V. P. Rand, Manager 136 R 

< 1). Kendall, President -'So 

( '. V. Clark, Manager 
Lorenzo Fuller, Manager 

F. A. Cilbert, Manager 
|. I). Fvers, Manager 
C. \V. Bunker, Manager 
I. P, Martin, Kditor 

G. W. Fdinan, Managt 1 
at F. Webster, Fditor 
Krederk Howard, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-one Index, C. I). Kendall, Mriager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. \Y. Spring, Manager 
Y. M. C. A., Howard (loft President 



280 
832S 

416 M 

280 

8377 
280 

214 

832S 
280 

280 
83«4 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to oat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 41fi-W) llailley. Mass. 



K 






w^hoe 

SPECIAL 



tore 



$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 



They're starting rigKt 
!a&™^» with^a 

De Lava) 





S. S. HYDE 

Optiolllll fllKl J*»\V«<llT 

I naaSSJftt Street i up one ttlglit . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 

AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 



Kully liuuranteed 



N0VICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

deal I.V and BTOSBplj dour. 

Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 






There are more than 2,500,000 
De Laval Separator* in daily 
use throughout the world 



DAIRYING with a l)c Laval 
Cream Separator lias brought 
prospcriry to many thousands' of 
us< i s. No brant h of fannina is so 
sun! - profitable as p><,<l dairying, 
v. ith its Mtady cash income every 
mon'h in the year and no waiting 
fur crops to mature. 

The De I. aval saves cream twice 
a day, $(•$ (lavs a year. Jr sUbh 
< learn r; produces atnoother, herur 
i ream; la>ts loan r, and UeatM r to 
clean. It pays f.,r itself the first 

ir and may be boug&t on Rich 

liberal terms as t > save its first or t 

v.Ik'c Ik ing | ... 1 for. 1 hue i. a 

There Is a De l-aval Arent near you 
Ask him lor s Ik- 1 ji v al <icaon*traiioa 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

Horn York. 165 Broad war 

Chicago, 29 E. Maduon St. 

San Franci-cr>, CI Bcale St. 



1 



19 Pleasant St. 



lei. 9 J 



runnel ly I uliiiiilila 1 :i f .- 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILI YOU WAIT 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



Soo ner or later you will use a 

De Laval 

Cream Separator or Milker 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - ■ Mass. 



S 
H 
. E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 16, 1921. 










The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 16, 1»2L 



GERALD E. PERRY 15 

MARRIED FEB. 12 

The marriage is aiuiotineeil <>' Garald 
K. Terry ot Amherst and Miss Dorothy 
Lyman Hurl <>t Kasl liamptmi, which 
took plaet <>n Saturday, Wb. 19, at 
Kasthainpton. Mr. lVny is the KM ol 
Mr. and TAX*. B. B. PWTJ of Amherst. 
Me ttraduated from M. A.<\ in IQ16 and 
for the i>a«l three years lias l.een a 
ehemist in 'he federated Malay states. 
ile lias .•out raited for another three 
years oi service and will take his bride 
with bin arrows the l'aeilie. 

SENIOR CLASS INVITED 

TO PRESIDENTS HOUSE 

An invitation has been uiven (he 
Senior Ham 1>Y Tresident and Mrs. 
Hillteilield to he present at an informal 
soeial »iven h> lliem on Sal unlay eve- 
nine, l*»b< M, after the Social Union 
piOSYMB. Th« invitation has been ac- 
Mptfd and the whole Senior class is 
pfenning to attend. The social will he 
in the nature of an informal gOt-UH 
yet her. 



DARTMOUTH PROSPECTS 

Continued from page 1 



All male students at < oiiuecliciit 
AfgU who in the futuie do not *it with 
the cheering section at panics are liable 
to he carried there bodily. The fact 
that they are escorting one of the fair 
Hex to the (SIM will he the only e\euse 
accepted. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 

MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUOS AND CARPETS 

- K. I). MAKSII KSTATK - 



i he Annies are conlident that she will 
not repeat. Since i hat contest compar- 
ative scores a-ainst other teams are all 

in favor of If. A. C Tli* Green lost to 

Harvard B to and to I*. <'• •* '" "• 

while Annie held the Crimson In two 
goal! and lost to Boston College hy 1 to 
1. M. I. T. who had previously heaten 
li. C. was defeated 2 to 1. 

Dartmouth lias a scrappy anKiena- 
tion wilh a ttrong offense l.uilt around 
('apt. Kothschild at center and I'etiv . 
rover. She also has a Real tender of 
more than ordinary ability In Neidlinff- 
,.i. <»n the other hand, in the names 
againal Harvard and 15. C. the Qreafl 
did not show either the offensive povv.i 
or the . I. tensive sirennth whicli marked 
the Annie's play auainst the same op- 
ponents. 

The pi ev ions name wa- won hy virtue 
of Letter team work on the part of Dart- 
mouth. Coach ManseU'slcam baft been 

bandlcapped ell the aeaaon bj hick of 

practice, hut in spite ol that has im- 
proved greatly. The via from M. 1. T. 

andlheH toll defeat a.imi nistcie.l to 
Tufts certainly ibowed evidence ol 
train power. Dartmouth will face a far 
stronner team than she did at Hanover 

three weeks ano. The Mar i and 

While has a well balanced combination 
an. I when playinn i" the Boston Arena 
was Ltiven credit for being the fastest 
team which has played there, ('apt. 
McCarthy and Coach Mansell alonjj side 
of Lyons and Snow lorm a forward line 
which is danncrous to tiny opponent. 
The defensive ability of I he Collins 
Pool* Newell combination is well shown 
by the fact that Harvard, Boston Col- 
lage, ami M. 1. T.. three ot the strong- 
est learns, ill the east, were able t d- 

lert a total of live u..als in the three 
eames. Dart moul h will have her work 

eui oui to More, and from all present 

indications M. A. (.should be on the 
hum end of I he score. 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 

Shlnm 



Shorn 

Repairing 



IENTKAS 



— THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for lirst-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

II Pleasant St., Amherst. Mass. 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real Bargain* '" 

HI6H GRADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and style* ol shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SAIT. ! 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. <>" raw ■»> aptawn. 






JACKSON & CUTLER 



DKAI.KIIS IS 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



ALUMNI 



AT— 



Economy Prices 
E. M. 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 

HENRI ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, - «»»• 



—The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The«Ui<lent gatherum place for 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 



I 



The Alumni Committee on adminis- 
tration met P>b. ■» at the i ttv Club in 

Boa ton. Another alumni eoroaitiea t<> 

hold a meeting soon is the Alumni 
Student Committee which will meet 
Feb. 90 »t the Motel Kimball la Spring- 
field. The Uoslon Alumni Clttb will 

hold a gathering Feb. SB. 

'0:5. L. F. Harvey, who was 'or three 

tean a county agent , now has a dalrj 

farm tit Mt. (armel. Conn. 

•,,,-, ,_.\. 1). Taylor. I,an«ls< ape archi- 
tect and Town Planner, announce* the 
removal of his ufficca to 4<»o Cook Bo tid- 
ing, 4614 l'rospect Avenue. Cleveland. 
Ohio. 

ti".— The engagement has been an- 
nounced of A. W. Riggina to Beaaic I). 
Etaoletl oi Lowell. 

'OS. K. W. Bailey has entered the 
business ol pearh and citrus growing at 
Riverside. Cal. 

'12. — \V. C. Sanctuary will return to 

M.A.c. ncM fall a* a prof eaaor in the 

Poultry Depart meat. 

'14. — 11. D. Lucas, assistant sitperin- 

lendant of the Neatlc Food Company'! 

plant tit Zunliurg, Ohio, has a son seven 
months old. 

To. — F. K. Parker is headmaster ol 
the Wildwood Winter School at Rock- 
wood, Me. 

'15. 8. A. Dole is captaining 'he All* 
West Haven, Conn, haskethall lean). 

• 1 • •» . — \v. \V. Kieb has announced his 

engagemeii to Stulc I'. Moody ol 
Franklin. 



CORDUROY RIDING BREECHES, 

White Mercerized Oxford Soft-collared Shirts, 
Aeroplane Cloth Shirts, best thing in town, 
Best Grade Imporied Heather Wool Sox, 



Now $6.00 

S fon $3.20 
Now $3.60 
Now $1.25 



Special reductions on Felt Hats, Suits, Over- 
coats, Leather Coats, Sheep-lined Coats, etc. 

This is a good TIME and PLACK to stock up. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for 35 years. 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Farming history shows that over-production and low prices 
one year are almost invariably followed by much smaller 
crops and higher prices the next. To the far-seeing farmer 
this means opportunity. While others wait, he acts. He 
plants; and when the rise comes his crops are grown. 
Do you see the situation in that light? 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers are ready to hel p. They are 
good fertilizers— formulated, mixed, 
cured right. They'll not only give 
your crops a quick start, but they'll 
keep right on feeding them to suc- 
cessful maturity. The very best in- 
gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 
of manufacturing experience go into 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers. 



TV Netted H»r CroP 



7 ~^fc 



Order now for Spring planting. If wtfve 
no dealer near you. write for the agency. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., Inc. 

Bul*\i]\<iry of Tkr imrriean Aa'^ultural Chemical Co. 

51 Chamber. St. New York City 



HAT Is n wft crop. Io- 
tly grown, bandied, 
stored. Alwaya maxkrtabla. 
Or, feed It. Sod aluo en- 
riches soil for next crop. A 
reasonable application of B. 
Frank Coe"s Special Top 
Dressing should nearly 
double yield. Mention your 
soils and write for valuable 
bonk "The Neglected Hay 
Croa." Free, with our fer- 
tilizer suggestions. 



E.FRANKCOES 



Req.U.S. Pat. Off. 



Fertilizers 

Increase the yield of every field 



COLLEGE 
STORE 



• e • 



MENTION OUR NAME 

or show our card to F. M. Thompson & Son on all purchases 
of clothing or furnishings. Bring the slips to us and get 2X 
of the amount in trade. It works. We have granted a large 
number of students such a premium already. Why not try it? 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



C. H. RUMERY, Electrician 

THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 

IN 

SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

(Give «• • trial/ 



If its for HAT RENOVATING, 
GLOVE CLEANING or SHOE 
DYEING, CONSULT THE COL- 
LEGE SHOE -SHINE PARLOR 
BY THE AMER. EX. OFFICE. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



C. F. DYER 



An Opportunity 

The dairyman today fares an unprece- 
dented opportunity to market nutri- 
tious, palatable milk products at a sub- 
RtaotiaJ and continued profit, provided 
iiftully jiuards his operation costs, 
ami protects his product from those pre- 
H ntable losses of quality which so often 
My reduce the margin of his profit*. 
The exceptional cleaning qualities of 



>*/rym*rt3 



recognised by the agricultural col- 
l of the United Stales and Canada 
at) being peculiarly adapted to this need 
Of the dairy industry, and for eighteen 
- i In- cleanser has guarded the del- 
qualities of sensitive milk prod- 
thus saving a substantial margin 
rofit for the careful dairyman. 

I order OS your supply house will 
nee \(>u of the truth of these 

In circle 




It cleans clean. 



>n every pkg- 



J. B. Ford Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



'10. — K. it. Selkregg has moved t<> 
Fort Valley, (Ja., where he is engaged 
in the government laboratory work re- 
cently established there to study the 
plum cureulio and the DTOW I rot ot t lie 
peach. W. 1), Whiteotnh 17 is with 
him. 

'1*1. — \v. k. Doslge is plantation as* 

periiiteudaut for the United Fruit Com- 
pany at San Jose, Costa fttea. 

'10. — Harry A. Curran is located at 
Chicago, 111., where lie is engaged in 
hog buying, j 

'10. — James Nicholson gave a very in- 
teresting lecture to some of tin- mem- 
bers of the Uoister Holsters, Sunday. 

'17. — It. C. Blake is a citrus and live 
stock rancher at Clade City, Kla. 

'18. Darwin Levine was on the 
campus last week-end. He is employ ad 
by the Jewish Agricultural Aid Society. 

'IK.— The marriage ol Louis M. l.y 
ons, whose engagement to Margarel W. 
Tolinan of Norwell, was Renounced 
some time ago, has been set lor this 
coming August. 

Ex-'iM.— u. e. Allen was graduated 

from Harvard I'niversily the past yeai 

tf,— "Hed" Hlanchard has lett the 
Montpelier (Vt.) Semi nary and accepted 
a teaching position at the Detroit 
(Mich.) County bay School. 

'19.— Samuel 11. Ferris is an ice dealer 
at New Mil ford, Conn. 

Ex-'iy.— H. B. Crummei is a student 
at the Kansas Slate Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

'li*. — The engagement of Henry .). 

Hurl to Kuth bracket t has been an- 
nounced. 

19. — The engagement of Julian S. 
Ilea to Mary I,. I'orler of Amherst has 
been announced. 

'19. —Olive Carrole has resinned her 
position as teacher of science at the 
Amherst BlgB School. 

Ex. '19.— Dean W. Alden is a student 
at Worcester Tech. 

'20. — Fred <i. Uorden is Working In 
the ollice of the New Haven Railroad at 
the Grand Central Terminal, New York. 

'20. — F. E.Cole has returned to New 

England from tfasnlngton state. 

"20.— Miss Helen Millard was a visitor 
to the campus over the week-end. 

'20— (i. Dagget is working in Albany. 
Disengagement to Kuth Perry of Al- 
bany has been announced. 

'20.— K. H. Skinner is engaged to Car- 
oline Foster of Mt. Ilolyoke. He is 
with S. S. Fierce of Boston. 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 

Because of the growing number of 
students at M. I. T. who were either 
graduates of or transfers from Dart- 
mouth, a Dartmouth club has been or- 
ganized there. This marks a new de- 
parture in intercollegiate relations. 

The New Hampshire, in the writeup 
of the ML A. C. basketball game of Feh. 
r»: "For the first time thisseason Butler 
was held down to one basket. This 
was largely due to the fact that the 
opposition stuck to bis heels through- 
out the game. Thompson, the Aggie 
center, together with Smith, made it 
almost impossible for 'Ted' to shoot. 
Yes, we noticed that. 



When serving 

HOUSE PARTIES OR LUNCHES 

consult us. If you do not get 

what you want in our display, 
tell us and we will make it. 



W. B. DRURY 

io Main Street. 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



WRIGLEYS 



Bright eyes, 
rosy cheeks, 
and red lips 
come from 

good digestion. 

WRIGLEVSIsa 
delicious aid to the 
teeth, breath, appe- 
tite and digestion. 




TbcuaM 



wTWGitys Bfjgf The 
,J _ S "" mpl- Flavor 

5 f AQ lasts, 



PLAZA 

Nm i li:iiii|itim . . Mum. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the II. •bI 

PHOTO-PLAY 



All' nhliWII. 

Program c banned d»l(jr except Monday 
and Tuesday. 

KKKD'K I'. HKI.MllM. Manager. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., 44 Hamp." 



Candy Shop 



Soda Parlor 



BECKM AN'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 

Northampton. Mt 



ihummtta 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IflC. Northampton, Mass. 



An optical inop wblcn MMMnraa op to the 
in^in'st itandard ot Modern terrice. Y«>m 

CAB rely (111 .mii <<kill and good tMM In all 

ODtll 1 I IMilttcl w. 



Our An Department in tilled with ptctorea 
suitable for the decoration <>f "frat" bowaee, 

"i for hirtliilH) and weililtnif gift*, t.reetiiitf 

earda for particalai people. 



HARDWARE 

Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 







•p.. M.-.h.^ttg Collegian, Wednead.v. February 16, 1921. 




weTare: not dentists 

But you'll sure open your mouth when you notice our new 
narrow ties and distinctive golf hose. Everything we have 
is sure value-il you appreciate real clothes, give us a call. 



AGGIE FAIR TO BECOME 

AN ANNUAL EVENT 



KOLONY KLUB 



HOLDS DANCE 



Tentative Plans Drawn Up for the 
1021 8how. 



The "Aggie Fair," inaugurated on 
tbe campus last October, is going to »« 
an annual event. The Fair Committee, 
OOapOMd of F. A. Waugh, J. A. Foord, 
It. 1). Hawley, and S. B. Haskell, met 
recently, made tentative plans for tbe 
fair uext fall, and promise tbe students 
a larger and better exhibition. 

Although the Fair last October was 
eonlined to the Department of Horticul- 
ture, hereafter the Department of Agri- 
culture and other departments will join 
to make the show representative of all j 
branches of agriculture. 

The 1»21 Fair will be in the latter 
part of October. Tbe Committee de- 
cided that commercial exhibits should 
be restricted very closely to college de- 
partments, and that no outside organ- 
izations should bo included save an 
their exhibits were part of departmental 
exhibits. 

There will be a student midway this 
year, on which the usual fakirs and re- 
freshment booths will have full sway. 
All the profits from these midway at- 
tractions will be turned into the Me- 
morial Building Committee, preferably 
to be used for furnishing the building. 
The following committees were ap- 
pointed: grounds/Lawrence Dickinson, 
chairman: publicity, W. P. B. Lock- 
wood and UK Lyons; prizes, F. A. 
Waugh, chairman; studeut concessions 
and activities, A. A. Mackimmie, chair- 
man; judging, F. C. Sears and J. C. 
Graham. 



Tbe Kolony Hub held an informal 
dance at Masonic Hall, .Saturday , Feb. 
12. from MOJO i'. m. Tbe hall was 
tastefully decorated with a color scheme 
of red, white and blue. Thirty couple 
attended. Dinner was served at « P. M. 
at "The Perry". The patrons and 



patronesses were Prof, and Mrs. J C. 
Sual.an and l'rot. and Mrs. 1".. I. Ander- 
son Music was furnished by Davy s 
orchestra. The committee in charge of 
the dance were tbe following: Newell, 
Baxter, Stevens. MacLeod and Hancock. 



Kx .>i8.-Harold Millard is teaching 
at the Kssex County Agricultural 
school. 



Conspicuous in the lineup of the Dan 
mouth seven here on Thursday will Ml 
Brainy Bower, the Green's premiei 
athlete, who, until now, has been in 
eligible for the llanover septet. Be 
plays a slashing, fast game, and with 
Eaton, former Newton High ice artisi 
who is also eligible as a result of IMMl 
examinations, is liable to cause the 
Maroon and White defence some trouble 




TWO-YEAR ANNUAL 

The two-year classes are to put out an 
annual of their own this year. By do- 
ing this they feel that they can get 
more publicity than it is possible to get 
in a few pages of the Index. There will, 
therefore, be nothing at all in the In- 
dex relative to the two-year classes. 
This is just another step which the new 
comers are taking to strengthen their 
position in college. Steele has been 
elected business manager. 



The Union says: "None of the past 
M. A. C. dead shot foul shooters have 
anything on Dutch Uoser, this year's 
prodigy. He is winning success for M. 
A. C. on this end of the game. He 
hoops them tbe way the late RaB Fond 
did and the way Em Grayson, present 
Easthampton Interstater, does. Koser 
has a remarkable count so far this seas- 
on, and it is his first year at varsity 
basketball and he is only a Junior; 
much awaits him in bis last year. Per- 
haps the most striking example was 
seen at the Amherst game. Dutch kept 
M. A.C. in the game by the way be 
scored up one by one. He was on deck 
with 19 fouls to his credit. He has the 
most unique method of scoring, for be- 
sides being an expert foul shooter he is 
a nifty little forward, and between fouls 
and floor baskets he makes about 50 
per cent of the Aggies points.'' 



JBow Large is an Atom? 



\TOMS are so infinitesimal that to be seen under the most power - 
J\ ful microscope one hundred million must be grouped. The atom 
used to te the smallest indivisible unit of matter. When the X-Rays 
and radium were discovered physicists found that they _ were dealing 
with smaller things than atoms-with particles they call electrons. 

Atoms arc built up of electrons, just as the solar system is built up 
of sun and planets. Magnify the hydrogen atom, says Sir Oliver 
Lodge, to the size of a cathedral, and an electron, m comparison, will 
be no bigger than a bird-shot. 

Not much substantial progress can be made in chemical and elec- 
trical industries unless the action of electrons is studied. For that 
reason the chemists and physicists in the Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company are as much concerned with the very con- 
stitution of matter as they are with the development of new inven- 
tions They use the X-Ray tube as if it were a machine-gun; for by 
its means electrons are shot at targets in new ways so as to reveal more 
about the structure of matter. ^ 

As the result of such experiments, the X-Ray tube has been greatly 
improved and the vacuum tube, now so indispensable in radio com- 
munication, has been developed into a kind of trigger device for guid- 
ing electrons by radio waves. 

Years may thus be spent in what seems to be merely a purely 
«' theoretical" investigation. Yet nothing is so practical as a good 
theory The whole structure of modern mechanical engineering is 
reared on Newton's laws of gravitation and motion-theone* stated 
in the form of immutable propositions. 

In the past the theories that resulted from purely scientific re- 
search usually came from the university laboratories, whereupon the 
industries applied them. Tlje Research Laboratories of the General 
Electric Company conceive it as part of their task to explore the un- 
known in the same spirit, even though there may be no immediate 
comTercial goal in view. Sooner or later the world profits by such 
research in pure science. Wireless communication, for example, was 
accompHshed largely as the result of Herz's brilliant ^ series ,o purely 
scientific experiments demonstrating the existence of wireless waves. 



Gem 

General Office 




Schenectady, N.Y. 



H-Ml 






JlHRAPY • 



> i r»**«*t9< 



.*•» (< 



CoJleejm 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 23, 1921. 



No. 16 



AGGIE REVIEW IS 

WELL RECEIVED 



M. I. T. FALLS BEFORE 

MAROON AND WHITE 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

OF COLLEGE CHANGED 



Drama and Muaic of Fine Quality 
Draws Record Crowd. 

The first Aggie Bevu« was staged last 
Friday evening befoM an audience thai 

il the capacity of Howker auditor!- 
urn. The atl'air was under t lie manage- 
ment of the Bolster Dolstera, the clasi 
managers co-operating. Much credit is 
due tbe candidates for assistant mana- 
gers, (iuHtave B. B. Mndskog, Benjamin 
Gestae nod Koger B. Friend for their 

valued assistance with the properties. 

To pick out the leading act of the six 
would be a dillicitli task, however the 
class of 11*22. the faculty, the two-year 
class and the class of 1984 deserve 
special mention for their work, as it 
"I out as a thing of polish and 

quality. 

The Sophomores displayed unusual 

ability to put across a musical number 

thai had all the earmarks of classicism 
Those participating were Bobetl A. 
Basil, Robert I). Fuller, Kichard <; 
Wendell, Carroll A. Tow tie, Lawrence 
I liroderick. James S. Bennett, Homer 
F. ltichards, Harry 0. Norcross. and 
Fred <;. Sears. 

ho- two-year class followed with a 
play entitled, "Marriages are made in 
Continued on page 2 



NUMERAL HOCKEY GAME 

GOES TO 1924 1 



Only Tally in Fast Game Comes in 
the First Half. 



Cambridge Five Puts Up Fast Game, 
Losing 21-16. 

For the second lime this season the 
Aggie basketball team won from M.l.T. 
The score of the game Saturday being 
81-10. The game was well advertised 
and the team from Cambridge brought 
a large crowd out to the Drill Hall. 
The playing ol t he M . A . C. <|iiintet wa> 
above the Quality of their opponents 
throughout the game, although Tech 
had a small lead near the liistol the 

game, The work of Touoa for the \is 
I tors wan ed good quality, lie baa been 

playing well all the season ami it was 
with interest that the spectators 
watched the Aggie men keep him 
from scoring more than one liasket. 
The game on the whole was fa-t and 
one of the best played of the season. 

Koser scored the lirst point of the 
game from the foul line, but soon alter 

the Tech team gained a t>l lead. Tins 

was the only lime during t lie game that 
they were ahead. From that point on 
l he Aggie live was invincible and 
played like li team that could unci be 
defeated. At tbe end of the first halt 
the score was 14-M in favor of the home 
team. The second half was a little 
closer but M. 1. T. could not overcome 
the Agyie lead and the score ended 
21-16. The fast floor work of Marshuian 
and Smith was in evidence all through 
both halves. Thompson played well on 

tbe defense and scored one basket from 
the Boor. The best work on the oftcnac 

for M. A. ( I. was turned in by A I Smith. 
Continued on page A 



Falling Off in Personnel of Faculty 
Noticed in New Catalog. 

The new catalogue of the Massachu 
sects Agricultural College has for its 
new features some changes in the re- 
quirements for admission to the courses 
leading to a It. Sc. degree. 

Although one-half additional units 
lot entrance are required I lie terms for 
admission are more lilieral. Bttl ten 
and one-halt units of entrance credit 
are now required through school certiti- 
cation and entrance examination. The 
remaining lour units for admission can 
be satistied by a statement from the 
blgh school piin. ipal thai the work was 
Stedlted toward a diploma. 

Twenty-fout new men appeared in 
the list of the college staff, and If el 
these previously listed are noted to 
have resigned, indicating the effect of 
Insufficient salaries. 

The Institution of the cavalry unil of 
the K. <>. T. C has necessitated a com- 
plete revision in the military instruc- 
tion. The 1'. S. Army has supplied the 
college with :i& cavalry horses and en- 
listed personnel to adequately care for 
them. In addition, two army officers 
have been detailed for instruction ot 
the students. 

EXCELLENT SOCIAL UNION 

ENTERTAINMENT FEB. 26 



Saturday at B-Sfl v v the 1»24 

Hockey team took the Sophomore team 

into camp to the score of 1-0. Lamb. 

who was the 15)24 stellar attraction, 

mule the lone tally, while Goldsmith 

at point played I line brand of hockey. 

For 1928, Smith and Tarr excelled on 

(be offensive, while Wendell and Blbero 

\t a defence which the Frosh could 

not penetrate. The goal tenders did 

not have much work to do as the puck 

»M mostly in mid-rink. During the 

liist half the playing was a little slow, 

and it was not until near the end of the 

od that the Frosh made their tally. 

The second half found the teams play- 

Kood hockey, but due to Sold- 

■mitb's defensive work the puck never 

Ms the yearling's cage. 

I lie lineup: 

1984 WW 

Tewbill, rw lw. Hardy 

!., c c, Mend 

inlay, lw rw, Smith, Tair 

eg ep, Ribero 

p. Wendell 

otirn. g g, baker 

Score — li»24. 1 : 190,0. Score at half 

1'.'24, 1: IBM, I). Coal made by 

Referee -Mansell. Coal judges 

artby and Cotton. Time — 15 

minute halves. 



-mitb, p 
k 



PROF. HASBROUCK ON LEAVE 
OF ABSENCE IN BERMUDA 

Philip B. Hasbrouck, registrar of t be 
college, and professor of Physics wen) 
to Bermuda last week on account of 
poor health. He has been recuperating 

from a long sickness which has forced 
him to leave his duties, but he hopes 
that the change in climate will enable 
him to return to his officio! work in the 
Spring term. 

SQUIB REORGANIZES 

FOR SCHOOL YEAR 

The following new lne " nav '' '"'''" 
elected to the S<jnU> board for the 
sehool year of IBflS t, I*. Bmlth '22, 
Advertising. In the Literary De- 
partment k. < Randall '22, k. w. 

Burke '2:5, B F. Martin W, and F. 
iirunner "24; in the Art Department — 
.1. H. Smith '31,Bmily R. Van Lennup 
21. and R. Noyes'24; in tbe business 
Department-H. K. Weatherwax 24, 
Circulation Manager. E. S. Lamb '24, 
and H. B. Davis '24. Competition for 
the Hoard is open at any time during 
the vear for any of the four-year classes, 
*ad contributions will be gladly re- 
ceived. 



Famous Suwanee River Quartet at 
8. H. at 6-30. 

The Suwanee River (Juartet will give 
an entertainment Saturday. February 
26, 6-30 I'. H, at Slockluidge Hall, under 
the auspices of the Social Union. After 
ten years together this tine quartet 
is more famous than ever. Following 
a long Chautauqua season through N'ew 
E ngla n d and Canada, they are tilling 
one hundred and fifty consecutive lyce- 
11m dates this fall and winter. 

Three of the members of this quartet 
are university graduates and the com- 
pany was formed from a Bible class 
oonducted by John Canlt, its present 
manager. They do not pretend to be 
the best quartet in the world, hut t hey 
are unquestionably the best negro 
quartet In America. 

The program is a composite of the 
different type of negro songs— some 
rollicking, some grave— the old planta- 
tion, jubilee and "camp meeting". 

John Maxwell, tenor, is an excellent 
reader, and offers stories and poems of 
Paul Lawrence Dunbar, the negro poet. 
In addition they form an instrumental 
quartet of banjos, guitars and mando- 
lins, and as a special feature introduce 
character costume songs. 

The whole concert is arranged with 
but one idea— to present a genuine en- 
tertainment. 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

IS BEST IN YEARS 

Nineteen Games Secured, with Ma- 
roon and White Facing Strong- 
est Nines in East. 

The IBB1 baeehall schedule, as an- 
nounced today by Manager Clark, looks 
like the hast list of Aggie diamond 

bookings in years. The schedule 1 - 

sists of nineteen games, six at home, 
one at Prat t Field, and twelve away 
from home, with Amlni>t as the coin 
mencemenl rival al Alumni Field on 
June 11. 

Some ol the si rongOSl nines in the cast 
appear on the list , including such teams 
as Williams, Hiown, Harvard, Tufts. 

Boston University, and Amherst. 
Teams appearing oa this schedule ibia 

Beasoii, which were not played last year, 

include Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 

Williams and Hales, Blown, Harvatd. 

and Beaton University. 

Manager (lark has arranged some 

excellent irips for the nine, Hew York, 
Boston, and Providence being la the 

lisi of stop-overs. The season opens at 
Hobokcn, N. .1., OO April 2D, Stevens be 
ing the lirst opponent of the Maroon 
and White on a three game nip. 

Candidates for varsity baseball will 

probably be called oul about March 7, 

following the clone of the haskelball 
season. Coach QoN and Captain Newell 
will have an excellent nucleus from last 
season and a fast nine should be develop 
ed. In the Ittfteld ihe initial sack will be 
Continued on page 5 



ADDITIONAL CONCERT DATES 
SECURED FOR MUSICAL CLUBS 



Joint Concert With Mt. Holyoke 
Olubs on March 5. 

Saturday night, March lth, the Mm 
steal Clubs will unite with the Mi 
Holyoke clubs in giving a conceit 111 
Student Alumni Hall, Mt. Holyoke 
College. Bank club will give two num 
hers and for a finale all the clubs will 
join in giving one Mt. Holyoke and one 
Massachusetts Aggie sOUg. The con 
eertbeginsat 7-tOaad will be followed 
immediately by dancing until 11-4.V 
The proceeds are to be devoted to the 
Kndowmeiit Fund. A Mt. Holyoke 
orchestra will provide music for dam 
ing, and there will be special cars to 
Amherst following the dance. 

A number of concerts have bOOD al 
ranged for the Musical Clubs during 
the next two months. Friday evening, 
Feb. 26, the clubs will play at the 
Ladies' Night of Ihe Klks in Northamp- 
ton. 

March 16th, the clubs will play at 
Greenfield at a dance given by the Wo 
men's Auxiliary of the k morlcOB 
Legion. April 8th, the clubs will plaj 
in Hardwick. A concert is pending for 
March 9th at Chicopee. 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 23, 1921. 





Tour Choice of 75 Pairs 

MEN'S HIGH-GRADE OXFORDS 

including STETSON, NETTLETON, BOYDEN makes. 

—$15.00 to $20.00 values- 

$10.00 PAIR 

SALE STARTS TO-MORROW (Thursday) MORNING 

E- JS/L. BOLLES 



FACULTY LOSE THEIR 

FIRST GAME 24-10 



AGGIE REVUE 

Continued from page 1 



Gore and Widmayer Headliners in 
Monday Night Contest. 

Monthly Big III anew team set forth 
boot Aggie, in the shape of a faculty 
five, to play a quintet picked from the 
faculty at Amherst College. The M. A. 
0. five played well but were out-classed 
and lost 24-10. The game was fast and 
of course very exciting. Widmayer and 
"Tug" Kennedy were the headliners 
for Amhersi. They showed the result 
of their late training and scored 20 of 
their team's points. 

Burke and Hawley were the Aggie 
men who managed to score, while the 
defensive work of "Kid" Core was true 
lo the methods that he teaches. His 
Hoor work was fast and effective, his 
opponent not being able to break 
through for a try at the basket. lJaw- 
ley showed the results of his recent 
training in class names and as a varsity 
sub. He scored two floor baskets. 
Burke caged the other and also scored 
four fouls. Familiar among the young- 
er alumni on the team were Dowd '20, 
Robertson '20, French 'B> and Hawley 
'19. lieegan and Serex both played left 
forward, but neither the tall entomol- 
ogist nor the stocky scientist were able 
to score, Philbriek, lately from Minne- 
apolis, was another reminder of olden 
days. French is the captain. 
The game was well attended and caused 
a great deal of interest in both colleges. 
The remaining games on the Faculty 
schedule will be watched with this 
same interest. 

The lineups: 
Amherst Faculty 



M. A. C. 

Faculty 
Marsh, If rg, Burke 

Townsend, If rg, Dowd 

Gaus, rf rg, Robertson 

Widmayer, c !g, Gore 

Kennedy, lg c, French 

May, lg rg, Hawley 

Scatchard, rg If, Regan 

Wicher, rg If, Philbriek 

If, Serex 

Baskets from floor— Widmayer 6, 
Hawley 2, Burke. "Gaus, Kennedy and 
Whicher. Baskets from foul— Wid- 
mayer 6 and Burke 4. Referee— flicks 
and Tyler. Time— 17 minute periods. 



Heaven and Elsewhere" by Graham 
Price. Though at times the Irish 
brogue was over done, this minor defect 
was overcome by the splendid acting of 
the entire cast which consisted of: 
Stanley F. Blish, Frederick N.Margreve, 
Katherine L. Powell and Elizabeth F. 
Russell. Much credit for this plays' 
success goes to Professor Patterson who 
coached the production. 

The Senior act though full of possibil- 
ities for a Bnappy show did not stand 
out bo well because of a lack of finish. 
It was very good however, with a dance 
by Jack Smith assisted by Miss Ruth 
Dyer of Mt. Holyoke College at the 
organ as the featuie. Members of the 
ensemble were Peter J. Cascio, Nathan 
\V. Gillette, Emerson F. Haslam, New- 
ton E. Lincoln, Edward B. Newton, 
Lawrence P. Martin, Russell D. Baker, 
Robert L. Starkey, Philip B.Armstrong, 
George W. Edraan, Francis L. Fletcher 
and Charles H. Anderson. 

The Faculty gave a very good presen- 
tation of "The Rising of the Moon", by 
Lady Gregory. The cast consisted of 
Professors Prince, Rand, Phelan and 
Thompson. 

The Freshmen in their act displayed 
a good deal of talent in a romance en- 
titled "Swimming Pools", by Forrest 
Bedford. Those participating were 
Charles Tewhill, Curtis G. Bowes, 
Willard C. Frost, James L. Williams 
and Eliot G. Goldsmith. 

The Juniors gave a play entitled "His 
Methodist Foot" by Vance C. Criss. 
The entire production showed lack of 
work but it was successful because of 
its ludicrous presentation. The cast 
consisted of George A.Cotton, Robert M. 
Hodgson, Reginald N. Holman, Edwin 
G. Burnham, Carl F. Whitaker, Myron 
G. Murray, Harry A. Erysian, George 
B. Packer, and Frederick B. Cook. 

Very entertaining music was furn- 
ished by the college orchestra consist- 
ing of Richard G. Wendell, Maxfleld M. 
Smith, Robert H. Woodworth, Robert 
D. Fuller, Raymond W. Swift, and 
Charles O. Dunbar. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 
LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



A SPECIAL SUIT 

Single or double breasted in a cheerful brown effect, cut form- fit ting, at $50 
for young men. Hand tailored— character in every curve. Individuality 
in every line. Overcoats in very snappy models from $40 to $75. 

MERRITT CLARK & CO. 

Ho ma of Hmi-i Schmffnmr*. Marx Clothaa 

144 Main Street, Northampton 



Mrs. Butterfield gave a reception, to 
Miss Marie Sayles, Head of the Home 
Economics Department, who is leaving 
M. A. C to take a similar position at the 
Ohio State University. 



The Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity held 
an informal house dance Tuesday eve- 
ning. Music was furnished by Daven- 
port's orchestra. Mrs. Ostrander was 
the chaperon. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

COMMITTEE LAYS PLANS 

The officers of the "Altogether', com- 
mittee on Student Activities appointed 
last Sunday were L. P. Martin '31, 
chairman, and James A. Beal '23, sec- 
retary. The subject will be taken up 
with Al Spaulding '17, of Holyoke, and 
Professor Patterson as consultants. 
Subjects such as the conflict of different 
student activities on the campus will be 
considered and suggestions will be 
made for improvements, at the student 
forum. 




IF you would know real smoke contentment, just you smoke 
a W D C Pipe full of your favorite t ibacco. Then you'll 
know what a real French briar is, and what the Demuth 
seasoning will do to make it break in sweet and mellow. 
Ask any good dealer to show you a variety of shapes, then 
pick yours. 

WM. DEMUTH 6l CO.. NEW YORK 

WORLD'S LARGEST MAKERS OF FINE PIPES 



1 he Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 23, 1921. 



IT IS HANDY - 

To be able to drop in between classes for "ice the pie" and hot coflee at the Inn. 
EINN -Tobacco, Students' Supplies, Candy, College and Fraternity Bannerr 
and Pennants. 



THREE RACES RUN IN 

INTERFRATERNITY SERIES 



Sigma Phi Epsilon Makes the Best 
Time ; 2:15 2-5. 

luterfraternity relay races began last 
Tuesday afternoon with a pep which 
bodies well for keen competition among 
the fraternities on the easnpos. Sulli- 
van held the watch, while Benny Cray 
and Nan ford were judges. The tirst 
race was between Kappa Cnmma Phi 
and Theta Chi. Theta (hi gained the 
inside of the track early in the race, 
and keeping this advantage thrnugti- 
oiit won by a few feet. Tiip men in t he- 
order in which they ran are: 

TIIKTA < III 



TELLS OF THE RURAL 

CONDITIONS OF SERBIA 



KAIMW O.VMMA 1*111 

l.ockwood Preston 

Frost Collins 

Bowes \uttini: 

Hallet West 

Won by Theta Chi. Time- 2.24 4-5. 

The second race, between Ni^tna Phi 

Kpsilon and Lambda Chi Alpha, was 

the fastest of the day. Sigma Phi 

Kpsilon won by a few feet. The teams : 

SIOMA PHI KI'HII.ON 1.AMIIDA < HI AI.I'IIA 

Blanchard Kemp 

Alexauder Loring 

Gifford Barrows 

KollinB Merle 

Won by Sigma Phi Kpsilon. Time— 
2.15 2-5. 

The third race, between Alpha Stgmsa 
l'hi and Alpha Gamma Kbo. was won 
by the latter. The teams: 

ALPHA GAMMA HIIO ALPHA RIOMA Pill 

Davis Hayes 

Hurd Hoi way 

Stevenson Bliss 

Acbeson Roirell 

Won by Alpha Gamma Blio Time— 
2.17 4-5. 

In the second series of interfraterniu 
relay races, which were scheduled t<> l>e 
run last Thursday, the race between 
Alpha Sigma Phi and Lambda CM 
Alpha was postponed to Feb. fl. owing 
to a hole in the track. The Phi Nigma 
Kappa and <}. T. V. rare was postponed 
to March 1, The only race run. be- 
tween Alpha Gamma Kho ami Kappa 
Blgna), was declared no race by Coach 
Dickinson because of a technical foul. 
It will be run at some future date 



Bishop Nicholai Is Assembly Speaker. 

Hishop Nicholai of the Greek Ortho- 
dox Church in Serbia gave a very in- 
I teresting talk to the students at as- 
, senihly last Wednesday. He spoke 
chiefly about agricultural conditions in 
Serbia. He said that ninety-rive percent 
of the Serbian population is agricultual, 
and that the peasants of his country, 
as in all other Kun.pean countries, 
hale party politics. In Russia, for ex- 
ample, the peasantry are entirely un- 
interested in politics. Only the town 
people are Bolshevists. 

In all Kurope there is much animosity 
between the nobility and t lie peasantry. 
Blghtf to niuety per cent, of the suffer- 
ers by war were peasants. Then, too, 
i lie peasants resent the greed of the in- 
tellectual and governing classes, be- 
cause they take practically all the state 
moneys, and expend very little of it in 
imp roving rural conditions. 

He said that the Seibi;n peasantry 
was the finest in Kurope. Most Serbian 
peasants own their owu lands and 
homes, and pay their own taxes. Since 
the war, much new territory has been 
added to Serbia, and in part of this new 
territory ,uc peasants still live under 
the Old feudal system. The ureal na- 
tional problem in Serbia is to extend 
the old Seibian farm life to the new 




You fellows at If. A.C who are strong 
for lab, will naturally be interested in 
our test for all-wool. 

A sample of eveiv piece of cloth we 
receive is boiled in caustic potash, which 
as Dr. C. II. Kmisirv knits, completely 
disintegrate! animal matter (wool;. 

If the sample disappears, all's wool — 
and all's well ! 

But! 

If ihe slightesi residue remains, indi- 
cating vegetable mallei (cotton), it's all 
off as far as Rogers Peet is concerned 
we're an absolutely all-wool house. 

The best of everything college men 
wear. 

Rogkrs Pkkt Company 



Broadway 




Broadway 


at ISta St 


•'Four 
Convenient 


at Mtfa Si 


Broadway 


Corners" 


Fifth Ave. 


at Warren 




al 41st St. 




NKW YORK Cm 





PREXY SPEAKS ON IMPORT- 
ANCE OF ACTIVITIES 

President Butterfield addressed the 
college at Monday morning's chapel 
exercises, Feb. 21. His subject was "To 
what extent should a man dissipate bis 
college activities". This question is 
broached from time to time and Prexy 
wishes to devise a plan whereby the 
faculty can get in touch with the stu- 
dent problems. Although there are 
some on the faculty who think athletics 
are necessary nuisances, yet this num- 
ber Is in the minority. Most of the 
professors feel that student activities 
should not only be tolerated, but that 
Ibey should also be encouraged. Grad- 
uates look back upon their college ac- 
tivities and value them more than the 
knowledge gained from mere books. 
In connection with this phase of the 
'luestion, Prexy read a few interesting 
passages from President Meikeljohn's 
new book, "The Liberal College. 



provinces. 

Serbia lost over a million of her peo- 
ple in the war and consequently is very 
Short of men. It is the only country in 
I he woild where there rue no unem- 
ployed. 

DEAN LEWIS PAYS 

TRIBUTE TO LINCOLN. 

Dean Lewis addressed the student 
body at chapel Friday morn Feb. 18. 
He spoke as a t ri Line In the "Spirit of 
Lincoln." There was D, mocracy in the 
American spirit of Lincoln. He was a 
genius with a simple, honest soul and 
on this account was a leader among 
men. Tolstoi, i be great Russian nove- 
list said of him, '•Lincoln was a second 
Christ." Il was impossible to depicl 
Lincoln to the sat islact ion of the aver- 
age man. Homely and awkward— yet 
he had the most beautiful face ever 
Me*. We as a nation idolize and 
cherish him. Lincoln the master of 
men. spoke plain Knglisb and has writ 
ten sonic of the Knglish masterpieces of 
the world. He was a great humorist. 
All he did characterized the doings of a 
great and go,,d man. He was a living 
example of humility on Ihe one hand 
ami great good hearted ucss on the other. 
We seed the spirit of Lincoln in 
America today. Lincoln would not 
countenance the spirit of anti-semitism, 
which is raging l« America today. He 
would do Ins utmost to provide har- 
mony. We must reluse to indulge in 
propaganda ami beautify and sweeten 
our democracy, b closing Dean Lewis 
said : At M. A. C, are we leading the 
happiest and most harmonions life? 
1 el as all pull together and not miss 
lh( . best of our college life. In this way 
we will attain the spirit of Lincoln at 
M. A. C. " 

. 18 _GeorKe P. Cotton was on the 
campus last Friday. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerficu. Mas* 



tore 



F*«Ke>'« Shoe 

SPECIAL 



$14.00 Brogue Oxfords, now $10.00 

Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 

Shaving Sticks and Creams Razors and Razor Blades 

VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



MORANDI - PROCTOR COMPANY 
Manufacturers [ ns titutioi* Cooking Apparatus 

86 WASHINGTON *T. BOSTON 



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PRINTERS, 

No I, Cook Place, Amherst, Mass 



The M— •chmette Collegian, Wednesday, February 23, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 23, 1921. 







THE MASSACHUSETTS C0LLE6IAN 



PnbHsttOd every Wednesday by the 
Student* of the MaHK.l< tiusetts Ar- 
riciiltuial Collage. 

UOAK1) OF EDITORS. 



I. a. kk.n< k I'. Makiin tl. KdUor in-Cblef 

BoeSSt I.. .Joni'.s "21 Managing Kdttor 

Abbociatk Kimtokh. 

Hoiiaim W. |f»H •*•-' . Ass't NlB'l K<litor. 

CiKOKOK W. Kl'MAN '21 

KENNK1II A. IURNAK1> 'Tl 
STANI.r.V \V. Hkomiky fl 

BBUMM K. Jackson "22 

.l.illN M. WllllTlKH '2S 
I,. B. AlllllNOTON '-a 



HlIBINKBH PtCPAKTMK.NT. 

HUM I.. OK.ru '21. Business Manager 

ImH i C. MROI tl Advertising Manager 

Chaki.k* A. BOOI tt < iroulation Manager 

MTBOX <:. Mi »"AV tl 

l|oLI>KN Willi TAKKK "-'» 

OWRN K. I'ol.SoM "■ 



SubBcription $a.<H) per year. Single 
copieg, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-class matteratthe Amherst 
Post Offire. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section U0». Act 
of October. tfH authorized August 20. 1918. 



The New Rushing Benson. 
That tb« fraternities have linally de- 
rided to adopt the seeond term rushinn 
season It an established fact. But the 
ways and means of putting this season 
into effect has been productive so far of 
little but talk. There exists as many 
different ways of pull ing Hie idea into 
effCO) as there are men in college. The 
task of sorting and classifying these 
ideas is ■ herculean task which belongs 
to (he Interfraternity Conference. Bui 
t<> date there seems to be no detinite 
scheme of action except that each and 
every group lias a different idea all its 
own and is fostering that idea with a 
"I won't play if you don't do as I say" 
spirit. There seems to exist a mutual 
spirit of suspicion. Apparently no one 
has any faith in the other fellow and 
his motives. Th< existence of an Honor 
System at M. A. C. has been apparently 
forgotten. 

To date, the dleeaasloos have appar- 
ently BOtted nothing except a quib- 
bling over details. In some cases the 
fact that th" change is to be a second 
term season has been forgotten. The 
basic reason for the change has been 
forgotten. The substitution of large 
doses of class and college spirit for fra- 
ternity spirit at the crucial period in the 
college year with the result in a proper 
start for all activities and more espec- 
ially the freshmen themselves, is, in 
the 'mind of the writer, the good result 
which will grow <»» t ,,f ,l,e ebange 
already decided upon. The methods 
with which this will be accomplished 
will necessarily be difficult, for the first 
year at least. But the substitution of 
a belief in the other fellow's integrity 
for the present spirit of distrust will 
help smooth out many wrinkles. And 
throughout the whole performance the 
prime object of the change must not be 
forgotten -the development of college 
spirit. 

Books. 

Reading courses at M. A. C. are on 

the list of those things to be avoided by 

the unthinking. Little do they realize 

the value that comes from an intimate 



knowlede of what books may have to 
say on any subject. "There is nothn.g 
new under the sun," and it is all to be 
found in books if the reader only knows 
where to look. Thousands of articles 
and even volumes have been written on 
the proper use of books. But yet, very 
few students at M. A. C. seem to have 
been exposed to these articles suffic- 
iently to have become inoculated. A 
brief survey of the occupants of the li- 
brary during any period of the day will 
bear out this statement. Seventy five 
per cent of those who may be found in- 
carcerated within its wails are there 
from compulsion. The other M% are 
there to kill time. Their reading con- 
sists in whatever fiction and current 
news matter that may be gleaned from 
the material on display. To be 
sure, neither group are entirely wasting 
their time. 

Hut there is still another group who 
are never to be found within the li- 
brary walls except when forced logo 
there. They spend their idle moments 
in wondering how to pass the time. It 
is to this group that this editorial is 
addressed. The librarian lias accumu- 
lated a collection of books Ofl almost 
every subject under the sun. They are 
for you to use. There are adequate 
ways and means of finding the partic- 
ular bit of information that you may be 
curious to know. The next time you 
get a "bolt.' drift over that way and 
have Mr. Green or one of bis assistants 
help you to look up the answer to that 
"bull-fesl" you had down to the house 
last night. You will be surprised to 
learn how easy it will be and how much 
there is there to know on the subject. 

In this connection the Coi.l.KOlAN 
wishes to take the opportunity to con- 
gratulate Mr. (ireen on his unique adap- 
tation of the traveling library idea to 
local conditions. It would be well for 
other College librarians to follow his 
lead. Its success at M. A. C. was imme- 
diate. It is a splendid idea. 



COMMUNICATION 



The Schedule. 
Within the next few weeks the sched- 
ule committee, the schedule or any- 
thing pertaining to or about the sched- 
ule will be "crabbed" from one end of 
the campus to the other. This is not 
unusual, it is traditional. But there 
are several facts to be brought to the 
attention of the "crabbers". There are 
only just bo many "guts", that any 
one man can, as a rule, take in 
the same term. The standard sched- 
ule was developed .witb the idea 
in mind that students who really 
wished to work along certain lines could 
pursue this line of endeavor throughout 
the entire three terms. Have a proper 
regard for the man w^>o is majoring in 
some other course beside your own. If 
you have a real kick go around and 
see the schedule committee. They are 
holding office hours for the purpose of 
listening to the stories of men who have 
legitimate reasons for "crabbing." 
You will be given real consideration. 



A Resignation. 
It is with regret that the board an- 
nounces the resignation of Paul L. Bur- 
nett of the editorial department. The 
staff feels that when collegiate duties 
conflict with college activities that the 
latter should be dropped. It is with 
regret that the staff accepts the resig- 
nation. 



There is to be a faculty entertainment 

Saturday night at Room 114,Stockbridge 

Ball. A one-act play will be presented 

at that time. 

t 



To T1IK KniTOB OK TIIK CoI.I.KO I A N : 

In last weeks issue an article ou the 
uneasiness of the college, created a- 
mong the student body and facutly 
such comment and discussion that I 
feel some facts would awaken the 
students as to what the position is they 
now tind thetuselveB in. 

The gentleman that wrote this article, 
seems to have a very Buperfical outlook 
upon the whole situation. It seems that 
the main criticism is upon the athletic 
status upon campus. It appears that 
he who can criticise the running of the 
athletic program in this college without 
any facts to back up this article should 
consider rather seriously just what he 

is to say. 
Our athletics have been run by men 

who have put in untiring effort with 
little or no thanks and very little com- 
pensation. They have worked under 
the most trying conditions and circum- 
stances and for a dozen years their work 
has been above reproach. To edit such 
an article ai» appeared last week is an 
insult to the men and their work ami 
an apology should be demanded. What 
would we do without these men? 
Where would this college be on the 
collegiate map? Who is it that has 
kept harmony and peace along this line 
when practically chaos reigned along 
others? 

Fellow students, it is about time we 
woke up and began to investigate 
matters and appreciate the real value 
of these men and their work. 

N'ow as to the position of athletics in 
college among other activities. Who is 
it that the Freshman look up to when 
they tirst appear upon <-ampu>? Who 
sets the standards or ideals for them to 
work for? What is it among college 
activities that advertises this college 
the most? Is it debating. Glee clubs, 
Roister Doisters, and the like? Kb I it 
is athletics! and take it down from its 
high pinnacle and we will find a student 
body that would be unworthy of the 
name of men of M. A. C. 

Do not think that I be-little the non- 
athletics, for I am juBt as much inter- 
ested in those activities but lime does 
not permit participation, although they 
have my heartiest support. 

Now the gentleman asks: "Are ath- 
letics taking too much time from 
studies? Caste a glance at the scholas- 
tic records of the athletes past and 
present and if their average does not 
better those of men in non-athletics and 
the "Lounge Lizards", then the statis- 
tical department is in error. What 
gives the man the incentive to study ? 
What keeps his mind clear and his 
body fit? How can any clear thinking, 
level-headed, red-blooded American 
deny that it is athletics? 

The gentleman infers that the athlete 
will not find time to do all the reading 
he desires, or do all the little odd taskB 
that he must do. The only question 
asked here is 'How many athletes 
working their way through college, and 
nearly 75% are, how many I ask are 
flunking out?' 

He finally asks, "To what extent are 
fraternities injuring college sprit?" 
Gentlemen, the reason for the uneasi- 
ness of the student body, the cause of 
the skeptical faculty, the reason for all 
the protests is the fraternities. There 
is more un-gentlemanly, under- handed, 
dirty politics going on about college to- 
day than has ever been here before. 
The whole tendency ih fraternity first 
and college where it can find a place. 

Now let us get together and pull as 
one man for the interests of the college 
and raise our fast slipping ideals out of J 



SELECT CATERING 

— at — 

Reasonable Prices 

D)r$- Cassiti 



Tel. 566-M 

12 SOUTH PROSPECT STREET 
Amherst, Mass. 



This is to be a big season for 

SASH EIBBONS 

We can show you the 

MOST UP-TO-DATE STYLES 

— iu- 

Roman Stripes, Plaids, 
Brocades and Plain 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A. C. Men 

Next Assembly, FRIDAY, Feb. 25, at 8 p.m. 

Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

PRIVATE LESSONS IN DANCING 

Men taught to lead by quickest method- 
Inquiries mi Mill* Studio, 

P. O. Buildintc. Phone Wll 



PAPER CITY ENGRAVING CO., Inc. 



Makers of High-grade Cuts for all 
kinds of Publications. 



RADCLIFFE BUILDING 

Phone 700 

Holyoke, Mass. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

College Jewelry-Cuff Links. Soft Collar Plm 
Dress Suit Sets. Violin. Banjo. Mandolin Strings 

Fin* Watch Repairing, also Breken Lento 

Replaced Promptly. 

32 Male Street. Asakerst. »»«•• 

SHMG LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



ALBERT B. BIAS 

CATERING FOR 

Proms, Bats, Informal Dances 

Also SANDWICHES SOLD 

At FRATERNITIES EVERY NIGHT 



Suits Pressed, 65c 

on Sanitary Pressing Machine. 

LABROVITZ, 11 Amity Street 




Why doe s a chameleon change its color ? 

Why does Christmus jewelry turn green in the Spring? 

WALSH merchandise never changes color. 

MORAL: Brer ami Always, CONSULT WALSH 



: he mire and pal them up on <lry land 

«r here they rightfully belong. Lotus 

all lie real Aggie men worthy of the 

name. ll. C. '22. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

[n response lo the nwnerons requests, 
the Department of agricultural Eco- 
nomies announces for the epring tern a 
leralnar, Agricultural Economics 63, on 

publicity ami salesmanship as applied 

tgrioaltoral product*. This seminar 

i> open to approved undergraduates 
who have taken elective courses in ag- 
ricultural economics of graduate slu- 

< if ii i s who have had equivalent courses 

in economics or commerce. The class 

will use as a text Kfjrstrom'i Economics 

• Entailing anil one or two works on 

lalesmsnship and trill meet one hour a 
week for discussion of specific problems. 

\ minimum of live tonus r»f work mi! 

mI class will be required weekly : ■ final 
initiation may lie required Two 

■ leilitH. 

The n at me o4 (he work from the stu- 
dents' view point may he ascertained 
l>v Interview! Dg any of the men BOH 
electing the seminar, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 81, on agricultural advertising, 

A l.l.\A Mill! E. Cahcb. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

PtaSM leave any notices forthil ealemlar In 
,• bn in I lie < 'on I i.i A \ nttii ■«■ ilcn.i . 

ITBMI I ID \ v, Fkis. 88. 
3 in r. m. Assembly. Speaker to he 
announced. 

Tin lisiiw, This. 24. 

T oti r. m.— Meeting of Landscape olub 
iii Wilder Hall. 

7 imi i«. m.— Koister Dotstei Rehearsal. 
(lark Hall. 

x-IMI i\ m. — Varsity b askell.all. St. Law- 
rence vs. M. A. C, Drill Hall. 

B vi tiitiAv, Pan. 2d. 

7-00 p. m. — Social Union Program, So- 
wanee Uiver Quartet, Bowker 

A uditoiium. 

Si;m>ay. Fkk. 2". 
i'-iMi a. h, Sunday Chapel, Speaker. 

Kev. Xebemiah Boynton, 

Brooklyn, K.Y. 
Tikshw. Mai:cii 1. 
7 -oo f. m.— Roister Doister Rehearsal, 

Clark Hall. 

Wkdxkkha v. Mak< ii 8, 
MO P. m. — Assembly. Speaker to he 
announced. 



AGRICULTURAL MISSIONS 
CONFERENCE HERE IN APRIL 

A student conference on Agricultural 
Mission! will be held at t lie colletre 
April H-10 with delegates from the col- 
- and graduate schools of New Eng- 
land and tbe East. Speakers such as 
HiUKinbottom. who are familial 
with this form of Christian service; will 
" its opportunities. M. A. < 
• host of this gathering, extends a 
cordial invitation to all interested. 
conference is to be one of tbe 
"' M planned for the observance of the 
centennial anniversary of thecol- 
lt is held under the direction of 
■i'fernational Association of Agri- 
cultural Missions. 



NEEDS OF THE CHRISTIAN 
LIFE,' SPEAKERS THEME 



Rev. W. H. Day of Bridgeport Occu- 
pies Sunday Platform. 
At Sunday Chapel, Feb. 20, Dr. Wil- 
liam II. Day ut Bridaeport, Coon., ad- 
dressed the students on the needs of 

the < briatian life, lie took for his 
scripture lesson the passags "A-k and 

it shall he given you, seek ami y* shall 
tind. knock and l| ihall be opened unto 

you." lie explained tins m represent' 
lag tbe need for prayer, thought, and 
action in well rounded Christian living, 
Life la a race which must be run with 

patience, looking towards Christ, the 
captain and coach. 

Life is an adventure, and all kinds of 
living may supply in part, bu man crav- 
ing for adventure, The natural long* 
Ingisfor physical adventure, but this 
should be eoobled bj material ami 
spiritual adventure. In Illustration he 

told of Dr. titeufell.wlio has won lame 
in Lis Wonderful service to the natives 

ot Labrador. As ■ boj Qronfell fell 

that be could be happy in physical 

prowess, and planned for a life of tlgoi 
hunting. The lie became inteiesled in 
the study «i| medicine, and experienced 
happiness in mental achievement. At 

length be found the highest expression 

of his ability in spiritual development, 

and he has achieved happiness in a life 

II sacrifice. 

Dr. Day warned students to live up 

to theit high ambii ions, and particu- 
larly not to grow discouraged in the 

lace of actual difficulties. He said that 
from a mountain top the heights of the 
tar oil promised land look easy to reach 
but when we descend lo the valley and 
fared the hardships of the long up hill 
climb, the goal of our ambitions seemed 
far away. It is then onl.v too easy to 
give up. and unless we look ahead and 
Upward to our captain we cannot lie 

true lo our bast kelvee, 

BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

Continued from page 1 

covered by a veteran, while two outfield 
berths are vacant. Of last season's pilcb- 

eis, liiiu'ham, Kioeck and Lent will all 
be available, and probably with the ad- 
dition of some rei -i nit slabsters from the 

freshman and sophomore classes. The 

well balanced, representative sched- 
ule and six of last year's team back, 

Men to be t he conditions requisite for a 
successful season. 

The sch' dule: 
April 90 Stevens Institute at Hohoken 
21- Brooklyn P. I. at Brooklyn 

" KB— Williams at Wllliamatown 

27- \V. P. I. at Worcester 

21' C. A. ('. at Slorrs 

N i:. I. Mate at Kingston 

Ma] •"» Batei at If. A. 0. 

7 C. A, C. at M. A. C. 
il — Brows at Providence 

' 12- W. P. I. at M. A. <'. 

IS— Trinity at Hartford 

14— Harvard at Cambridge 
" 20— Boston I'liiversity at Boston 
" 21— Tufts at Medford 

2") Amherst at Pratt Field 

2H Union at M. A. C. 
" to— Springfield at Springfield 
June 4— Boston University at M. A. C. 
" 11— Amherst at M. A. C. 



SENATE APPOINTS HOOPER 

'22 CHEER LEADER 



1923-1024 Banquet Rules Under 
Consideration. 

The Senate met last Tuesday night at 
ii 48 and decided upon tbe following 
courses of action. Hides for the coming 
annual Preshmau<8opaomore banquet 
se.is.m have been formulated and will 
be presenled lo the two classes which 
will participate, in the near future 
The Senate decided to postpone the 

\ una parly until the Sophomores had 

formulated some original plans for the 

affair, The Senate appointed Hooper 
'22 varsity cheerleader. He will take 
up his duties a> such in t he near future. 
Hooper went out for the assistant cheer- 
leadership last spring and qualified 
from the very start. He is a graduate 
of Severe Hi^h Be boo), and has been a 
popular man on t he campus, heing es- 
pecially prominent in class athletics, 
lie is a member of the Sigma Phi Kpsi- 
loii fraternity. 



AUTHOR OF "REAL 

PREACHING" TO SPEAK HERE 



Rev. Nehemiah Boynton of Brooklyn, 

N. Y , is Next Sunday's Chapel 

Speaker. 

At Sunday t'hapel Feb. 27 Kev. 
S'eheiniah lioynlonof Brooklyn, N. V., 
will address the students. Mr. Hoynion 
was horn in Medford, Mass., in lHotl 
He graduated from Amherst College in 
1H7II. and from Amlover Theological 
Seminary In inx2. la l*i»4 he received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Amherst. He was ordained in tbe 
Congregational ministry in 1H82 and 
has been pastor in several Massachu- 
setts churches. For ten years he 
preached in Detroit, Until, in liMHl, he 
became pastor of Clinton Avenue 
Chunk in Brooklyn, N. V. From BM2- 
1017 he was chaplain in the 18th De- 
fense Co., National Guard, New York, 
and in 1M17 he joined the Federal Ser- 
vice. He is the author of " Leal 
Preaching." 



LIBRARY REPORT FOR 1920 

The annual report of the library for 
the year ending Nov. B0, 1920, gives 
some interesting data, showing juBt 
how much has been accomplished. 
The library was open lo students dur- 
ing H4»i days, the remaining 19 heing 
Sundays during the summer months, 
and holidays. At the beginning of the 
year, there were 01480 volumes in the 
library. At the end of the year, Hfifi 
volumes had been added to the collect- 
ion, 12W8 of those being gifts. 018 news- 
papers and periodicals were currently 
received. 

A tine record is shown in the use to 
which the books were put. 812ft vol- 
umes were lent for home use, and in 
the library extension service, 374 books 
and 47 bulletins were sent to 2!) libra- 
ries. 

In the inter-library loan service, 29 
volumes wereborrowed,from 7 libraries, 
and 12 volumes were loaned to 6 
libraries. 




MARSH'S SANITARY 

Students' Furniture 

RUOS AND CARPETS 

— K. I). MAItHII KHTATK — 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good tilings to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 415-Wl lUdley. Mass. 

S. S. HYDE 

OgStlofansa «»•»<! Jewolrc 
'.) Pleasant Street (up one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big; Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 



Kulljr Guaranteed 



N0VICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. Tel. 9-J 

Petnwlf < oluinlila ( aff. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 



Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1921 TO 1924 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst Mass. 

S " 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 23, 1921. 




FRESHMEN DEFEAT 

NORTHAMPTON HIGH 9-8 

Game Marked By Defensive Play of 
Both Taams. 
The Fivsliinan basketball tCCM d«> 
teated ,lie ,:isl Northampton i>is;>> 
tehool lease last sat unlay efteraooB In 
ihe Drill Hall by I lie eloseceOM of &&. 
The Northampton icacj, was nata* the 

live-man defCBOC ami therefore it was 
M Strong on the dcfCBCC as was the 

Freshman team. At the end of the lirsl 
half, the MOW was 4-:i in favor of the 
Freshmen. However, in the second 
half, the superior foul choottag of 
Harrows and a ioof basket by Kane 
won the name for the Freshmen. 

The II neap: 

Noirrn ami-ton Ihoii 

l<r, Cerratl 

r<;, Harger 

e, /aekrewski 

If, Oordoa, O'Cooaal 
if, Beeellioa 

duals fro m Bool Kane J. /aekrewski 
2. dais from fouls Harrows 6, 0'CoB- 
nel 2, Hassilion 2. Iteleiee Williams. 

Bean ISMSi Northampton high school 

8. 



The Maaaachu settB Collegian, Wedneadty, February^l921. 

Amherst House Shoe Repairing 



he found in the Bad Lands Of South 
Dakota showed four toes on the fore 
feet aud three toes on the rear feet. 
Another which he exhumed in the Hin 
linttes of Colorado showed four toes 
both la the front and in the rear feet. 
The wild ponies of Russia were also 
shown, and Professor Loo in is said that 
scientists are now convinced that this 
type of horse is closely related to the an- 
eient horse which dwelt in No. America 
several millions of years a«o, and which 
crossed over into Asia by way of the 
land which at that time connected 
America with Asia. The lecture was 
enjoyed by about 75 students. 

FRESHMEN WIN NINTH 

GAME OF LAST ELEVFN 



Shorn 
Repairing 



Shorn 

Shlnm 



X. MIENTKAS 



— TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

IS Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



I Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
up some real Bargains in 

HI6H GRADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and styles of shoes, 
You can't afford to miss this BALE] 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing done bj 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. On your way up tows 



Fkksii MK.N 
Kane, it 
Barrows, If 
\Veattnrwa\. «■ 
Hairston, rg 
Salmon, In 



ILLUSTRATED LECTURE AT 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB 

A lecture was gifCfl at the Animal 
Husbandry CI BO meeting last Wednes- 
day evening Feb. l»i. in Sloekbridne 
Hall by 1'rofessor Loom is, of the Biol- 
ogy Department at Amherst Collage. 
He spoke on* the " Kvol lltion of the 
Horse." and illustrated his talk with 
numerous slides. 1'rofessor Loomis 
showed slides presenting <»e restora- 
tion of two horses, the skeleton remains 
of which lie bad unearthed inoiieof 
his expeditions to the Western lands of 
the United Males. One animal, which 



TOWN HALL 

Thursday 



Sacred Heart Falls; Score 19-16. 
The Freshmen defeated the Sacred 
Heart High School basketball team Fri- 
day evening, Feb. IK, in the Holyokc 

high sel I tiyinnasinm with a score of 

19-16. This game was the ninth victory 
for the Freshmen in their last eleven 
garnet. The game bega* rather slowly, 
the Freshmen belBg unused to a lame 
Moor and the Sacred Heart team beiiiK 
unable to penetrate the perfect defence 
ottered hy the Freshmen. 

Roberts, the left forward of Sacred 
Heart, was the best player of the op 
ponents. He scored three-fourths of 
Sacred Heart's points. The pass work 
of the Freshmen featured the game. 

The lineup: 
Fkehiimkn Sacked Hkakt 

Kane, If lg, J. Sullivan 

Barrows, Whitman, rf rg, F. Sullivan 
Weatherwax, Barrows, c 

c, Sheehan, Roberts 
Hairston, rg If, Roberts, Monohan 

Salmon, Ig "i Walker 

Qoaai from Moor: Kane, Barrows 2, 
Weatherwax. Hairston, J. Sullivan, F. 
Sullivan, Roberts 4 duals from fouls: 
Barrows 9, Roberta 4. Referee- Beagaa. 
Score- 1934 IS, Sa.red Heart high 
school BJ. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCV GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 






Hat. at 3 

Eve. I sbowi 

6-45. 8-30 



Friday 



Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Marshall Neilim'* wondefru' 
plctnrtzation of James Oil- 
vei < urwood's. fasnous story. 
•'The Ruer'« fend." with 
Lewis Stone. Jane NovaK 
and Harjorte Daw. Ons of 
the moal 1 h i<l and vital tales 
of the Northwest ever* ritten. 

Newt, Topics. Mutt and Jeff 

Eddie Lyons ami Lee Horan 

'the two well-known \.iuile 
ville headltners) In "La La 
Lucille." based >>n the musi- 
cal eomedj hit. the swiftest 
moving far s aver screened I 
A hi! ". . the atage: A sen-am 
on thf screen : 

Scenic reel. "Let 'er Go." 
it-reel Mac* Sennett Comedy 



NEW ARRIVALS 

Golf Hose Golf Knickers Golt Suits 

RIDING BREECHES, Corduroy and Khaki 

New Neckwear New Caps 

Interwoven Sox, now 40c 

Interwoven SilKs, now 75c 
Tyson White Shirts, now $3.00 



F, M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner $ Marx Clothes 



M. I. T. BASKETBALL GAME 

Continued from page 1 



1 



Saturday 



Hat. at 3 

Eve.— I Shows 
6-45.8-30 



Dorothy Gish ami her brand 
new husband. James Rennte 
formerly of the Northampton 
flayers In Remodelling Her 
Husband." All about a tlir- 
tattoos husband and a bride 
wild a mind of her own— a 
rollicking co m — If . 

" The Kin* of the Circus " 
News Comedy 



Monday 

Hat. at 3 
Eve. at 8 



Clara Kimball Young in 
"Hush," h> Bads < owsn.su- 

thoresa of " Why < hange Your 
Wife." 



Pathe Review, I -t eel Comedy 



High Grade 



COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



The speedy Junior was plavinu at top 
speed ami, as in the last name or so, is 
■bowing (bill he is in the prime of his 
career. His four well placed baskets 
Hum the HOOT came at the right limes 
and helped materially in keeping up 
the tight in the team. Marshinan's 
work was also very good. This tall 
youuji.-ler showed the form that is go- 
ing to make hi in a star in the next two 
years. lie added six points to his 
learns total, scoring three baskets after 
speedy Boot work had brought the ball 
down near the basket. Captain Gowdy 
played his usual consistent game and 
Roisr added live points from the foul 
line. The lineup: 

M. A. C. M - '■ '• 

Boost, rf ll >. Tooon 

smith, if, »*i Habbord 

Marsh man, «. Bretting 

Thompson, rb If, Saudis 

Oowdy, lb rf, Buyer 

Baskets from Moor— Smith 4, Marsh- 
man S, Thompson, Tonon. Hrettin", 
Landis. and Boyer I, Baskets from 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Farming history shows that over-productionandlowprlces 
one year are almost invariably followed by much smaller 
crops and higher prices the next. To the far-seeing farmer 
this means opportunity. While others wait, he octs. He 
plants; and when the rise comes his crops are grown. 
Do you see the situation in that light? 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers are ready to hel p. They are 
good fertilizers — formulated, mixed, 
cured right. They'll not only give 
your crops a quick start, but they'll 
keep right on feeding them to suc- 
cessful maturity. The very best in- 
gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 
of manufacturing experience go into 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers. 



— AT 

Economy Prices 
EI. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



foul -Boser 5 and TonoB o. 



Order now for Spring planting. If wa've 
no dealer near you, vrite for the agency. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., Inc. 

Bub'idiar* ol The American Agricultural ChetnUml 0*. 

51 Chambers St. New York City 



HAT Is ft ssfs crop. «ss- 
117 (rowo. hsndUd, 
stored. Always msrkeUbto. 
Or, feed It Sod also sn- 
riches loll for next crop. A 
reasonable application of BL 
Frank Coe's Special Top 
Dressing should nearly 
double yield. Mention your 
soils and write for Yaluabto 
book "The Neslected Hay 
Crop." Ires, with our f«- 
Ulixer suggestions. 



•jo —Mr. and Mrs. S. I). Leilmiati of 
11 Harlem street, Dorchester, announce 
the marriage of their daughter Anna to 
John I). Shores of New York City. The 
ceremony took place February 9 at the 
home of the bride's parents. Mb* 
Leihman graduated at M. A. ('. in the 
class Of l'.Hit, and has been employed M 
a chemist for the past year in Boston. 



E.FRANK COES 



Req.U S Pat. Off. 



Fertilizers 

Increase the yield of every field 



COLLEGE STORE—Whereyouboughtthebittersweets 



We carry a full line of 

Students' Appliances 



G. H. RUMERY, Electrician 

THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 

IN 

SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

Give as a trial; 



If its for HAT RENOVATING, 
GLOVE CLEANING or SHOE 
DYEING, CONSULT THE COL- 
LEGE SHOE -SHINE PARLOR 
BY THE AMER. EX. OFFICE. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pen* 



C. F. DYER 



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CAMPUS NOTES 

The Theta Chi fraternity held a 
house dance Tuesday evening. Music- 
was furnished by Frost's orchestra. 

Professor Welles is to give a five 
credit course in Agricultural Kducation 
61, "I'l-im-iples and Methods of Teach- 
ins;", next term at 11 O'clock. 

Professor BMQJBOnt and Mi. Thelin 
attended Union Agricultural nsccttogs 
last week la Boston, and visited labora- 
tories of a Federal grain Supervisor. 

Mr. Carl L. Beats, Experiment Sta- 
tion Investigator, is on a year's leave of 
absence. He will be with the Sheffield 
Farm By-Products Co. at Hobart.N. Y. 

Professor Hart is to give a tin., 
credit course in Agricultural Kducation 
»U, "(ienetic Psychology" next term, 
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fiidays at 
8 o'clock. 

George Campbell '20, of the Alumni 
Office, is speaking at titteen high 
schools situated between (Jreenlield 
aud Ureal Barrington. He speaks fox 
the purpose of interesting high school 
students in Aggie. 

The Mettawampe (lult h.d a chicken- 
pie supper for its annual Ladies' Night 
in Belchertown, Saturday, February l'.». 
The Community Club ol that town was 
the host and caterer. Trek staatOl 
Hicks led a trek over a new trail for 
t COM who did not go by the '.i-2H B. & M. 

The It »21 baseball schedule just an- 
nounced for the University of Vermont 
includes 24 games. A Southern ttip 
has been arranged, and games planned 
with Georgetown and Catholic Univers- 
ity of Washington, Colgate, Syiaeuse, 
Lehigh, and Columbia Colleges are also 
scheduled. 

The Entertainment Committee of the 
Semi-Centennial Celebration has been 
appointed. Miss Hamlin is to take 
charge of rooms, Prof. McLaughlin the 
Alumni dinner and procuring food, 
Prof. Phelan, transportation, Mr. Burke, 
concessions, and Mr. French, temporary 
accommodations on the campus. 

The members of the M. A. C. faculty 
and students who took pari in the 
"Pageant of the Pilgrims", which was 
so successfully staged at Stockbridge 
Hall, Friday ewening, February 11, 
were tendered a reception and enter- 
tainment by the Unity Church on the 
evening of Feb. 22. 

Y. M. C. A. Discussion Groups. 
fjl'mfesscir Mach liter's discussion group 
on Japan will meet as usual this week 
Wednesday evening at 6-45 in Stock- 
bridge Hall, Boom 817. The subject 
for discussion will be "The Relations 
of the United Stales and Japan". All 
welcome. 

At their class meeliug February 15 
the Freshman Class voted to furnish 
the recreation room in the Memorial 
Building. Mr. Campbell outlined the 
war record of M. A. C. and explained 
how the money was raised to build 
the Memorial Building. Pledges for 
$1000 have already been received. 
Those who were not at the meeting can 
obtain blanks from the class Treasurer 
or Mr. Campbell. These should be 
filled out and given to the class Treas- 
urer as sood as possible. 

The Memorial Hall Management Com- 
mittee has elected S. B. Parker, chair- 



When serving 

HOUSE PARTIES OR LUNCHES 

consult us. If you do not see 
what yon want in our display, 
tell us and we will make it. 



W. B. DRURY 

io Main Street. 



WfflGLI 

|5£ ■ PKkact 



Before the War j 

During the War 



5 



£sMCfc*Cl 



NOW! 



The Flavor Lasts 
So Does the Pries! 




KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



PLAZA 

Northampton Muss. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

When Um Best 

PHOTO-PLAY 



A re atiou ii 

Froiram changed daily except Monday 

and Tuesday. 

I Kl l» K l\ BELMONT. Manuuei. 



Full Line ol 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

■ 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



Cmndy Shop 



Sodm Pmrlor 



BECKM ANTS 
Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton. 



Mmmmachummttm 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, Inc. Northampton, Mass. 



An optical shop which measures up to the [] 

highest standard of modern nervlce. You I 

can rely on our skill and icood taste In all . 

opttoal matters. | 



Our Art Department | H filled with pletaTM 
miltahle for the decoration of "frat" houses, 
or for hirth'la.v and wedding gifts, (ireeting 
SCfCS for particular people. 



==HARDWARE^= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 






;; ■ 






The 



Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 23, 1921. 




/i I? /I /^TT— 

that the last month has proved us the undisputed leaders 
in Amherst for quality and right price neckwear. We 
are constantly offering a new line of the latest shapes and 
patterns at quick turnover prices^ 



man, Nathan Gillette '21 secretary, and 
George Campbell, manager. Subjects 
such as the constitution and by-laws, 
assignment of rooms, house rules, Col- 
lege store and barber shop were dis- 
cussed. The committee consists of S. 
K. Parker '04, It. H. Jackson '08, E. J. 
Montague 'IB, H. Mosely '22, Nathan 
Gillette '21, Prof. V. A. Rice, Dr. J. S. 
Chamberlain, George Campbell '20, 
President Butterfield and Mr. Kenney. 



the state. It is edited by Samuel At- 1 
kins Elliot, A. M., D. D. 



ALUMNI 

'76. — Frederick G. Campbell has sold 
his farm in Vermont. He is now living 
in Boston. 

'96.— H. I). Hemenway is a lecturer 
with the Art Institute of Chicago. His 
work is to travel in Illinois, Michigan, 
Minnesota, and South Dakota talking 
ou "Making Home Grounds Beautiful." 
'08.— L. A. Bevan is now secretary of 
the Agricultural Committee, Boston 
Chamber of Commerce. 

'16.— The marriage of Donald Wil- 
liams to Ruth L. Uart of New York 
City has been announced. 

'17.— Paul Squires. Detroit, Mich., 
was recently married. 

'17.— Harold B. Pierce is instructor of 
Chemistry at the State College in Penn- 
sylvania. 

'18.— A. S. Mallory, formerly an assist- 
ant in the Agronomy Department, is 
now connected with the Experiment 
Station at Rutgers college, New Jersey, 
and has begun an investigation of a soil 
problem connected with the control of 
the JapaneBt beetle. He is now 
located at Riverton, New Jersey. 

'19.—W. K. French of the Short 
Course Department is to be married in 
June. 

'20.— F. E. Cole, '20, was married 
February 22 to Miss Olive E. Carroll 
'19, who recently resigned her position 
in the Amherst High School. 

'20.— Lei and S. Graff, who 's teaching 
agriculture in the Norfolk County Ag- 
ricultural School, has been on the cam- 
puB over the holiday. 



Another book recently acquired by 
the library is the "Handbook for Prac- 
tical Farmers", compiled by Hugh 
Findiay. It is of especial interest in 
that two of the contributors are well 
known at Aggie. The article on Poultry- 
Is written by Wra. Sanctuary, B. Be., 
now at New York State School of Agri- 
culture, who is an Aggie alumnus; and 
that on Animal Husbaudry, by Prof. 
McNutt, B. Sc, until recently of the 
Animal Husbandry Staff here. 



LIBRARY ACCESSIONS 

Mr. Green has recently obtained sev- 
eral books on Physical Education and 
Sex Hygeine. These books are taken 
from a list prepared by Dr. Seeley, lof 
Springfield, who lectured here last Fall. 
More books wili be added to the collec- 
tion in the near future. The books 
have been placed on the platform up- 
stairs in the library, where anyone who 
wishes may go to read them. 



A recent addition of note to the libra- 
ry collection is 20 volumes of the 
"Farmer's Advocate", dating from 1909 
to the present time. The magazine is 
said to be the best farm paper in Can- 
ada and should prove of much value. 



President Butterfield has presented 
to the library a set of eight volumes, 
full morocco bound books, entitled "A 
Biographical History of Massachusetts". 
The work consists of the biographies 
and autobiographies of leading men of 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 

A wireless plant at Lawrence, Kans.. 
gives K. U. students first hand informa- 
tion on games played away from home 
The Springfield Student says: Massa 
cbusetts Aggie has a squad of eighty, 
six men as a football nucleus for next 
fall." 

The University of Utah was the sceue 
of a trial by student court of the soph- 
more leaders charged with kidnapping 
the innocent freshmen president, a vio- 
lation of constitution rules of tbestu- 
deut body. 

The Sprinufield Student says: "At a 
recent meeting of the Rotary Club of 
Springfield; President Butterfield of M 
A. C. made astatement that the college 
was at a crisis regarding new buildings 
and additional salaries for instructors. 
He stated that two million dollars was 
necssary for immediate needs." 

The Intercollegiate Conference for 
Undergraduate Student Government 
will meet at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology April 15 and 1«. 
M. A. C. will be represented by a mem- 
ber of the Alumni Committee for Stu- 
dent Activities, Mr. Campbell, and the 
chairman of the Faculty Committee on 
Student Life. 

The Connecticut Campn* says that C. 
A. C. has more students enrolled as 
candidates for a B.Sc. degree in agricul- 
ture than any other New England state 
college except Mass. Aggie. The figures 
are as follows: M. A. C. 436, C. A. C. 
262, Rhode Island 48, Vermont 03, 
Maine 111, and New Hampshire 1SB. 
In contrast the University of Minnesota 
has about 600 candidates for a degree in 
agriculture, out of the thousands en- 
rolled in the university. 

lb connection with the recent dis- 
cussion about the campus to determine 
rushing rule., for next year, it is inter- 
esting to note some of the rules laid 
down by the Interfraternity Conference 
of Dartmouth for the rushing week of 
the Fraternities on that campus. The 
rushing season at Dartmouth is held 
the second week after the Winter Carn- 
ival. During this week, freshmen are 
not allowed to talk fraternity matters 
or even to have social intercourse with 
fraternity members except during the 
hours of 6 and 10 i». m. Freshmen are 
invited to fraternities by means of uni- 
form, printed invitations issued by the 
fraternities through the council. No 
fraternity can issue an invitation to 
one man for more than one hour on the 
same night. 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 
Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

The Collegian, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-one Index, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

G. M. Campbell, Ass't Sec. 1 75 ' 
G. M. Campbell, Secretary 175 1 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 



F. P. Rand, Manager 
C. D. Kendall, President 
C. F. Clark, Manager 
William H. Peck, Manager 

F. A. Gilbert, Manager 
J. 1). Evers, Manager 
C. W. Bunker, Manager 
L. P. Martin, Editor 

G. W. Edman, Manager 
M. F. Webster, Editor 
Frederic Howard, Manager 
C. 1). Kendall, Mviager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 

v x , ,. , Howard Goff President 

Y. M. C. A., 



.36 k 
280 
280 

8325 

8325 

416-M 

280 

8377 
280 

214 

8325 

280 

280 
83'4 



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Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst, - M*»- 



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11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass 



-The- 

COLONIAL INN 

Pleasant Street 

JUST BEFORE YOU ENTER THE CAMPUS 

The student gathering place for 

the real home cooking and 

college life. 

Board Weekly and Transient 



HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



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FOR 



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COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



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M>V()ftll* 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXI. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, March 2, 1921. 



No. 17 



LONG HONORED FACULTY 
MEMBER PASSES AWAY 



Death Claims Prof. Charles H. Fern- 
aid, Founder of Department of 
Entomology at M. A. C. 

(In February 22, Washington's Ilirth- 
,1:1V, while t tie college. ffH enjoying a 

holiday, and while all t tie elans I us 

in which he had taught BO many sub- 
jects were deserted ami still, Professor 
(tunics Henry Fernald, once President 
of the College, Honorary Director of the 
(•raduate School since 1910, and one of 
ihe most noted entomologists in the 
world, passed away. 

Although Prof. Fernald was known 
personally to but few of the present 
students at M. A. C, because of his 
cessation of official college work in 1910, 
in order to devote his time to the com- 
Coatinmsd on p»»« 8 

AMERICAN PEOPLE UNEASY, 

SAYS REV. MR. B0YNTON 



VARSITY LOSES 24-23 TO 

NEW ENGLAND CHAMPIONS 



VOLUME OF STUART C. VINAL'S 
PAPERS GIVEN TO LIBRARY 



Brooklyn Pastor Addresses Students 
at Sunday Chapel. 

"The most curious and pathetic ob- 
ject today is the American people." 
Phis is the opinion of the Hev. NYhc- 
miah Boynton of Brooklyn, N. V . who 
spoke in chapel {Sunday nioining on the 
Ue-Crealion of the World. 

'There was never a people," he eon- 
1 1 ii ned , "in such a state of unrest. 
They are better otT than any other Ba- 
llon, and yet they are dissatisfied, un- 
i i-y. ami ill-determined." 

'Karl tirey, in the book he wrote 
tOOB after visiting America, says a man 
must have four things to succeed : first . 
two or three underlying principles; 
second, relations dependent upon him; 
third, honest work to do, no matter how 
tint pie; fourth, recreation. 1 would 
like to add a fifth one, a play on the 
n-.ieatiou. We are witnessing 
the absolute re-creation of the world 
I" be sure this is not a new process, 
lot the world was recreated when 
man first tamed the horse, when the 
Pilgrims landed, when the printing. 
[tess was first used, and many other 
Most people do nut realize that 
■■ h a thing is taking place. 
There can be no such thing as isola- 
• in this world. Some people, such 
nanyof our statesmen, see this, but 
only for the benelit of the nation. To 
quote the words of Abraham Lincoln, 
in Jobs. Drinkwater's play, words 
which will ring throughout the world, 
Ihe world is greater than you or I.' 
The man who invests a frown, will 
receive a farthing, but he who invests a 
le and his whole self, will receives 
tTiune. The world is being re-created 
detour very eyes, and it is up to us 
1 have our vision, to see our chance i" 
meat universe of adventure, and 
MB it." 



Marshmar. Smith, and Berry Star in 
^tast Game. 

Last Tuesday afternoon the varsitv 
basketball team proved to a large 
assembly in the Drill Hall that they 
have one of the strongest teams in New 
England. Worcester Tech, which lias 
the strongest team in this section of 
the country, came up to Amherst for a 
holiday game and just barely nosed out 
thefast M. A. C. quintet, in the last 
minute of play, by a tft-M score. 

The floor work of the varsity was ad- 
mirable, their passing being superior to 
tliat of their opponents. In the middle 
of tlie second half the home team un- 
corked such a burst of speed and skill 
that when five min